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BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong College 
of Savannah 



Savannah, Georgia 




For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1956- 1957 



SI MMER FALL \\I\TKI! SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong College 



of Savannah 



A City Supported Junior College 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 




IRS-*^ 



XI ember shij> In 

American Association of Junior College 

Southern Association of Collejn - and Secondary Schooh 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



'OLUME XXI M Mlil.R 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR 1956-1957 
Summer Session Evening College 1956 

FIRST TERM 

Registration Monday, June 18 

Classes begin Tuesday, June 19 

Last day to register for credit Friday, June 22 

Holiday Wednesday, July 4 

Mid-term reports due Friday, July 6 

Examinations Thursday, July 26 

Second Term 

Registration Monday, July 30 

Classes begin Tuesday, July 31 

Last day to register for credit Friday, August 3 

Mid-term reports due Friday, August 17 

Examinations Friday, September 7 

FALL QUARTER 

Freshman testing and sophomore counseling Monday, September 17 

Freshman orientation and registration Tuesday thru Friday, September 18-21 

Registration Monday, September 24 

Classes begin Tuesday, September 25 

Last day to register for credit Friday, September 28 

Mid-term reports due Friday, October 26 

Pre-registration for winter quarter Monday thru Wednesday, November 19-21 

Thanksgiving holidays Thursday thru Sunday, November 22-25 

Examinations Monday thru Wednesday. December 10-12 

Homecoming 

Basketball game Saturday, December 15 

Reception and dance Friday, December 21 

Christmas holidays Thursday, December 13 thru Tuesday, January 1 

WINTER QUARTER 

Registration Wednesday, January 2 

Classes begin Thursday, January 3 

Last day to register for credit Tuesday, January 8 

Mid-term reports due Friday, February 1 

Pre-registration for spring quarter Monday thru Wednesday, February 25-27 

Examinations Wednesday thru Friday, March 13-15 

Spring holidays Saturday thru Wednesday, March 16-20 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration Thursday, March 21 

Classes begin Friday, March 22 

Last day to register for credit Wednesday, March 27 

Mid-term reports due Friday, April 26 

Pre-registration for summer and fall quarters Monday thru Wednesday, May 13-15 

Examinations Monday thru Wednesday, June 3-5 

Sophomore beach party Friday, June 7 

Graduation Monday, June 10 



A<l mi 11 is I rat ion 

The College Commission 

Hi km mi i. V. Jenkins Chairman 

Victor l>. Ji nkins Vice Chairman 

Iack E. Cay, Jr., Ex-Officio Herbert L. Kayton 

William \. Early, Ex-Officio Lee Mingledorff, Jr., Ex-Officio 
11. Lee I i i ion. Jr., Ex-Officio John I". Pidcock, Ex-Officio 
Joseph II. Harrison Dr.. Helen Sharplei 

Fred \\ essels, Jr. 

Administrative vStaff and Faculty 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B.. M.S. President 

ARTHUR M. GlGNILLIAT, \.l>.. MA., Ph.D. Vice-President and Director 

o) the Evening College 

J i i.k C. RossiTER, Associate in \it- . Secretary \ Treasurer 

M. Lorrain] Anchors, A.B.. M.A. Registrar 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emor) I niversit) ; M. \.. I niversity of 

Georgia 

Instructor in History 

Jane Bland, Associate in \rt-. Armstrong College of Savannah 

Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

"Stephen P. Bond, B.S. in Architecture, Georgia Institute of 

Technology. 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Minnie McG. Campbell, Diploma from the Banks Secretarial School 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

Arthur W. Casper, B.S., Beloit College: M.S.. I niversit) of Wiscon- 
sin; M.S.. I niversit) of Georgia. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Physics 

Lamar W. Davis. B.S. and M.S.. I niversit) of South Carolina: Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business (administration 

Josephine Simmons Denmark, B.S., Georgia Tea* hers College; M.S. in 
H.E., Universit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Rossiter C. Dlrfee. A.B. and M.A.. Stanford University 

Instructor in English and Director of the Masquers 

** Part Time Instructor 



I ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA\ WWII 



Joseph \\ . Green, \.li.. Birmingham-Southern College; M.A.. Vander- 

l>ilt I Diversity; Graduate Stud) toward a doctorate. Vanderbilt 
Uni\ersit\ 

Instructor in English 

••Hubert Hawthorne, Retired Mechanical Engineer from the Central 
of Georgia Railway 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Elizabeth Ogletree Hitt, Attended Armstrong College 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

Essie Di \< w Jenkins, Owensboro Business College, Kentucky 

Instructor in Typing 

Albert J. Kelley, M.D.. Visiting Lecturer 

Joseph I. KlLLORIN, A. EL St. Johns College: M.A.. Columbia University 
Instructor in History 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.M.. Converse College: A.B.. I niversirj of 
Georgia: M.A.. Columbia University 

Instructor in French and English 

Virginia Mattson, Dickinson College. Junior College Certificate 
Assistant to the Librarian 

Elmo M. McCray, Jr., B.S. and M.S.. University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Helen Meighen. Taylor's Business College 

Secretary to the Vice-President 

**Elizabeth Koch Mitchell, B.S.. University <-f Uabama; Graduate 
Certificate in the Management Training Program. Radcliff-Harvard 
College 

Instructor in Mathematics 

John Morris, B.S. in Engineering. Princeton University; M.S. in 
Chemical Engineering. Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Marjorie A. Most. i ^. Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
College of Savannah 

Secretary to the President 

George Nichols, Attended Richards" Business School 

Clerical Assistant in the Business Office 

** Part time instructoi 



VDMINISTRATION 



Jack H. Padgett, V.B., Wofford College; MA., Universit) of North 
( Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 

James Harri Persse, B.F.A., Universit) of Georgia; Mastei of Music, 

Florida St at«- I niversit) 
Director of the Glee Club <m<l Faculfo idvisor for Student Publications 

Elizabeth Pound, Georgia State College for Women, State Teachers 
( College 

Director oj the Student Ceniei 

Jo \\\i Roi kos, Certificate in Secretarial Course, Armstrong (College 
of Savannah 

Clerical Assistant in the Business Office 

Jane Thomas Rowland, LB., Bessie Tift College; M.S.. Emorj Uni- 
\ ersity 

Instructor in Biology 

Ray Rowi.wn. \.B.. Mercer Universit) : Master of Librarianship, 
Emory Universit) 

Librarian 

Hoy Jesse Sims, B.S.. David Lipscomb (College: M.S.. Universit) of 
Tennessee 
Instructor in Physical Education for Men and Basketball Coach 

Robert I. Strozier. A.B. and Graduate Study. Universit) of Georgia 

Instructor in English 

Dorothy Thompson, A.B.. Monmouth College: M.A. Northwestern 
University; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work, Western Reserve 
University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

•Carmen Torrie, B.S.. Concord College: M.S.. I niversit) of Teni 

Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Dorothy Morris Wade. B.S.. I niversit) of Tenne»ec 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 



Leave of Absence 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANN Ml 



Armstrong Evening College Instructors 

Tommy W. Adams, B.>. in Business Administration, Berrj College 
Instructor in Commerce 

Mariw ANDERSON, B.A.. Texas State College for Women: M.A. Colum- 
bia Universit) 

Instructor in English 

Wesley W. Apple, B.S., Carnegie I n-titute of Technology 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Robert B. Blackmon, B.S.. Clemson College 

Instructor in Mathematics 

ERDMAN Bowe, A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College: M.A. Colum- 
bia University 

Instructor in Geography 

Samuel A. CaNx\ t , A.B.. L.L.B.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Political Science 

David B. Comer. B.A., Tulane University; M.A., Tulane University; 
Ph.D.. Duke University 

Instructor in English 

James Charbonmer, A.B.. B.S.. Geneva College. Geneva University. 
Switzerland: B.D.. Dreu University: A.M. Yale Universit) : Doctor 
of Letters. Geneva University 

Instructor in French. German and History 

W. Hobart Childs, B.S.. Wheaton College: Th.B.. Th.M.. Westminster 

Theological Seminary: S.T.M.. Faith Theological Seminary 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Phillip E. Dalton, B.A., I niversit) of Miami 

Instructor in Ps) cholog) 

Orlando \. Diaz, B.S.. Phillips University; MA., Phillips University 

Instructor in Spanish 

John J. Di w. 15. \.. Harvard University 

Instructor in English 



ADMINISTRATION 



Mk ha] i .1. (rVN\\M. I). \ . I Diversity <>f Georgia; M. \ . I niversit) <»f 
North Carolina; ILK. I niversit) "I Georgia 
Instructor in Political Scieru 

\\ ilter J. Gans, B.S. in B.A., I niversit) «.f Richmond; M.B.A., Har- 
vard Graduate School. 

Instructoi in Economics 

Clare B. Gray, B.A., Florida State 1 niversity 

Instructor in English 

Florence F. Goodrich, A.B... Hillsdale College; M.S.P.H.. University 
of Michigan 

Instructor in Health and Sociolou^ 

Robert G. Hattwick. B.A., Ohio State 1 diversity: M.B.A., Ohio State 
University; Ph.D.. Florida State University 

Instructor in Psychology 

Julia F. Hering. B.S.. Florida State University; M.A., Florida State 
I niversity 

Instructor in History 

Joe Garland Higgs, B.S.C.E.. University of Tennessee; M.S.C.E., Pur- 
due University 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Rosa B. Hopson A.B. : Middlebury College; M.A.. University of Geo- 
gia; Certificate from Sorbonne University 

Instructor in French and English 

Wendell M. Houston, B.C.E., Clemson College 

Instructor in Mathematics 

C. Allan Inglesby, A.B.. University of North Carolina; M.A., Emory 
University 

Instructor in History 

Warren Ray Jones, B.C.E.. Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Mary Howard Lebey, A.B., Winthrop College: M.S.S.W.. University 
of North Carolina 

Instructor in Sociology 



8 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

H \ck L. Lucky, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Edna Luke, B.S. in Education. University of Georgia; M.A. in Educa- 
tion, University of Georgia 

Instructor in Music 

Albert R. Marks, Jr., B.S., University of North Carolina; Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

John Fleetwood Moore, Savannah Traffic Bureau 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic Management 

Joseph C. Muller, B.B.A., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Christopher B. Murphy, Student Beaux Arts Institute and The Art 
Students' League, New York 

Instructor in Drawing and Painting 

Margaret A. Murphy, A.B., University of Georgia; Advanced Study. 
Columbia University 

Instructor in Ceramics 

Don Martin, A.B., Manchester College; M. Sc. in Chemistry, Ohio 
State University 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Laura Parker, B.S. in Education, Georgia Teachers College: M.A. in 
Education, University of Georgia 

Instructor in English 

Robert A. Porter, A.B., Duke University: M.S.S.W.. School of Social 
Work, Richmond Professional Institute of the College of William 
and Mary 

Instructor in Psychology 

Alan James Robertson, B.S.. University of Missouri: M.A.. Univers- 
ity of Missouri 

Instructor in Business Administration 

William Rokoff, B.S., New York University; Graduate Work. The 
College of the City of New York 

Instructor in Business Administration 



\|)MI\ISTK.\T1()\ 



Earnest Siegel, B.A., Northeastern University; M.S. in S.S., Boston 
I niversit) 

Instructor in Psychology 

\l\m E. Sutton, B.A., I niversit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Economics 

Louis A. Thompson, M.B.A., LL.B., Universit) of Georgia; Certified 
Public \ccountan1 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Akdellk \\ u.dhour, A.B. in Journalism; Graduate Work in English, 
Universit) of Georgia 

Instructor in English 

Joseph Zelnigher, A.B.. D.D.S.. New York Universit) 
Instructor in Physical Science 



Genera] Information 

Hislor) and Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on Ma) 27, L935, b) 
Hit Mayor and Udermen of the ( it\ <>f Savannah to meet a long-fell 
nerd for a junior college. I he firsl poUege building was the magnificent 
home <>f the late George I . Vrmstrofig, a gifl to the cit) ; front bis widoM 
and his daughter. Tin- former borne, n<»\\ called the Armstrong Build- 
ing, is an imposing structure of Italian Rennaissance architecture; 

inside, it- spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignit) : 
while outside it is one of the beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation, 
the campus has been enlarged until now it include- four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker; John \\ . Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Program, the Women's Lounge. 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall. 
which contain- the auditorium and theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and da— rooms; and Thomas (iambic Hall. >ite of science 
lecture room- and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Lark, the most beau- 
tiful park in the <it\ : the other two face Montere) Square, one of the 
carefull) planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Lark on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college tibrar) as well a> the Librar) of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong -indents have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 

appointed 1>\ the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as e\- 
officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham Count) 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the Count) Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a stead) increase. 
At present the total number of students in the da\ and evening pro- 
grams is approximate!) one thousand. 



Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community b) giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 



L2 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The student ma\ complete one or more of the following specific 
objectives. 

1. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree: 

2. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law. home economics, the 
ministry and other profession-: 

3. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry : 

4. Complete two years of an engineering program 
which is transferable for credit to colleges of en- 
gineering. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students 
completing an approved program. 

Admission to the College 

A student planning to enter Armstrong will obtain from the Regis- 
trar an "'Application for Admission Form." The student will complete 
and return this form to the Registrar's office. Request the High School 
Principal, or the College Registrar ( in the case of a transfer student I . 
to send a transcript of credits to the Registrars Office. Armstrong Col- 
lege of Savannah. Savannah. Georgia. 

Having checked the students records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar's office will send 
a notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together 
with certain physical examination forms which must be completed and 
returned before the student can complete registration. The applicanl 
will be notified of the dates of the freshman placement examination-. 
These tests do not affect a students entering Armstrong, but will enable 
the facultx advisers to assist him in selecting a program of study upon 
entrance. Students are required to take these tests before registration 
is completed. 

Requirements For Admission 

There are two methods of admission to Armstrong College: eithei 
b) certificate or by examination. 

By Certificate 

I. \ candidate for admission to Armstrong College <>f Savannah 
b\ certificate must be a graduate of an accredited high school with at 
least fifteen units of credit. 



«.l NERAL INFORMATION I ; 



■> i . 



1. No subject-matter unii> arc prescribed. The high school pro* 
ram should be of such nature as to lt i \ * - satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to con- 
tribute to this end are English composition, literature natural science, 
history and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. 
The right i- reserved to reject any applicant whose high school program 
does nol indicate adequate preparation For college work. 

3. V record of high school credit- earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the Office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Two units in high school algebra and one in plane geometry 
are pre-requisites for admission to the freshman class in engineering, 



By Examination 

Student- beyond high school age. who do not meet the above 
requirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Edu- 
cational Development tests i high school level I . The student will be 
admitted to college on the basis of his scores. These tests should be 
completed at least one week before registration. Additional informa- 
tion may be secured from the Registrars office. 



By Transfer 

Credit will he allowed for work done in other institutions of 
proper rank and standing and in certain cases for training received in 
the Armed Services. Credit from other institutions will be accepted to- 
ward graduation to the extent that the student has a general average 
of "C" for all college work transferred. To receive a degree from 
Armstrong College of Savannah, a student must be in attendance 
taking a normal study load for two quarters earning a "C" average 
and. in addition, must satisfy the requirements of a particular course 
of study. Adults (students over 21 \ears of age I may receive credit 
for certain college work on the basis of the General Educational De- 
velopment tests I college level) . 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Development 
tests show scores that indicate the applicants ability to do college work. 
A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement l VA Form No. 7-1993) is 
required of every veteran who attends this institution under Public 
Law 550 (Korean Bill), application for which may be completed at 



14 XKMSTROV; COLLEGE OF S\\ WWII 



the Veterans Administration office in the Industrial Building, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificate from the Vet- 
erans Administration, the student should contact the Armstrong Col- 
lege Veterans Office regarding processing of certificate and future 
month!) reports. All veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 
550 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 



Admission of Special Students 

Adults who are interested in enrolling in courses for their in- 
trinsic value but who do not wish college credit may be enrolled as 
special students. Requirements pertaining to entrance examinations, 
physical examinations, and physical education do not apply to these 
students. 

Transient Students 

A student regularly enrolled in another college may 
register at Armstrong as a transient student with the permission of 
his dean or adviser. This permision should be obtained in writing 
prior to registration. For such a student, entrance requirements are 
waived. 

Fees 

Tuition will be charged as follows for Armstrong College Courses: 

For 11-17 quarter hours — $55.00 

For each quarter hour less than 11 quarter hours — $5.00 

For each quarter hour in excess of 17 quarter hours — $5.00 

All Applied Music courses will be $45.00 per course. 

Students will be allowed registration day and the day after in 
which to complete registration. After these two days, a late registra- 
tion fee of $3.00 will be charged on the first day. $4.00 on the second 
day and $5.00 on the third da\. 

An activity fee of $5.00 each quarter will be charged all day stu- 
dents who are registered for 10 quarter hours or more. This fee is not 
charged Evening College students unless the\ wish to participate in the 
regular activity program of the college. 

Anyone wishing to audit a non-laboratoi \ course (but not receive 
college credit) may do so with permission of the instructor by paying 
a fee of $10.00 per course. 

The tuition for University of Georgia Extension courses is $5.60 
per quarter hour. A registration fee of $1.00 per student per quarter 
will be charged for University of Georgia Extension courses. 






GENERAL INFORMATION L5 



Fees for I niversit) of Georgia Extension courses are $5.00 per 
quarter hour. <>r $25.00 for each five hour course plus a registration 
fee of $1.00 jut studenl per quarter. I rider the I niversit) arrange- 
menl with \rmstrong College, the College charges a service fee ol 
-i\i\ cents per quarter hour which is paid l>\ the studenl al the time 
of registration. 

\ graduation fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

\n\ Btudent delinquent in thr paymenl of an) fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up. and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquenc) has been removed. 

Each student Leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of hi< college work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 
each. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee for 
materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions'' elsewhere in this bulletin. 

For cause a student may arrange with an instructor to make up 
an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to make 
up the announced test must be made within one week after the student 
returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced quiz 
and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination, and laboratory ex- 
aminations, except as shown below. The total charges to any one 
student for a final make-up examination and or final laboratory ex- 
amination in a given subject shall not exceed $5.00. All fees will be 
paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follow-: 

The student was absent (ll on official school business. 

(2) due to illness. 

i 3 > because of a death in the family. 

(4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented to the instructor in writing. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made only upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to 
students dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below: 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



WITHDRAWAL SCHEDULE 

Withdrawal Dates Vmounl due to college 

First Session June 18, 19, 20 20% of gross registration fees 

Summer Quarter, June 21, 22 lu f , of gross registration fees 

1956 June 25, 26, 27 60% of gross registration fees 

June 28, 29 80% of gross registration fees 

Second Session July 30, 31. Aug. 1 20% of gross registration fees 

Summer Quarter Vugust 2, 3 10% of gross registration fees 

1956 August 6. 7, 8 60% of gross registration fees 

lugusl { ). 10 80% "I gross registration fees 

Fall Quarter, 1956 Sept 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 20% of gross registration fees 

Oct. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 40% of gross registration fees 

Oct. 8, 9, 10 11, 12 60% of gross registration fees 

Oct. 15 16. 17, 18, 19 807c of gross registration fees 

Winter Quarter, 1957 Jan. 2. 3, 4, 7, 8 20% of gross registration fees 

Jan. 9 10, 11, 14, 15 40% of gross registration fees 

Jan. 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 60% of gross registration fees 

Jan. 23, 24, 25, 28, 29 S0 c /o of gross registration fees 

Spring Quarter, 1957 March 21, 22, 25, 26, 27 20% of gross registration fees 
March 28, 29, Apr. 1, 2, 3 40% of gross registration fees 

April 4, 5, 8, 9 10 60% of gross registration fees 

April 11, 12, 15, 16, 17 80% of gross registration fees 

Orientation and Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the students 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when 
the difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the adviser is usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because of greater inten- 
sity or critical developments are referable to community agencies out- 
side the college if this is agreeable to the student and his parents or 
guardians. 

The academic advisement of students is distributed among the 
entire faculty so that each instructor carries the responsibility for a 
proportionate number of the entire student body registered in the day 
program. Advisement interviews are scheduled with each student at 
least once a quarter and appointments for these interviews are mailed 
from the office of the Registrar. These interviews are designed to aid 
the student in planning his program of work in college. 

Library 

The college library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson 
Hall on the corner of \\ hitaker ami West Gaston Streets. All the 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 



material- arc readil) available to the students since all books are on 
open shelves. On the main floor i> the reference room which contains 
reference books, non-fiction books, reserve desk and circulation desk. 
Downstairs is another reading room, containing fiction, biography, 
books in foreign languages, current and bound volumes of periodicals. 
The workroom and office of the Librarian are also downstairs. 

\t the present time the library has more than I 1,000 volumes and 
a collection of pamphlets on subjects of current interest. More than 
one hundred periodicals are received, including four newspapers. Be- 
sides the books, periodical- and pamphlets, the libran lias a collection 
of recordings and a phonograph located in the downstairs reading 
room for the use of the students, facult) and staff. 

In addition to the resources of the eollege librar) the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, 
also housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains an outstanding 
collection of materials on Georgia and it> histor\ a- well as a large 
collection of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the His- 
torical S<»ciet\ consist of more than ten thousand hooks, eighty peri- 
odical subscriptions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of 
the more complete file* of Savannah new -paper-, dating back to 1763. 



ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE 

Full\ accredited college classes are offered after 6:00 p.m.. Mon- 
day through Friday. Classes meet one. two or three evenings a week 
according to the amount of credit the course carries. 

Students not seeking degrees max enroll in courses on a non- 
credit basis. 

It is possible to enroll for classes taught on Monday. Wednesday 
and Friday at 6:00. 7:30 or 9:00 p.m. Students employed during the 
da\ are urged to limit their enrollment to one or two courses. Eighteen 
five-hour courses, or the equivalent, are required for graduation. Stu- 
dents should complete programs of study required of candidates for 
graduation listed elsewhere in this Bulletin under "Curriculums."" 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed elsewhere 
in this Bulletin are applicable. When a student is enrolled in more than 
one course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. Refunds 
are made only in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc.. is covered under "Tees*. Student activit\ 
fees are not assessed evening college students, unless the) wish to par- 
ticipate in the regular activity program of the college. 

Armstrong Evening College, as successor of the Savannah Branch 
of the Lniversity of Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation in 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

June L951. Veterans are now attending under Public Laws 550 and 
89 \ I Korean Veteran*- 1 . 

Qualified brined Service personnel, current!) on active duty, are 
attending with tin ir tutition partially defrayed by the services. This is 
arranged through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarter!) announcements of Evening College courses, instructors. 
etc.. ma\ be obtained b\ addressing requests to the Director. Arm- 
strong Evening College. 447 Bull Street. Savannah. Georgia. 

Senior College Courses 

Through the Extension Division of the I niversit) of Georgia. Ann- 
strong Evening College offers upper-division courses which can be 
taken for credit, satisfying junior and senior requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. A minimum of one year of residence at the I niver- 
sit) is required to receive the bachelor's degree. The equivalent of one 
year of senior college work, however, may be completed through ex- 
tension classes in residence at Armstrong College for certain degree 
programs. 

Instructors in the extension classes are approved by the heads 
of the departments at the University of Georgia. These courses then 
carry Lniversity credit and are recorded in the Registrar's office at 
the Lniversity of Georgia. They are L niversity of Georgia courses 
taught in Armstrong Evening College. (See photostat). The section 
under "Fees" explains special charges for University of Georgia Ex- 
tension courses. 

In the past, the courses offered have been the core curriculum for 
the junior year leading toward the Bachelor of Business Administration 
degree; also, income tax accounting, a second course in business law, 
personnel administration and other advanced courses in economics and 
business administration as requested. 

Junior and senior courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree are 
offered in English, literature, histon. psychology and sociology. Other 
courses will be added if sufficient student requests warrant. 

Courses required to qualify for State Department Teacher's Cer- 
tificates are sometimes offered as extension clasx--. Students are 
limited to 90 quarter hours of residence credit at the junior college 
level. Another 45 quarter hours of credit may be obtained through 
senior college extension cla>-t-. 

Transcripts of credit granted for University of Georgia Extension 
courses must be obtained from the office of the Registrar. Lniversity 
of Georgia. Athens. Georgia — not from Armstrong College. In request- 
ing such transcripts, the student should indicate that the courses were 
taken at Armstrong College of Savannah through the Extension Divi- 
sion of the Lniversity of Georgia. 



GENER \l. INFORMATION L9 



The University of Georgia 

Office of the Resistbab 

Athens, Geob61a 

April 28, 195U 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

This is to advise that any student may use up to 
a maximum of l& quarter hours credit completed through 
correspondence and extension courses toward a degree 
at the University of Georgia. This may be taken over 
and above the first two years of work whether these 
be completed at a junior college or a senior college. 

Specifically, we will recognize without question 
up to U5 quarter hours credit completed in extension 
courses offered in a joint program sponsored by 
Armstrong College of Savannah and the Division of 
General Extension at the University of Georgia. 

Cordially, 



^W^vvvuV 



Walter N. Danner 
WND:cc Registrar 

Audio Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, for- 
eign languages and music, visual aids arc supplemented 1>\ recordings. 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should appl) 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is inter- 
ested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application blanks may be secured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong College. Those who wish to apply for scholarships for the 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

school \car beginning in September should file an application in the 

Presidents office not later than Jul\ L5. All applicants are required 
to appear before an oral interview hoard during the month of August. 
Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this interview. 

Commission — 7 for $100.00 each. I Roth men and women eligi- 
ble). 

These are work scholarships. Students who hold these spend a few 
hours each week as assistants in the Library, laboratories or in tin- 
administrative offices. In some instances it is possible for a student 
to earn more than $100.00 a year. 

Arthur Lucas Memorial --5 for $100.00 each. (Roth men and 
women eligible). 

Junior Chamber of Commerce -- 2 for $100.00 each I Roth men 
and women eligible). One is for a sophomore and one is for a freshman. 

Edward McQuire Gordon Memorial -- 1 for $200.00 I Men only 
are eligible) . 

Savannah Gas Company Engineering - 1 for $100.00. (Men 
only are eligible). 

Savannah Gas Company Home Economics — 2 for $100.00 each | \\ o- 
men only are eligible). 

Thomas Mayhew Cunningham Memorial — 1 for $200.00 ( Roth 
men and women are eligible ) . 

Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with the Rusiness Office. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this time 
the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those students who have 
met the requirements for graduation, and recognition is given to those 
who qualify for scholastic honors. The faculty and graduates partici- 
pate in full academic dress. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building i> open throughout the da) and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the book store. 

Student Activities 

I he entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole indhidua! and to as>ist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 
The college feels that students should take the responsibility for direct- 



GENER \l. INFORM \'l ION 2] 



irig their own affairs. The Senate is the governing studenl board of 
Armstrong College. This organization i> made up of elected representa 
lives of all studenl groups, h is the function of the Senate i<» co- 
ordinate, direcl and control studenl organizations and activities .it 
Armstrong. 

Athletics 

Basketball i> the onl) sporl in which the college fields an inter- 
collegiate team. Ml other sports at the college arc on an intramural 
basis. Intramural competition is offered in such sports as basketball, 
volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, softball and ping-pong. Ml arc 
encouraged to take part in this program. 

Physical Education Program 

\ll regular da\ students, except veterans, arc required to parti- 
cipate in a physical education program. Courses arc offered each 
quarter except during the summer. These arc listed elsewhere in the 
catalog under "Course Descriptions." 

Publications 

The students publish the Inkwell, a newspaper, and the Geechee, 
a yearbook. These afford students an opportunity to express their 
opinions on a wide \ariet\ of topics, to do creative writing and gain 
practice in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over sevent) students, was organized in the Fall of L950, after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was re- 
organized as the Little Theatre. Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in any 
phase of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up. costuming. 
and other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio and Tele- 
vision Workshop, formed to offer interested students an opportunity 
to develop techniques of radio and television broadcasting. 

Glee Club 

The Armstrong Clee Club was organized in September 1949. Its 
members are drawn from the student bod) and faculty. Besides giving 
two complete concerts at the college, one at Christmas and one in the 
spring, the group has sung for main civic groups in Savannah. The 
Glee Club has also produced musicals with the Armstrong Masquers. 



General Regulations 

Advisement and Placement Tests 

To help a student select .1 definite objective earl\ in his college 
program, the Armstrong >taff administers to each entering freshman 
a series of interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. In the fall, these 
are given during Freshman Week and are scored prior to the student's 
interview with an adviser. On the basis of these objective measure- 
ments, the students previous record, his interest and his famiK coun- 
sel, the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of 
stud) which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 



Physical Examinations 

Each day student must submit a completed physical examination 
report on the forms furnished b) the college before he can complete 
his registration. A chest X-ray is also required. On the basis of the 
examination, the physical education director will adapt a program 
of training and recreation to individual requirements. This regulation 
is not applicable to students enrolled in the Evening College. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximately forth-eighl hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

No student will be allowed to take more than 11 quarter hours of 
work in the Evening College during the fall, winter or spring quarters 
unless he has better than a "FT" average in the last quarter for which 
grades are available. A student will be limited to 6 quarter hours dur- 
ing any one term of the summer unless he has better than a "B" average 
in the last quarter of work for which grade are available. Ml enter- 
ing students are limited to 11 quarter hours of work in the fall, winter 
and spring quarters: and to 6 quarter hours of work during any one 
term of the Mimmer session. Exception max be made in the case of 
entering students who are not employed. 



(.1 NERAL INFORMATION 



Admission to Clase 

Students will be admitted t<» class when the Instructoi is furnished 
an official class card indicating thai he has completed hi> registration 
and paid \\\< fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of t lit* faculty and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the use on 
the campus of intoxicating beverages arc prohibited. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the administration and faculty that students in college 
should be held accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, report 
cards, warnings of deficient scholarship and all such notices are 
not sent out to parents or guardians by the Registrar except 
on request. Instead the students themselves receive these reports and 
are expected to contact their advisers whenever their work is unsatis- 
factory. Report cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports 
of failing grades are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each stu- 
dent has access to an adviser; in addition, the Registrar and all in- 
structors are available to help any student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

\ plus Exceptional 4 honor point? per quarter hour 

\ Excellent 3 honor points per quarter hour 

B Good 2 honor points per quarter hour 

C Fair 1 honor point per quarter hour 

Poor No honor points per quarter hour 

E Incomplete Incomplete must be removed before 

mid term of the following quarter 

F Failure Course must he repeated 

\\ Withdrew Course musl be repeated 

W I- Withdrew Failing Course musl he repeated 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade I should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements 
of the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the mid- 
dle of the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". An "E" 
grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

A student who receives an "E" grade in the Evening College will 
have one year in which to complete the requirements of the course. 
If the "E" grade is not removed within this time, it automatically be- 
comes an "F". An "E" grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and achieving an average grade of "B" or 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANIN \H 

better with no grade below that of "C" will be placed on the Perma- 
nent Dean's List Thi> li-t i- published each June in the commencement 
program. 

Graduates who inert the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 

Li>t and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 
(with highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with distinc- 
tion) will he bestowed upon those met ting tin above requirements with 
an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will he selected b\ the graduating da— from the 
five students with the highest scholastic a\erages in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a grade of "B" or 
better in each course during any quarter will be placed on the Dean's 
Scholastic Attainment List. 

Students in the Evening College enrolled for ten or more hour-. 
who earn 15 consecutive quarter hours of credit with grades of "B" or 
better in each course will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment 
List. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A day student who has been absent from class for a valid reason 
should have the absence excused with a written statement to his instruc- 
tor who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the Regis- 
trar's office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from the 
date the student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not be 
excused. Evening College students must leave excuses for absence in 
the Evening College office on a special form provided for that purpose. 

An E\ening College student whose absences for an\ cause exceed 
one third of the number of times the class meets in the quarter will be 
dropped from the class. The student will be given a *W if at the time 
he was dropped he had a passing grade: if at the time he was dropped 
he was failing, he will be given a '\\ I . 

The above regulation i- waived onl\ in those cases in which the 

instructor and the registrar concur. 

\ student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
time- the class meets in one week, and ha- one additional unexcused ab- 
sence, will be dropped from clas>. The instructors will notify the Regis- 
trar- office when a -Indent should be dropped. The Registrars office 
will notify the student. Grades assigned (<• those who have been dropped 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

will be either \\ 01 \\ I. \ -indent who is dropped within three weeks 
after the beginning of the quarter will automaticall) receive a grade of 
\\ . \ Btudenl who is dropped alter the 3rd week of the quarter will 
receive either a \\ or a \\ F depending upon his status at time the 
student withdraw- or is dropped from class. 

Students will be charged with absences incurred b) late registration 
in the college as indicated in the current bulletin and these absences 
<arr\ the same penalt) as the other absences from a course. 

Attendance at bi-weekl) assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 

\ formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, i> a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this in- 
stitution. An) student planning to withdraw should immediately make 
such intention- known to the administration of the college in writing. 
This notice is required to receive an) authorized refund-. 

\ student should formalb withdraw from an) class which he dis- 
continues 1>\ securing the written approval of the instructor and his 
facult\ advisor. This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's 
office. Grades assigned to those who withdraw will be either \\ or \\ F. 
A student who withdraws within three weeks after the beginning of the 
quarter will automatically receive a grade of W. \ student who with- 
draws after the 3rd week of the quarter will receive either a W or W/F 
depending upon his status at the time the student withdraws or is 
dropped from class. 

Dismissal 

\n\ da) student failing (except in cases excused hefore examina- 
tions on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than physi- 
cal education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. An) student who fails to make an average of at leasl 0.6 honor 
points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the first three 
quarters work at the college will not he allowed to re-register. With- 
drawal is recommended to all students who have less than a "C" aver- 
age at the end of the fourth quarter. \t the end of the sixth quarter's 
work a student must have a 0.8 honor point per quarter hour average in 
order to re-register. 

Any student in the evening program seeking credit who fail- I ex- 
cept when excused before final examination on account of illness) to 
pass at least one course in two consecutive quarters will be dropped 
from the rolls of the college. Any student in the evening program who 
fails to make an average of at least 0.6 honor points per quarter hour 
in the first 50 quarter hours of w ork at the college will not be allowed to 



26 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA\ \\\\H 

re-register. Withdrawal i> recommended to all student* who haw le» 
than a "C" average at the end of 70 quarter hours ol work. At the end 
of ( )() quarter hour- of work, a student must have an average of 0.8 
honor points per quarter hour in order to re-register. 

Student- win. have been asked to withdraw on account of academic 
deficiency will be re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes to 
another college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If a 
student does not go to another college he may re-register at Armstrong 
after two quarters. He re-enters on probation for one quarter, during 
which quarter he must make a "C" average. 



Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College oi v a 
vannah are listed below : 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed else- 
where in the catalog under "Curriculums" w ith an average 
grade of "C." Any exceptions to a program may be re- 
ferred by a student's advisor to the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standing. 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation will be 
completed at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. Not more than one-fourth of the total work required for 
graduation will consist of correspondence courses and 
credit for training in the Armed Services. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar^ 
office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 



Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student acti\it\ record, and the opinion- 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regular 1\ by representatives of the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, the Civil Service .the local Credit Bureau and 
other agencies having access to confidential records. A good college 
record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curriculums 



General 

Before registration, the Btudenl should PLAN \ PROGRAM 01 
STI Di WITH W VDVISER. Even if a Btudenl knows what courses 
are required for graduation, be should have on record in the office of 
his adviser a cop) of his program. In order for a student i<» make an) 
changes in hi> planned program he must consul! his adviser. The 
adviser and the Registrar will cheek a student- program and it will 
be approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

The Associate in Arts Degree is conferred upon all student- who 
successfull) complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the two- 
Near programs outlined in the catalog. 

If a student plan- tn transfer to another institution cither before 
or after graduation, it is essential that he determine what courses must 
he completed at Armstrong in order t<> conform with the degree re- 
quirement of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain -kills indispen- 
able to ever) college trained man and woman. The undertsanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings: right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives an set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman \ ear: English 14. 15 (114. L15) ; History 14. 1.") (114. 
115); ten quarter hours of natural sciences, and Physical Education 
11. 12. 13. With permission of instructor, students may substitute 
Physical Education 14 for Physical Education 12 and Physical Edu- 
cation 23 for Physical Education 13. Library Science 11 is required of 
all students who fail to pass an entrance examination. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of 
physical education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses des- 
cribed helow nun suhstitute English 28 for one of the required English 
courses. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 



2J! 



ujmstkov; collk(;k of s\\ wwii 



sknior collkck prkparatory programs 



Concentration 
Business Administration* 

First Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14, 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 . 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra . 5 

Library Science 11 1 

Mathematics 19— Finance 5 

Electives 4 



Senior College 
Preparatory 

Second Year 

English 21, 22— Sophomore 

English 10 

I'Iin -i<al Education 3 

Business Administration — 24, 25 — 

Accounting 10 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles ami 

Problems 10 

Political Science 13 — Govt, of U.S. 5 

Electives 10 



TOTAL 



IK 



TOTAL 



IK 



Concentration - Engineering Senior College Preparatory 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The student should obtain a catalog from the senior college 
he plans to attend and check this program against the requirements. 
The courses required for the freshman year have been worked out in 
consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 



FIRST YEAR 

Chemistry 11, 12— General 10 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative Analysis 5 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English . 10 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing ... 6 
Kngineering 19 — Descriptive 

Geometry 3 

Mathematics 16, 17, 20— College 

Algebra, Trigonometry and 

\nalvtic Geometry and Calculus 15 

l'li\-ical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL ~5S 



SECOND YEAR 
English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 

Phvsical Education 

Physics 21. 22. 23 

Mathematics 21. 22. 23— Calculus 

Histon 14 15 



l<> I \l. 56 



Concentration - Forestry Senior College Preparatory 

A one-year program for students in Forestry. The -indent should 
obtain a catalog from the senior college he plans to attend and check 
this program against the requirements. 

English I 1. 15 Freshman 10 

Mathematics 16, 17 College Ugebra, Trigonometry 10 

Physics 1 1 <»r Physical Science II 5 

v \ -tmlcnt should consult the catalog of hi- prospective senior college for 
required subjects. ( loll* >ges differ as to what subjects arc required for this 
course. 



CI HIJICl II M- 



29 

JO 

5 
3 
3 
5 

51 



Biolon 1 1. L2 Botam 



tics 21 I" 



lipals 



Physical Education II. 12, 13 

Engineering 1 1 I 'ran ing 

Political Scient e 13 « rovei umenl of I 

rOTAl 



Concentration - Homo Economics 

Senior College Preparatory 



FIRST YEAR 

English 1 I. 15 Freshman English 10 
History 1 1, 15— History of Western 

( j\ ilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation: 

Careers and Personal Development 5 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing ... 5 

\ 1 1 1 1 — Creative 5 

Laboratory Science 10 

Library Science 11 1 



SECOND YEAB 

English 21, 22— Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 12— Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 5 

Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 
Home Economics 24 — Family 

Fundamentals 5 

Social Studies 10 

Science Electives 5 

:< Matnematics 9 or 16 5 



TOTAL 



V> 



TOTAL 



18 



Coneeiitration - 
Industrial Management 



Senior College Preparatory 



This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. 



FIRST YEAR 



10 



Chemistry 11, 12 — General 
Chemistry 13 — Qualitative 

Analysis 5 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 10 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 6 

Engineering 19 — Descriptive 

Geometry 3 

Mathematics 16, 17. 20— College 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus . 15 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Library Science 11 1 



SECOND YEAB 

Economics 21, 24— Principles 

and Problems 10 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Business Administration 2K 2.5 — 

Principles of Accounting 10 

Physics 11. 12- General Physics . 12 
Mathematics 19 — Mathematics of 

Finance 5 

Physical Education 3 

History 14, 15— Western 

Civilization 10 



TOTAL 



53 



TOTAL 



60 



* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
stated on pages 58 and 59. 



30 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Concentration - 

Liberal Arts Senior College Preparatory 

Thia program is recommended for candidates for an \.B. degree, 
pre-education. pre - law. pre - ministerial, journalism, and other 
pre-professional concentration-. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 14, 15 — Western Physical Education 3 

I ivilizatioD 10 Two of the following course* 10 

Physical Education 11. 2. 3 3 History 25 — Recent European 

Labortory Science 10 Political Science 13 — Gov't of ILS. 

Mathematics 16 — College Psychology 21a — Introductory 

Algebra 5 Sociology 20a — Introductory 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry . 5 Economics 21 — Principl< - 

* Foreign Language 10 * Science 10 

Library Science 1 Elective* 9 

TOTAL 54 TOTAL 42 

Concentration - 

Mathematics Senior College Preparatory 

A course designed for those students who wish to major in mathe- 
matics. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 

English 10 Phvsical Education .3 

History 14. 15— Western Phvsics 11, 12 or 

Civilization 10 Phvsics 21. 22. 23 12 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 Electives 22 

Mathematics 16 — College 

Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry . 5 
Mathematics 20 — Analytic 

Geometry and Calculus 5 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL 49 TOT \ I 47 

Concentration - 

Medical TccIiiioIolm Senior College Preparatory 

This program is designed for those students who wish to obtain 
their first two years toward a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 
Technology \n \ssociate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below : 

* A student applying for admission to a >enior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of his adviser, sub- 
stitute nth. r courses required bj the Benioi institution during In- Brsl rwo years. 



CIKHICIU MS 



31 



FIRS! YEAR 




M:< OND 1 EAR 




1- nglisfa I 1. 1 5 Freshman English 


10 


English 21, 22 


10 


History 1 1. 15 Historj oi W estern 




Physical Education 


3 


( 'i\ ilization 


10 


Biolog] 23 


6 


Physical Education 11. 12. and 13 


3 


( hemistr) 13 


5 


Mathematics 16 


5 


Physics 11. 12 


12 


Biology 1 L, 15 


to 


French or German 


10 


Chemistry 11, 12 


in 


Mathematics IT 


5 


Library Science 11 


1 







TOTAL 

Concentration - 
Physical Education 

FIRST YEAR 
English 11. 15 —Freshman English 
History 1 1. 15— Western Civili- 
zation 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13 

* Mathematics 9 or 16 

Biolog) 14, 15 

Home Economics In — Nutrition 

Library Science 11 

**Electives 



49 



TOTA1 



51 



Senior College Preparatory 

SECOND YEAR 
English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biologv 18, 19 — Anatomy and 

Physiology- 10 

***Physical Education 23 — Senior 

Life Saving and Swimming 2 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating 

of Basketball 2 

Psychology 21a — Introductory 5 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 5 

Sociology 21 — Marriage & the 

Family 5 

**Electives 6 



TOTAL 



W J . 



TOTAL 



18 



Concentration - Physics Senior College Preparatory 



A course designed for those students who wish to major in Physics. 
FIRST YEAR 

English 21, 22— Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Physics 11, 12 or Physics 21, 22, 23 12 
Electives 22 



K> 



English 14, 15 — Freshman 

English 

History 14, 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 16— College 

Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

Mathematics 20 — Analytic 

Geometry and Calculus 5 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL 49 



TOTAL 



17 



* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
stated on pages 58 and 59. 

** It is recommended that English 28 and Physical Education 20 be taken as 
elective courses. 

*** The student is exempt from this course provided he has a Red Cross 
Senior Life Saving Certificate. 



32 



\K\ISTROV; COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Concentration - Pre-Dental Senior College Preparatory 
This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Dentistr) after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. \n Associate in Arts degree is awarded 
upon successful completion of the academic program described below: 

FIRST ^i I . \K SECOND ^ EAR 

English II. 1") Freshman English 10 Iln-ii-l. 21. 22 10 

History 14, 15 — rlistorj i>i Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Biolog] 23 6 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 . . . . 3 Chemistry 13 5 

Mathematics If, 5 Physics 11, 12 12 

Biology 14, 15 10 French or German 10 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 Mathematics 17 5 

Lihrary Science 11 1 

TOTAL 49 TOTAL 51 



Coiieentration - Pre-Medieal 

Senior College Preparatory 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Medicine after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts is awarded upon suc- 
cessful completion of the academic program descrihed hel<»w. 



FIRST YEAR 

English 14, 15 10 

History 14, 15 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 16, 5 

Biology 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 

Lihrary Science 11 1 

TOTAL 49 



SECOND YEAR 

English 21. 22 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology 23 6 

Chemistry 13 5 

Physics 11. 12 12 

French or German 10 

Mathematics 17 5 

TOTAL 51 



Coiieentration - Pre-Nnrsing 

Senior College Preparatory 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to he transferred to a school of nursing 
offering a B.S. in Nursing. 

English 14, 15 10 

History 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11 5 

Mathematics 16 5 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

\n\ three of the following: 
English 28 

Political Science 13 

Psychology 21a 

Sociology 20a 15 

TOTAL 48 



CI RRIC1 LI M- 



33 



Concentration - 

Pre-Optometr) Senior College Preparatory 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optometry in the I nited States are relativel) uniform bul are nol 
identical. The practice <>f optometry in all states is regulated 1»\ Boards 
of Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare 
a student for transfer t«» an\ school <»r college of optometry in tlie 
I nited States and Canada. 



FIRS! YEAR 
English II. 15 
Historj 1 »• 15 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 
Mathematics 16, 17 
Biolog] 1 I. 15 
Chemistry 11. 12 
Library Science 11 

TOTAL 



-I I OND \ EAR 

10 English 21, 22 

10 Physical Education 

3 Biologj 23 

Mi Physics 11. 12 

in Mathematics 2d 

in Sociology ami Psychology 

1 

.")! TOTA1 



16 



Concentration - 

Pre-Pharniac\ Senior College Preparatory 

This is a one-year concentration for those students who wish t<. 
obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmac) require three \ears minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

English 14. 15 10 

History 14, 15 . . . 10 

Chemistrj 11, 12 10 

Biology 18. 19 

or 
Biology 16, IT 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 
Mathcmatic- 16 

TOTAL 



10 

3 

_5 

48 



Concentration - 

Pre-Yeterinary Senior College Preparatory 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to he transferred to a senior institution. 



tudent to begin 



Some colleges and universities require a veterinan 

specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well rounded 
foundation for the study of veterinary medicine, it i> recommended that 
he pursue the two year pre-Medical program. 

English 14. 15 10 

History 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11. 12 10 

Biology 14, 15 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 . . 3 

Mathematics 16. 17 _10 

TOTAL "53 



34 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Concentration - Teaching Senior College Preparatory 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years f>\ 
colleges preparing teachers are general in nature: English, history. 
mathematics, a science, social studio and physical education to mention 

some of these. The program below enables prospective teachers to be 
certified b\ the State Department of Education as having completed 
t\\<> \ears of college and entitles the student to the Associate in Arts de- 
gree. Some of the third year requirements can be completed at Arm- 
strong Evening College as extension classes of the I niversit) of Geor- 

gm - FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

Education 11 5 Art 11 or Music 20 5 

English 14, 15 10 English 21. 22 10 

History 14, 15 10 Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

Natural Science 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Ed. 11, 12, 13 3 'Electives 24 

Political Science 13 5 

Psychology 21a 5 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL 49 TOTAL 47 

TERMINAL PROGRAMS 

Concentration - 
Business Administration 

Accounting Three-Year Terminal Program 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14. 15— Freshman English 10 ** English 21, 22 10 

History 14, 15 — Western Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 Economics 21. 24 — Principles 

Science 10 and Problems 10 

Business Administration 24. 25, Acct. 10 Business Administration 27, 28 — 

Library Science 11 1 Business Law 10 

Electives .... 4 ***Electives 15 
TOTAL 48 TOTAL JlS 
THIRD YEAR 

Business Administration 34 — Intermediate Accounting 5 

Business Administration 36, 37 — Income Tax Accounting 10 
Business Administration 29 — Cost Accounting or 

Business Administration 35- Intermediate Accounting 5 

Economics 30 — Personnel Administration 5 

Mathematics 5 

Electives 15 

TOTAL 45 



* Students in this curriculum should secure the catalog of the senior college 
which they plan to attend and plan a program with an adviser. 

Recommended electives for elementary teachers include health, geography 
economics, Georgia Problem- (Social Science 4), English 28 and addiitonal 
science courses. 

** English 28 ma\ be substituted for English 22. 
*** Students planning to complete the three year program should substitute 
10 hours in accounting for electives. 



CI nm<:i \a \i> 



35 



Concentration - \Ui 
Manx students w\ 
Iea\ in^i Armstrong. I o tl 
to select those subjects 
genera] education is incl 
well-rounded program. 
PTRSi \ l \i; 
English 11. 1") Freshman 

English 

Historj 1 L 15 W estera Civil 

zation 
Physical Education II, 12. 13 

Natural & n-m . 

Economy - 21, 24 — Prim iples 

ami Problems 
Electives 

Library Science 11 



ines§ Administration Terminal 

doI continue theii formal education aftei 
bese students the college ^i\c» the opportunity 

which have a vocational \alue. Sufficient 

u<l('(l in the core curriculum to make this a 



10 

10 
3 
10 

10 

t 
1 



SE< OND WAR 
$lisb 21 22 Sophomore English 10 
Physical Education 3 

Business Administration 21. 25 

\. counting 10 

Business Administration 27 — 

Business Law 5 

Business Administration and 

I ommen i Electives 10 

ryping 

Calculatoi and Comptometer 

Shorthand 

Business Administration — 34 

Intermediate Acct. 
Business Administration 28 — 
Business Law 
Electives I othei I 



TOTA1 



48 



TOTAL 



in 



Concentration - Business Administration General 

Three-\ear Terminal Program 

\ student who cannot transfer to a senior college at the end of his 
second year may get a broader foundation for work as a supervisor or 
junior executive l>\ completing the program below. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND iEAR 

English 114. 115— Freshman English 121, 122— World Literature 

English 10 or English 128 — Public Speaking 

History 114, 115 — Western ami Business Administration 115 — 

Civilization 10 Business Correspondence 10 

Natural Science 10 Business Administration 124, 125 — 

Economics 121, 124 10 Elementary Accounting 10 

Elective 5 Business Administration 127 

i E-370) Business Law . . 5 

Business Administration and 

Commerce Electives 10 

Free Electives 10 



45 
THIRD YEAR 
Student will select with an adviser seven of the following subjects: 
Business Administration 128 ( E-371 > — Business Law (2nd course) .... 
Business Administration 151 — Principles of Transportation 
Business Administration 160 (£-351) — Principles of Management 



15 



* English 28 may be substituted for English 22. 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH ^ 

Business Administration 161 — Principles of Insurance 
Business Administration L62 I K-390) — Real Estate Principles 
Economics 125 (E-312) — Elementary Economic Statistics 
Economics 127 (E-326)— Money and Banking 
Economics 128 (E-360) — Principles of Marketing 
Economics 129 (E-386) — Labor Economics 
Economics 131 (E-444) — Government and Business 
Economics 132 (E-431 — Investments 

Concentration - 

Business Administration Transportation 

Three-Year Terminal Program 
As a communications center, Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management. A com- 
mittee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck lines, 
in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the professional 
classes listed below. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114, 115— Freshman English 121, 122— World Literature 

English 10 or English 128 — Public Speaking 

History 114, 115 — Western and Business Administration 115 — 

Civilization 10 Business Correspondence 10 

Business Administration 151 — Natural Science 10 

Introduction to Transportation 5 Business Administration 154 — Ad- 

Business Administration 152 — vanced Rates & Tariffs 5 

Elementary Rates & Tariffs 5 Busniess Administration 155 — 

Business Administration 153 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

Intermediate Rates & Tariffs 5 Business Administration 156 — Inter 
Economics 121, 124 — Principles state Commerce Commission and 
and Problems 10 Public Service Commission Pro- 
cedure 5 

Business Administration 124, 125 — 
Elementary Accounting 10 

THIRD YEAR 

Students will select 5 of the subjects listed under the third year of Business 
Administration-General plus Business Administration 127, Business Law. Elec- 
tives to complete 135 hours total credits. 

Concentration - Transportation 

Fifty-Hour Concentration in Transportation 

Students wishing a thorough background in transportation ma\ 
receive a certificate upon satisfactory completion of the program that 
follows: 

BA 151 — Introduction to Transportation 5 

BA 152 — Elementary Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA 153 — Intermediate Ratt > and Tariffs 5 

BA 154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 5 

li \ 155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

BA 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission and Public. 

Service Commission Procedure 5 



CI RRIC1 LI MS 



37 



Economics 121 and L24 Principles and Problems 10 

English Ml and 115 Freshman English oi English 128 Public 

Speaking and T> \ ll"> Business Correspondence 10 

loi \l 50 

Concentration - Business Administration 

\ one \t\ii program in Business Vdmmistration lor those persons 

who ma) not w i>h to complete the two year concentration, with em- 
phasis on business courses. \ certificate will he awarded to those w ho 

successfull) complete the program. 

Business Vdministration 24, 25, 34 15 

Economics 21, 24 10 

Business Administration 27 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

Concentration ■ Commerce Secretarial Terminal 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 

wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 — Freshman Business Administration 24 — 

English 10 Accounting 5 

History 14, 15 Western 'English 21,22 10 

Civilization 10 Commerce 17 — Office Practice . . 5 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 .3 Commerce 21 a-b-c — Typing 6 

Natural Science 10 Commerce 22 a-b-c — Shorthand . 15 

Commerce 11 a-h-c — Typing 6 Physical Education 3 

Commerce 12 a-b-c — Shorthand 15 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL 55 TOTAL U 

Concentration - Home Economics Terminal 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who 
plan to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives 
are allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which 
have a vocational value or cultural subjects for worth) use of leisure 
time. FIRST yEAR SECOND YEAB 
English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 English 21, 22 — Sophomore English 10 
History 14, 15 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

Physical Education 3 and Decorating 5 

Natural Science 10 Home Economics 24 — Family 

(Human Biology included) Fundamentals 5 

Home Economics 10— Orientation : Home Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Personal Development 5 Planning and Serving 5 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing ... 5 Eleetives 19 

Psychology 21— Introductory 5 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL 49 TOTAL 47 

* English 28 may be substituted for English 22. 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLK(;K Oh SA\ \W Ml 



Concentration - Human Relations* Terminal 

The Terminal Program sequence in Human Relations is designed 
to -tart with the student's immediate interests in learning, methods of 
Stud) and aptitude measurement. The next course on principles and 
facts about the individual's growth, needs, feelings and learning about 
the world around him i> followed bj a practical application through 
experiments or l»\ interning in -elected communit) programs where 
individual development and adjustment ma\ he directl) observed. 
This leads to a stud\ of a person's relationship to his social groups. 
.t stud) of marriage and famil) adjustment, principles and facts about 
the \\a\ that our societ) i- organized and finally a practical stud) 
through local organizations of needs and resources for human adjust- 
ment in our community. V student who completes this sequence should 
have a basic understanding of himself and others that will improve his 
effectiveness in his family, his work (whether in the home or employed 
elsewhere I . his social relationships and his responsible participation 
in community living. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14. IS — Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 — Sophomore Engli-h 10 

History 14, 15 — Western Civilization 10 Biolog\ 14. 15 — General Zoology 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 or 

** Mathematics 9 or 16 5 Biology 16. 17 — Human Biology 10 

Physical Education 3 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and 

Family 5 

Psychology 22— Social Psycholog\ 5 
Sociology 20a — Introductory 

Sociology 5 

Sociology 20b — Social Problem- 5 

Elective 4 



Political Science 13 

Psychology 20 — Applied Psychology 
Psychology 21a — Introductory 
Psychology 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 

Psychology 

Library Science 11 


5 
5 

5 

5 

1 


TOTAL 


49 



TOTAL 



Concentration - Liberal Arts Terminal 

\ student in tbe Liberal Arts. Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by tbe college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest 



Students in other concentrations ma> elect any Psychology or Sociology 
course in tin- program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites are 
necessary in Psychologj 21b and Sociology 20b only. 

** .Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 

-tated on pages 58 and 59. 



CI RRIC1 II MS 39 







SECOND \ EAR 






Englisl 


21, 22 Sophomore 




III 


Engl 


-I. 


10 




IMi\ sici 


il Education 


3 


10 


Mm 


ives 


35 


3 








in 








.) 








<> 

1 









FIRST YEAR 
English I \. 15 Freshman 

English 
Histon I 1- 15 \\ estern 

( i\ ilization 
Physical Education II. 12. L3 
Natural Science 
* Mathematu - 9 <>i 16 
••Electives 
1 ibrar) Sen nee 1 1 

TOT \ I 48 rOTAl -W 



Concentration - Medical Technology Terminal 

This is a two-year program for those students who wish to meet 
the requirements of the American Societ) of Clinical Pathologists and 

who will complete their training at some approwd school of Medical 
Technology. \n Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below. 

Armstrong College is affiliated with the Savannah School for 
Medical Technologists, which is national!) approved. It i> possible Eoi 
a student to meet all requirements for national registration through 
these two institution-. 

FIRST \E\R SECOND YEAR 

English 14 15— Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 10 

History 14. 15 — History of Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Biology 23 6 

Physical Education 11. 12 and 13 3 Biology 21 5 

Mathematics 16 5 Chemistry 13. 25 12 

Biology 14. 15 10 Electives 9 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 

Library Science 11 1 

TOTAL 51 TOTAL 45 



Concentration - Nursing 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation 
with the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission 
of the instructor and the approval of the student's adviser, a student 
not enrolled in the School of Nursing may take am of the following 
courses: 

Biology 18, 19 10 

Chemistry 11 5 



* Note admission requirements for Mathematics ( > and Mathematics 16 as 
stated on pages 58 and 59. 

** A student must elect 20 hours from at lea>t three of the following de- 
partments: Foreign Language. Political Science, Economics, Fine Arts. Home 
Economics, Psychology, Sociology, Mathematics (other than Math. 19). 



40 ARMSTRON G COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Sociology -Ha ."> 

Physical Education In 1 

Biologj 21 .") 

Home Economics In 4 

Psychology 21a 5 

TOTAL 35 



Concentration - Stenographic 

A student who has onl) one \eat to spend in college may herein 
acquire some of the skills which will enable him to earn a livelihood. 

Commerce 11a, b, c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a, b, c — Shorthand 15 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Business Administration 24 — Accounting 5 

**Engli-h 14. 15 — Freshman 10 

•Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Commerce 13a. b, c, Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer 6 

TOTAL 50 



Physical Education is required in all one year terminal programs if a 
certificate is desired. 

** English 28 nun be substituted for English 15. 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to (1) withdraw an) course 
for which less tlian ten students register, (2) limit the enrollment in 
an\ course or class section, (3) fi\ the time <>f meeting of all classes 
and sections, and i h offer such additional courses as demand and 
staff personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will he given until the sequence is completed. 

Courses which are offend in the day program are assigned a num- 
ber which is less than 100. All Evening College courses are numbered 
above 100. In some course descriptions Evening College course num- 
bers appear in parentheses. For example: Biolog) 16-17 ill6-117i. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second. 
the number of hours of laboratory: and the third, the number of quarter 
hours of credit the course carries. For example: Human Biolog) 
(5-0-5). 

The quarters indicating when courses will he taught appl) to the 
«la\ sessions only, not the Evening College. 



ART 

Art 11 — Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. 

Drawing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 
discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to poster- 
making, lettering and everyday life needs. 

Art 113 — Ceramics (5-0-5). Laboratory fee: 82.00 

A beginner's course in the fundamentals of potter) and ela\ model- 
ing. Various ways of forming clay, decorating, glazing and firing 
suitable subjects. 

Art 114 — Ceramics (5-0-5). Laborator\ fee: $2.00 

A continuation of the beginner's course with emphasis on design, 
using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Wmk 
may be developed in pottery or clay sculpture. 

Art 115 — Drawing and Painting (5-0-5). Laboratorv fee. $2.00. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA\ WNAH 

\ course in the elements of pictorial composition, drawing and 
color. Basic work and experimentation will be conducted from still 
life, natural forms, and li\ing model-. Combined with the studio 
work will be discussions and reviews in history and appreciation of art. 

During latter course sessions, efforts will be made to provide 
special instruction to students desiring particular information on tech- 
niques and method-. 

Art 116 — Drawing and Painting (5-0-5). Laboratory fee ,$2.00. 

A continuation of Art 115. 



BIOLOGY 

Anatomy and Physiology \n-2n-?>n (2-2-3). Laboratory fee, S2.50 

A three-quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems are 
presented in order to give the student an understanding of the human 
body as a basis for further studies in clinical nursing. The labora- 
tor\ work includes some dissection of the lower vertebrates and ele- 
mentary experiments in physiology. I Not offered in 1956-57). 

Bacteriology \n-2n (2-2-3). Laboratory fee. S2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, protozoa and helminthes are 
considered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of eulturing 
bacteria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic 
procedures. (Not offered in 1956-57). 

Biology \\ I 111 I — General Botany (3-4-5). Fall. Laboratorv fee. 
$4.00. 

A stud\ of the structure of root.-, stems and leaves, basic physiology 
and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative species. 

Biology 12 (112) — General Botany (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $4.00. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

A study of the reproduction, heredit) and evolution of seed plants. 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes frequent field trips. 

Biology II (114) General Zaolog) (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey of the 
invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species of the 
basic invertebrate ph\ la. 



C01 RSI IH Si RIPTIONS I I 



Biology L5 (115) General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite: Biolog) II. 

Stud) .if vertebrate structurt and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. 

Biology MM General Zoology (3-6-6). Laboratory fee;, - 

Introduction to animal Structures and function and a SIHTej of the 

invertebrate phyla. Laborator) work on representative species oi 
each phylum. (Not offered in 1956-57). 

Biology I V/> General Zoology '3-6-6). Laboratory fee. I 
Prerequisite: Biolog) I I. 

Stud) <»f vetebrate structure and function, using -elected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. Concludes with a stud) of the 
principles of evolution and genetics. (Nol offered in 1956-57 i . 

Biology L6-17 i 116-117) — Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Four lectures and one demonstration period. 

\ non-laborator\ course beginning with a survey of the basic 
biological principle- and continuing with a stud\ of the structure and 
function of tbe human body. The second quarter is a continuation of 
the first and concludes with a stud) <>f the principle - ol genetics and evo- 
lution. No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

Biology 18-19 — Human inatomy and Physiology (3-4-5). Fall 
and Winter. Laboratory fee. $4.00 each quarter. 

\ twoquarter course considering the gross anatomy, histolog) and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laborator) work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physiol- 
ogy. Not for pre-medical and pre-dental student-. 

Biology 21 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Spring. Laborator) fee. 
$5.00. Prerequisites: Ten hours of a biological science with a labora- 
tory and fixe hours of inorganic chemistry. 

\n introduction to micro-organisms with primarx emphasis on 
bacteria. The morphology, life histor) and public health importance 
of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa and helminthes arc 
considered. 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate inatomy I .'->-(>-() I . Fall. 
Laboratory fee. $6.00. Prerequisite: Biolog) 1 1 and 15. 

\ -tudy of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems <»f the 
vertebrates. Laboratorx work on Squalid. Necturus and the cat. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration 24 (124)— Principles of Accounting. In- 
troductory i 5-0-5 I . 



44 ARMSTR ONG COLLEGE OF SA VWWH 

\n introduction to the fundanu ntal principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a stud) of the journal, the Ledger, accounting 
statement-, controlling accounts, special journals and the accounting 
s) stem. 

Business idministration L24a — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductorj (3-0-3). Summer only. < B. \. 121a and B. \. 1216 are 
identical to Business Administration 21 (124 1. 

\n introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures 

of accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, accounting 
statement.-, controlling account-, special journals and the acounting 
system. 

Business Administration 1246 — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductory ( 3-0-3 i . Summer only. 

Continuation of Business Administration 124a. 

Business Administration 25 I 125 i — Principles of Accounting. In- 
troductory (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 24. 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems >uch 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 125a — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductory 1 3-0-3 1 Summer only. (Business Administration 125a and 
Business Administration 1256 are identical to Business Administration 
25 1 125 I. 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 1256 — Principles of Accounting. Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. 

Continuation of Business Administration 125a. 

Business Administration 27 I 127 1 — Business Lou (5-0-5) 
Spring. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following sub- 
ject-. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance. 
rights of third parties and discharge. \genc\ : creation of an agency, lia- 
bilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: element- of 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Business idministration 28 I \'2\\\ —Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. 
The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the fol- 
lowing subjects which are of particular interest to those planning to 



( 01 RSE DESCRIF1 IONS 15 



major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, Liabilities "I 
partners, termination. Corporation: formation, power-, rights <»f se- 
curity holders, types of securities. Sale-: vesting <>f title, warrant-. 
remedies. 

Business [administration 2 l ) i L")i Cosi iccounting (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
and other concerns, stressing the securing of unit costs under hoth 

the order and the process methods. 

Business tdministration 3 1 (134) Principles o) Iccounting, In- 
termediate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 
Basic accounting lheor\ and the solution of problems requiring an 

application of accounting theory. 

Business Administration 35 (135) — Intermediate iccounting 
(5-0-5). Second course. Prerequisite: Business Administration 34 
I L34). 

\ continuation <>f Business Administration 34 (134) emphasizing 

the theories of valuation of fixed assets and liahilit\ accounts, the ap- 
plication of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared en the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 36 l 136 1 — Income Tax iccounting 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 i 1 25 i . 

\ -tudy of federal income tax laws and the application of these 
laws to the income tax returns of individuals, partnerships and corpor- 
ations. 

Business Administration 37 (137) — Tax Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 36 (136). 

A continuation of Business Administration 36 (136) with em- 
phasis on corporations and fiduciary returns and social securit) taxes, 

gift taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

A study of business correspondence, letter>. information reports, 

follow-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cation. Stress is placed upon the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Business Administration 116 — Report l\ riting. (5-0-5). 
Study and practice of effective English in business letter-, technical 
papers, engineering reports. Letters, reports, quizzes. 

Business Administrate 

motion (5-0-5). Prerequisites Economics 124. 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA> WWII 

\ course in retail advertising and sales promotion basically con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields emphasizing the psychology 
<»f advertising as a branch of -ales. The course explores the various 
media and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an 
advertising course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the 
average salesman. 

Business Administration 141 — -Advanced Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 35 I 135). 

A stud) of the problems of partnerships, parent and subsidiary ac- 
counting, consignments, installment accounting and other specialized 
accounting problem-. 

Business Administration 142 — Advanced Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 141. 

\ continuation of Business Administration 141. 

Business Administration 143 — Auditing Theory (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

Principles governing audits and audit procedure and a study of 
the practical application of accounting knowledge as applied to audit 
procedures. 

Business Administration 145 — C.P.A. Revieu (5-0-5). Prerequis- 
ite: Advanced Accounting and Auditing. 

\ re\ iew of the interpretation of the federal income tax law as 
applied to individuals, partnerships, estates and trusts: also a review 
of the methods of ascertaining and distributing cost in manufacturing 
concerns emphasizing the securing of costs under the job order, process 
and standard methods. 

Business Administration L51- Introduction to Transportation 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

History of transportation; developments leading to Legislative 
supervisipn of railroads: developments leading to Federal regulation 
of carriers, other than railroads: freight classifications: principles of 
freight rates and tariffs. 

Business Administration 152 Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 151 or per- 
mission <»f the instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application: special freight serv- 
ices; freighl claims, overcharge and loss and damage: freoght tariff 
circular-: construction and filing of tariffs: terminal facilities and 
switching; and demurrage. 



CO] RSE DESCRIPTIONS IT 

Business \dministration 153 Intermediate Rates and Tariffs 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 152. or per 
mission ol instructor. 

Reconsignmenl and diversion; transil privileges; rules governing 
stopping in transil shipments for partial unloading and to complete 
loading; weights, weighing, and paymenl ol freight charges; ware- 
housing and distribution; material handling; and packaging. 

Business idministration 154 tdvanced Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration L53, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Through routes and rates; milling in transil: technical tariff and 
rate interpretation: overcharges and undercharges; loss and damage 
claims: import ami export traffic: and classification committee pro- 
cedure. 

Business idministration 155— Interstate Commerce Law, (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration L54, or permission of 
the instructor. 

Evolution of Interstate Commerce Vet; construction of Interstate 

Commerce Act: interpretation and application of Interstate Commerce 
Act: application of penalties under the Interstate 1 Commerce Act: crea- 
tion and organization of Interstate Commerce Commission; practice 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business idministration 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission 
and Public Service Commission Procedure. (5-0-5) Spring. Prereq- 
uisite: Business Administration 156. or permission of the instructor. 

Practice before Interstate Commerce Commission; statutory au- 
thorit) for awarding damages: revision of Commission's decision: 
general review. 

Business .Idministration 160 — Principles of Management. (5-0 5) 
Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Business Administration 161 — Principles of Insurance. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 121. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 
tion of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted in- 
surance practices. 



48_ ARMSTRONG COLL EGE OF SAVA NNAH 

Business idministration L62 — Real Estate Principles. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics L24. 

\ consideration of the general principles of property utilization, 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens: the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulator) legislation. 



Chemistry 

Chemistry in — Chemistry for Nurses (4-2-5). Laboratory fee. 
12.50. Laboratory breakage. $3.00. ' :: ' 

Principles of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistr) with 
some special applications to nursing practice. I Not offered in 1956-57 I . 

Chemistry 11 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$3.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $3.00*. Pre-requisite: Two years of 
high school algebra. Mathematics 9. or consent of instructor. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and 
their applications. 

Chemistry 12 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Laboraton breakage fee. S3. 00*. Pre-requisite: Chemistry 
11. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 11. 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Spring. 
Laboratory fee. $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee, $5.00*. Pre-requisite: 
Chemistry 12. 

A study of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of com- 
mon cations and anions by semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 14 — General Inorganic i 5-3-6 i. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
Laborator) breakage fee. $3.00*. Prerequisite: Two years of high 
school algebra or Mathematics 10 or its equivalent. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and their 
applications. (Not offered in 1956-57). 

Chemistry 15 — General Inorganic i 5-3-6 I. Laborator) fee, $3.50. 
Laborator) breakage fee, $3.00.* Prerequisite: Chemistr) 14 or its 
equivalent. 

Continuation of Chemistn 14. (Not offered in 1956-57). 



Refundable at the end of each quarter if no item- lia\<- been lost or broken 
and all requirements of the laborator) nave been complied with. 



( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 19 



Chemistry 24 Qualitative Inorganic inalysU (3-6-5). Fall. Lab 
orator) fee, 15.00. Laborator) breakage fee, S5.00. ' Prerequisite: 
Chemistr) 15. L8 or its equivalent. 

\ stud) of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 
common cations and anion- l»\ semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 2'mi Quantitative inorganic inalysU I 2-6- 1 I . Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee, $5.00.* Pre-requisite: 
Chemistr) L3 or approval of the instructor. 

\ stud) of the fundamental theories and applications ol quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. No credit 
is given for this course before completion of Chemistr) 25b. 

Chemistry 256 — Quantitative Inorganic inalysis (1-6-3). Spring. 
Laborator) fee, $5.00. Laborator) breakage fee, $5.00.* Pre-requisite: 
Chemistr) 25a or its equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistn 25a. 



Commerce 

Commerce 11a — Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall and Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee. $3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and master) of the keyboard. An average speed of 30 words a minute 
is attained at the end of the first quarter. 

Commerce 116 — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). Winter 

and Spring. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

An average of 40 words a minute should be attained at the end 
of the second quarter. 

Commerce lie — Intermediate Typing. (0-5-2 1. Spring. Labora- 
tor) fee. S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce Wa-b or equivalent. 

\ typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

An average of 50 words a minute should be attained at the end 
of the third quarter. 

Commerce \2a-b — Beginning Shorthand I 5-0-5 i . Fall and Winter. 



* Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or broken 
and all requirements of the laboratory have been complied with. 



50 \ISMSTK(>\<; COLLEGE 01 SAVANNAH 



( bmplete theor) of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from Speed Studi< 

Commerce \'2< Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 
Dictation and transcription of nen and studied material Student 
i- required to take dictation at the rate of eight) words a minute. 

Commerce L3a Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The objective of tin- course is to build speed and accuracy in the 

operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thor- 
ough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the 
operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 136 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
\\ inter. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer t 0-5-2 l . 
Spring. Laboraton fee. $3.50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain, 
cipher, divisions, prorating cost and expenses, gross and do/en in in- 
\ oicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 21a — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 

business paper-. 

Commerce 216 — A continuation of Commerce 21fl (0-5-2). W in- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 216 (0-5-2 i. Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. \n average of 60 words is attained. 

Commerce 22a Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 
( lommerce 1 2^/. />. <■. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 



\ course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand arc applied 
in developing skill and accurac) in writing shorthand and in transcrib 
in»i. The first half \car is devoted to dictation of genera] business 

material: the second half, to dictation material applying to major 

\ ocations. 

Comment' 226 / continuation of ( ommerce 22a (5-0-5). W inter. 

Commerce 22c / continuation of Commerce 22l> (5-0-5). Spring. 
\ speed of 1 2n words a minute Is required. 

Commerce 2Mi- tdvanced Calculate) and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the ma- 
chine and business mathematics to the Following businesses: drugs, 
hardware, electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pa) roll. 
packing house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, depart- 
ment stores, hanks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 23b — A continuation oj Commerce 23a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee. -S3. .">(). 

Commerce 23c — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this last period. 



Economics 

Economics 21 1 121 1 — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

A stud\ of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 (124) — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 21. 

A continuation of the stud) of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 21. 

Economics 125 — Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5). 

An introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart making: elementary 
statistical procedures and their economic interpretation: introduction 
to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 126 — American Economic History (5-0-5). 



52 \li\l>™>\<. ( < > I I I < , I ol >\\ WWII 



The growth and development of economic institutions in the 

I nited States from the colonial period to tin present with majoi 
emphasis on the period since L860. It will deal will; agriculture, in- 
dustry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, mone\ 
and banking, and finance. 

Economics 127 — Money and Banking (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics I 2 I. 

The role of mone\ in the economic organization: inonetan theor\ : 
methods of stabilizing the price level; the integration of financial in- 
stitutions; theorx of hank deposits and elasticity of bank currency : 
discount polic) and the interest rate of central hanks: methods of 
regulating credit and business activities. 



Economics 128 — Principles of Marketing (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 124. 

Principles and methods invoked in the movement of good- and 
services from producers to consumers: marketing functions; marketing 
manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products: pro- 
posals for improving the marketing structure. 

Economics 129 — Labor Economics (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 124. 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern labor 
organizations and their remarkable growth in recent years. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects 
of our labor problems including the studv of wages, working condi- 
tions, unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hours, 
workers welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future 
developments along these lines. 

Economics 130 — Personnel Administration I 5-0-5 l . Prerequisites: 
Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

A stud\ of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
istration of human relations and Industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded per- 
sonnel program. 

Economics 13] -Government and Business (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 124. 

\ general surve) of the economic aspects of business regulation 

l>\ the government, with specific reference to regulator) developments 
and method- in the I nited States: other activities affecting business 
in general, a- extension of loans and subsidies, maintenance of fact- 
finding agencies and government owned corporations. 



CO] RSE DESCRIPTIONS 
Economics L32 Investments. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 



\ >tud\ <it stocks and I »« >!u l>. market operations, investment mathe- 
matics, investment policies and financial statements. 

Education 

Education II Orientation to Education (5-0-5). Fall. 

For the beginning or prospective teacher, i h i > subject offers a 
broad understanding of the American spirit in education, the plate oi 
the school in society, its growth and changing function as a social in- 
stitution. The problem and discussion approach is used. 

Engineering 

Engineering 11 (111) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of studs include lettering: the use of the instruments: 
orthographic projection: au\iliar\ views; sections and conventions. 

Engineering 12 ill2l — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions: dimensions: pic- 
torial representation: threads and fastenings: shop processes; technical 
sketching: working drawings: pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 112a — Engineering Drawing (0-3-lV>). Summer. 

Topics of stud) include drawing conventions; dimensions: pic- 
torial representation: threads and fastenings: shop processes; technical 
sketching: working drawings; pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 112b — Engineering Drawing (0-3-1^). Summer. 
Continuation of Engineering 112a. 

Engineering 13 (113) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings: 
working drawings: ink tracing on cloth: working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 19 (119) — Applied Descriptive Geometry (0-6-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines, and planes by use of auxiliary views: the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes b\ revolution methods: simple inter- 
sections: developments of surfaces: an introduction to warped surfaces. 
Practical applications are emphasized. 



54 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



English 

Students will b< assigned t<» freshman English according to result- 
of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

English I 1 \ (114A) Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. 

This course includes theme writing, with emphasis <»n correct and 
forceful expression. The student also reads and discusses such works 
as the Iliad, the Odyssey, and plays by Aeschylus. Sophocles and Euri- 
pedes. 

English 14B (114Bl — Freshman English I 5-0-5 I . Fall. Winter. 

This course is essentially the same as English 14A. but more time is 
devoted to grammar, punctuation and spelling. In theme writing, em- 
phasis is placed on clarity of communication. 

English 15A (115A) — A continuation of English 14A (5-0-5). 
Fall. Winter and Spring. 

The student reads and discusses selections from such authors as 
Montaigne. Swift. Dickens and English and American poets. Theme 
writing is continued with practice in preparing documented papers. 

English 15B (115Bl — A continuation of English 14B (5-0-5). Win- 
ter. Spring. 

This course is essentially the same as English 15A, but more time 
is given to correct expression in writing. A documented paper is pre- 
pared. 

English 21 I 121 I — Sophomore English — World Literature (5-0-5). 
Fall and Winter. 

\ stud) is made of some of the works of Shakespeare. Goethe's 
Faust, and s< lections from the Bible. 

English 22 (122) — Sophomore English — // orld Literature (5-0-5 I. 
Winter and Spring. 

Selected modern poetry, drama and novels are read, both American 
and European. 

English 24 In Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 
\ stud) of the various types and forms of poetr) with special 
emphasis on more recent poetry. 



English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Fall. (Not offered in 
L956-57). 

\ surve) oi American literature and culture. Each student is 
a-ked to select one particular period or area or author for concentra- 



( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



tion, making reports and writing papers in thai phase <»t the work. 
The course is primarily conducted l»\ reading and discussion. 

English 27 1/ odern Drama (5-0-5). Fall. 

Class reading and discussion of modern plays from Ibsen's 
"Ghosts" to Miller's "Death of a Salesman.' 1 The course is centered 

on appreciation of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 
reading -elected plays aloud. 

English 2o Fundamentals oj Speech (5-0-5). Winter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gi\e> some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, pho- 
netics, gesture, articulation, pronounciation, and regional speech dif- 
ferences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the fundamentals 
of speech through a wide variet) of formal, informal, extemporaneous 
impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 30 — Principles of Theatre Art (5-0-5). Spring. 
\ -huh and discussion of the fundamentals involved in the devel- 
opment of dramatic art and in the staging method- which have been and 
are now utilized in producing drama. The course will develop chrono- 
logically and will relate directh to historical events and to the changing 
form and method of writing for the stage. 



French 

French 11-12 (111-112! — Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

A course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well 
as grammar and reading. No credit for graduation will be given until 
the sequence is completed. 

French 21 (121) — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 I 122 I — Intermediate French, continued I 5-0-5 I . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three vears of high 

A survey course . Reading of texts, written and oral reports on 
collateral reading. 



56 akmstrov; COLLKCiK ok savannah 



French 24 French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22. 

Selected plays of Gorneille. Moliere and Racine. 

Geography 

Geography 111 — World Human Geography (5-0-5). 

\ sur\e\ of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographaic features, distribution of economic activities 
and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequac) of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

German 

German 11-12 (111-112) — Beginning German (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

Drill upon pronounciation and elements of grammar, conversation, 
and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as much 
as practicable in the classroom instruction. The idiomatic use of the 
language will be studied. Reading of texts and translations. Conversa- 
tion, dictation, and dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

German 21 (121) — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring. 

Grammar review and comparative grammar studied with the view 
of enabling students to write compositions. Short stories, life situations 
in Germain. German magazines, memorization of famous German 
songs. Conversation and dialogues. 

Health 

Health 111 — Personal and Community Health Problems (5-0-5). 

This course considers the meaning of health and factors influencing 
health behavior; health problems as related to the individual: overview 
of world, national, state and local health problems: community health 
organizations; mobilizing and evaluating community health resources. 
The legal aspects in community health and the laws governing re- 
portable diseases is given special attention. 

History 

History 11 illh in Historical Introduction to Contemporary 
Civilization I 5-0-5 i . Fall. Winter, and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological surve) of the main currents 
oi political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western Civi- 






C01 RSE Dl S< KIN IONS 57 



Ization from t h«- period of the sixth centur) in Greece to the present 
time. 

History L5 I L15) / continuation <>l History I I (5-0-5). Wintei 
and Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, tin* dynamics of Western Civilization arc studied in 
work- of the following authors: Plato, Dante. Machiavelli, Descartes, 
Locke, Jefferson, Rousseau, Vdam Smith. Malthus, Marx and others. 

History 2r> (125) Recent European History (5-0-5). Winter. 
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 

stud) of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about L870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 
voted to the first World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing that war and the complex of world events which preceded the Sec- 
ond World War. 

History 26 1 126 1 — Recent American History (5-0-5). Kail. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in \meri- 
can life from about L865 to the present time. 

Home Economics 

Home Economics In — Nutrition and Food Preparation (3-2-4). 
W inter. Laboratory fee, S4.00. 

\ -tudy of the laws governing the food requirements of human 
beings for maintenance of growth, activity, reproduction, and lactation. 
Complete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 10 — Orientations: Careers and Personal Develop- 
ment (5-0-5). Fall. 

The many oppourtunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 
and others will be discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
\isit the class to show the many vocations dealing with the home. 

How to be more attractive through personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics 11 (111) — Clothing I 2-6-5 I . Wintei. 
Planning and making individual wardrobes. Fashion-, design and 
fabrics are studied. Laboratorv fee. S2.00. 

Home Economics 12 — Foods (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory fee. 
$7.00. 



58 ARMSTR<)\<, COLLEGE OF SAVA.W \H 



I In- course is based <>n t h< ■ human food needs. Preparation and 
attractive Berving of meals is studied. 

Home Economics 21 Home Furnishings (4-2-5). Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee, v 2.o(). 

The interior and exu rior planning of the home is studied. Em- 
phasis i- placed on style of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economics 23 — Elementary Textiles and Clothing for the 
Family (2-6-5). Spring. Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

Practical application of elementar) textile study to the selection 
and use of clothing for the family. 

Home Economics 24 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). fall. 
A course in the famih with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

Library Science 

Library Science 11 — Library Usage. (1-0-1 1. 

A one hour course in the use of the Library. A practical survey of 
library books, resources, tools and services, designed to aid the college 
student in his study- reasearch. and recreation reading. Practice in the 
use of the card catalog. Readers Guide and reference books. Prepara- 
tion of a bibliography by methods of research. 

Students who pass an entrance examination with a grade of at 
least 70 per cent will be exempt from this course. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 9 (109 1 — Intermediate ilgebra (5-0-5). Fall and 
Spring. 

i Students will not receive college credit for this course if they 
have completed two units of high school credit in algebra. I 

This course includes a study of fractions, signed numbers, linear 
and quadratic equations, ratio, proportion, variation and graphs. 

Mathematics lo (110) Basic Skills in Mathematics (5-0-5). 

(Not open to students who have high school credit for two years 
of algebra and one of plane geometry.) 

This course provides an opportunit) for the student to acquire 
basic skills in mathematics necessar) to meet the common demands of 
various college program-. 

Topics from plane geometry include the properties of such geo- 
metric figures a> polygons, triangles and circles. 



C01 IM DESCRIPTIONS 59 



Topics from algebra include fractions, signed numbers, lineai 
equations, ratio, proportions, variation, and graphs. (Not offered in 
1956-57), 

Mathematics 16 (116) College ilgebra (5-0-5). Fall and Win 
ter. Prerequisite: Two units <>f high school algebra <>i Mathematics 9. 

The course consists <>f functions and graphs, logarithms, linear and 
quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and the 
elemental - ) theor) of equations. 

Mathematics 17 iI17i Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

\ course covering the solution <>f the right and general triangle, the 
solution of trigonometric equations, proof of trigonometric identities, 
graphs of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions. 

Mathematics 18 (118) — Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, elemental") conic Bei 
tions, polar coordinates, transcendental curves and transformation of 

coordinates. (Not offered in 1956-571. 

Mathematics 19 (119) — Mathematics of Finance (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The necessar) 
aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be studied. 

Mathematics 20 (120) — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometr) of the point and the line, graphs of functions, 
limits, differentiation of algebraic functions and some applications 
of derivatives. 

Mathematics 21 (121) — Calculus (5-0-5). Fall Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 20. 

This course includes the differentiation and integration of poly- 
nomials, problems in maxima and minima, approximations l»\ dfferen- 
tials. areas, volumes, centroids, momenl <»f inertia and work. 

Mathematics 22 ( 122 ) —Calculus i 5-0-5 I . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

A continuation of Mathematics 21. This course includes differen- 
tiation of transcendental functions with application to rates, velocit) 



60 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA VWWH 

and acceleration, curvature and Newton's Method. It also includes for- 
mula- and methods of integration. 

Mathematics 23 (123) — Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 

\ continuation of Mathematics 22. This course include- Simpson's 

rule, inderterminate form-, -cries, hyperbolic function-, partial deriva- 
til es and multiple integral-. 

Mathematics L08 — Plane Geometry (5-0-5). 

Topics of stud\ include rectilinear figures, congruent triangle-, the 
circle, similar figures and polygons. (Students will not receive college 
credit for this course if the\ have completed one unit of high school 
credit in geometry. I 

Mathematics 114 — The Slide Rule (1-2-2). 

\n intensive stud\ and practice in the use of all scales including 
the solutions of problems using the trigonometric scales. 

Music 

\Iusic 11 — Elementary and Sight Reading i. 5-0-5 l. Fall. 

\ course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dic- 
tation, melod) writing and an introduction to elementary harmoin are 
included. 

Music 12 — Theory and Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 11. 

\ continuation of Music 11. with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20— Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

\ course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great period- of musical art. Lecture-, discussions and re- 
i orded sessions comprise the course. 

Musi, L15-116-117 — Appreciation o) Music (2-0-2). 

Courses designed lor the musical!} untrained who wish an intelli- 
gent understanding of the art of music. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded listening sessions comprise the course. (Not offered in l ( Jr>6- 
57). 



uons compru 



Music L8a Piano I L-0-2). 

Beginning or intermediate piano for the adult student. One hour 
[< — n pei week. Special fee — $45.00. 



(Ol RSE DESCRIPTIONS 61 



Music U>l> Piano. \ continuation of Music L8a (1-0-2). 

Music L8c Piano. I continuation of Music lol>. I L-0-2). 

Music 21a Voice. I L-0-2). 

Fundamental instruction in voice production, diction, articulation. 
breath control, physical and mental poise, applied in tin- stud) of songs. 

One hour lesson per week. Special fee. $45.00. 

Music 21h-- / oicc. \ continuation of Music -la. I L-0-2). 

Music 21c / one. I continuation of Music 2II» (1-0-2). 

i No practice facilities are available at the college. The student 
must have access to private practice facilities in order to enroll for ap- 
plied music courses. I 

Philosophy 

Philosophy 110 — Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5). 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of phil- 
osophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the relation 
of philosophy to art. science and religion. Includes a survey of the 
basic issues and major types in philosophy, and shows their sources 
in experience, historx and representative thinkers. 

Philosophy 111-112-113 — Introduction to Philosophy. 1 2-0-2 1. 
(Not offered in 1956-57 I . 

\n informal discussion of the thinking of certain Greek. Roman. 
Earl) Christian Renaissance and modern writers. 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 11 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, dual combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elemenatry Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball I L-3-2). Winter. 
Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or the equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 — First Aid and Safety Education I 1 
Winter. Elective Credit. 



62 VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF S WANNAH 



The American Red Cross standard course in firsl aid is followed 
l»\ a broad consideration ol the opportunities for safet) teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 22— Elementary Boxing for Hen (0-3-1). 
\\ inter. 

Physical Education 23 Senior Life Saving and Instructors 1 Course 
in Swimming i 2-3-2 i . Spring. 

Physical Education 24 — Boxing for Teachers i 2-3-2 i . Winter. 

Physical Education 25- Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 26 — Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 27 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1 >. \\ inter. 

Physical Education 28 Adult Recreative Sj>or/s (0-3-1 I. Spring. 
Consists of passive, semi-active and active games and -port- which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 — Folk Rhythms for Teachers I 2-3-2 I . Fall. 
This course consists of adanced training in folk dances and prac- 
tice teaching of those dances. 

Physical Education 30 — Archery (0-3-1) Spring. 

Physical Education SI — Wrestling for Mien (0-3-1). Winter. 



Physical Science 

Physical Science 11 i I 1 1 i (5-0-5). Fall. No prerequisite. 

\ stud) <>f the scientific method and its use in the attempt of man 
to describe and explain the nature of the physical universe. This will 
include the stud) of fundamentals of physics and astronomy with some 
example of the application- of this knowledge in providing a better 
Living for man. \n attempt is made to go from the stud\ of the large 
universe to the stud) of the small fundamental particles of which this 
uni\ erse is composed. 

Physical Science 12 (112) (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Physical 
Science I 1 . 

\ continuation of Physical Science 11. In thi< course emphasis 
is placed on the stud) of the principles of inorganic and organic chem- 
istr) with some example of the application of chemistr) in household. 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 



( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 

structure of the fundamental particles of matter (atoms and molecules) 
i> used in the stud) of ilir classification <>t the simple components "I 
matter (elements) and the changes which tin \ undergo to form more 
complex substances (compounds). 

Physics 

Physics 11 i 111 i General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: a course in college mathematics or consenl 
of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and Laboratory work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 i112i — General Physics (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 11 or consenl of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 

the fields of electricity, sound and light. 

Physics 21 (121)— Mechanics I 5-3-6 I . Fall. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisite: Mathematics L8. 

An intensive course in mechanics. The course include- the stud\ 
of statics, kinetics, energy, power, friction, machine-, elasticity, hy- 
drostatics and mechanics of gases. 

Physics 22 (122l — Electricity (5-3-6). Winter. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisite-: Mathematics 21 and Phys- 
ics 21. 

The course includes the stud) of magnetism, electrostatics, current 
electricity and its effect and some electrical instrument-. 

Physics 23 I 123 I — Heat. Sound and Light (5-3-6). Spring. 

Laborator) fee: $2.50. Prerequisite-: Mathematics 21 and 
Physics 22. 

This course includes basic concepts in heat and thermodynamics, 
sound, properties of light and a stud) of some optical instrument-. 

Political Science 

Political Science 12 I 112) — The Governments of Foreign /'oners 
(5-0-5). 

\ stud) is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments, i Not offered in day session L956-1957.) 

Political Science 13 (113) — Government of the United States 
(5-0-5). Fall. Winter and Spring. 



64 VRMSTROV; COLLIKiK <>l S\\ \W \li 



\ stud) i> made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 
government III the United Slates and some of the major problems of 
the state and local government. The course shows how developmental 
practice ha> created our government as it stands today. 

Psychology 
Psychology in (5-0-5). 

This course is an introduction to the stud\ of human behavior with 
emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. The im- 
portance of the nurses" own personality is stressed. (Not offered in 
L956-57). 

Psychology 20 (120) — Applied Psychology (5-0-5) Fall. 

This course is an orientation into college and into the choice of a 
career. The objective aids developed in the field of psychology will be 
used to discover effective ways of learning in general, and of studying 
in the college setting. Methods of objective measurement of a person's 
intelligence, interests, special aptitudes and personality traits will be 
explored and demonstrated. These will be applied to problems of edu- 
cational, vocational, and special interest training. For persons already 
in employment, special problems of personnel management and produc- 
tion output may be studied by modern psychological principles and 
techniques. Insofar as possible each student will have an opportunity to 
develop projects in these fields that will be useful in his own plans for 
education and career. 

Pi >y chology 21a (121a) — Introductory Psychology (5-0-5 l. Win- 
ter. 

This course introduces the student to how the basic psychological 
processes operate and affect the behavior of the individual. Facts about 
patterns of growth from birth to maturity, learning to observe and deal 
objective!) with the real world, having motivation, emotions, conflict 
and frustration are explored and applied to the student's present daily 
experience. Special study is given to unconscious influences on be- 
havior in the stud) of mechanisms of defense and ways of directing 
these processes into more realistic and creative use of ones feelings. 
understandings and actions. By the end of the course the student i> 
expected to be able to see these processes at work in a given example of 
behavior and to begin to see the interaction of all of these processes in 
a given act or experience. In the seminar type of class discussion the 
focus is on one of these topics. The discussion objective is for each 
student, after study, to share his concept of the topic or some phase 
of it. link it with the information in the text, and test it against his 
« m n experiences. 

Psychology 21b il21l»i Experimental Psychology 1 5-0-5) . 
Spring. Prerequisite: Psychology 21a (121a). 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



In this course the principles explained 
tested and explored b) Bpecial projects and experimentation. Each 
Stlldenl will Select from a choice oi topics introduced in 21a at leasl one 
systematic experiment and one live project, develop bis plan of pro- 
cedure, can\ « uit bis stud) according to approved objective methods 

and prepare a satisfactory written report. Class time will be used for 

group consultation in ordei thai each member will follow the work 
of each other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. Top- 
ics suitable for a Bpecial stud) project include aspects of child develop- 
ment oi special behavior aspects of children, maturation, emotions, 
conflict, frustration-, mechanisms of defense, sensor) processes, per- 
ception, learning, remembering, thinking, peronalit) adjustment 

Psychology 22 (122) — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Kail. Pre 
requisite: Psychology 21a I 121a I or consent of instructor. 

This course centers on a stud\ of the individual's interaction with 
hi- social groups (family, friendship groups, clubs, church group-, ((im- 
munity groups!. Forces of need, emotion and interests that hind the 
individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group interaction are 
analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used for experiencing 
the processes of communication and interaction in a group setting. 
Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, group conflicts, social 
stratification, mass communication, propaganda, public opinion forma- 
tion and methods of changing group patterns are studied, both b) con- 
sulting the reports of responsible studies and by group project-. 

Psychology 23 i 123 I — Child Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

This course offers a study of the developmental factors operating 
in a child's experience which make for. or interfere with, effective ex- 
pression of his capacities and adjustments to life stiuations. Sources 
are drawn from experimental research and from findings of analytic 
psychology. Direct observation of children individually and in a nur- 
sery is used as a source of class discussion. I Not offered in 1956-57 I . 

Psychology 25 ( 125 I — Psychology of Adjustment. I 5-0-5 I . 
The class setting is used in this course for direct experience of the 
use of group discussion for self-understanding. This is supplemented 
b) -\stematic written self-analysis. (Not offered in 1956-57). 



Social Science 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce: population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 



66 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Sociology 

Sociology \n Elementary Sociolog') (5-0-5). 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology; (2) the 
nurse as a citizen <»f the community and as a professional worker: (3) 
the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the com- 
munity; I 1- 1 the patient in tin hospital coining from the family and 
returning to the family. (Not offered in L956-57). 

Sociology 20a (120a) — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter 

Sociology is a study of the social behavior of people as they inter- 
act with each other. This course presents information which has been 
gathered by systematic and scientific studies of human society. Material 
is drawn from Social Psychology on how an individual is "socialized" to 
interact with other people within his culture. This leads to some ob- 
jectve study of population patterns and the special distribution of peo- 
ple, occupational patterns of human communities, traits and characteris- 
tics of culture groups, typical features of group behavior and of the 
effect of mass communication on public opinion. Looking at mankind 
as a whole, his institutions of family, religion, economic behavior and 
political behavior are studed as stable patterns for meeting basic human 
needs, and as infinitely varied patterns adapted to the needs of different 
human groups. This introduction to sociology is successful if it 
leads the student into a more informed identification with wider seg- 
ments of the human family and if he gains respect for objective methods 
of fact-gathering in his efforts to understand his human environment. 

Sociology 20b (120b) — Social Problems (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Sociology 20a (120a I. 

In this course the principles explored in Sociology 20a will be ex- 
plored in planned projects of social research, supervised participation 
and/or analysis of local community resources. These will take form in 
accordance with student interest and actual cooperative resources of 
community organizations and personnel. Suggested areas of study 
are the fields of health (physical and mental), poverty, employment, 
education, government, crime (juvenile and adult I. dependent children. 
housing, recreation, resources for the aged and others that reveal com- 
munity problems or programs. Class time will he used for group consul- 
tation in order that each member will follow the work of each other 
Student and for use of class guidance and criticism. At the end of the 
course a practical analysis will be made of how social change takes place 
in a community, with attention to the implications for change in nation- 
al and international oinmunities. For those who elect the Human Re- 
lations Concentration, a special seminar will he held at the end of this 
course f<»r evaluating the -Indent-" experience in the whole Human Re- 
lations sequence. 



( 01 UH M S< RIPTIONS 67 



Sociology 21 (121) Marriage and the Family. (5-0-5). Fall 
and Spring. 

This course first introduces the student t<> the basic uniformities 
yet infinite varieties of human families. He selects for studying the 
famil) pattern in a culture different from his own, and then Btudies the 
impact ol oui <>un culture as it influences the roles and interactions <d 
a famil) that In knows well. This should give some sociological under- 
standing "t the famil) as a cultural institution. Tin' resl of tin course 
focuses on the individual within our culture growing and learning to 
love in a mature marital union. The earl) childhood [earnings which af- 
fect basic altitude- toward parent-, authority, the giving and receiving 
of love, and anger are presented from the findings of analytic psychol- 
ogy. Mien cadi stage in the preparation for marriage is discussed: 
dating, courting, engagement, marriage, adjustment to money, sex, re- 
ligion, in-laws, friend- and children. Some practical studies of budget, 
house planning, settling differences, using help. etc. are worked out a? 
projects. \ prominenf physician is guest lecturer on specialized infor- 
mation affecting the physical adjustment to marriage and parenthood. 
Through the process of free discussion- in the group, the students begin 
to experience the "give and take" that grows into honest) and mutual 
respect. The experience of this process i- used as a way of Learning 
the reciprocal interaction that is basic to mature love of another person. 



Spanish 

Spanish 111-112 — Elementary (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. 

Spanish 121 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 
Phis course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar and to delve into the fine point- of [he 
language. 

Spanish 122 — Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students facilit) in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpiece- of Spanish litera- 
ture and current Spanish newspapers are read. 



University of Georgia Extension Courses 

The classes listed below are Universit) of Georgia Extension 
courses. See under "Fees" the extra charges to enroll in these cL 



<>;; 



VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 





Business Ad 


ministrat 


BUSUM B£ 


Administration 


E-311 


Business 


Administral ion 


E-351 


Business 


Administration 


E-370 


Business 


Administration 


E-371 


Business 


Administration 


E-390 


Business 


Administration 


E.515 


Busim ss 


Administration 


E-519 


Economics 


E-312 


Econoini( s 


. E-326 


Economic 




... E-360 


Economic 


- 


E-386 


Economic s 


E-431 


Economic 


R 


E-444 



ion and Economics 

Introductory Cosl Accounting (5-0-5) 
Principles of 

Organization & Management (5-0-5) 

Business Law, ftrsl < 5-0-5) 

Business Law. second I 5-0-5 1 

K.al Estate Principles (5-0-5) 

[ncome Tax Accounting (5-0-5) 

Tax Accounting (5-0-5} 

Elementary Economic Statistics '5-0-5) 

Money and Banking (5-0-5) 

Principles of Marketing < 5-0-5) 

Labor Economics (5-0-5) 

Investments (5-0-5) 

Government and Business (5-0-5) 



Classics 



Classical Culture E-301x 

Classical Culture E-301\ 



Creek Culture 
Latin Culture 



( 5-0.5 > 
< 5-0-5 ) 



English 
English 
English 
English 



English 

E-303 English Literature to 1800 (5-0-5) 

E-304 English Literature after 1800 (5-0-5) 

E-343 Contemporary Drama (5-0-5) 

E-411 Children's Literature (5-0-5) 



(reography 



Geography 

E-101 World Human Geography 



(5-0-5) 



History 
History 



History 

E-350x American History to 1865 (5-0-5) 

E-350x American Histrv since 1865 < 5-0.5' 



Health Educath 



Health Education 

E-344 Problems in School 

Health Education 



(5-0-5) 



Mathemati 



Mathematics 

E-102 Mathematics of Finan< 



(3-0-3) 



Musi< 
Music 



Music 

E-302 Methods oi Teaching 

Public School Musi< 

E-312 Public School Music 

For Elemental \ Grades 



Economics 12] and 121 arc prerequisites to all advanced courses 
oomics ami business administration, except b) special permission of the in- 



( 5-0-5) 


(5-0-5) 


in eco- 


t rue tor. 






( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



69 



Physical Science 



Physical Science 



(5-0.5) 



Political Science 



Political Science 

K-l American Governmenl 



1 5-0-5 » 



Psychology 
Psychology 



Psychology 

\\-\W Psychology of Personnel 
I&423 Abnormal Psychology 



( 5-0-5 ) 
(5-0-5) 



Social Science 



Social Science 

.... E-4 Contemporary I •■ oi gia 



1 5-0.5 ' 



Sociology 
Sociology 



Sociology 

E-315 The Field of Social Work (5-0-5 » 

E-360 Contemporary Social Problem- (5-0*5) 



Speech 



Speech 

E-8 Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5) 



INDEX 

Admission b) Examination 13 

Admission to Class 23 

Admission to College 12-14 

Admission to Special Students 14 

Admission to Transient Students 14 

Admission to Veterans 13-14 

Administration 3 

Admission by Transfer 13 

\d\ isement and Placement Tests 22 

Aims 11-12 

Art. Course Descriptions 41-42 

Assemblies 25 

Associate in Arts 27 

Athletics 21 

Attendance Regulations 24-25 

Audio-Visual Instruction 19 

Biology- Course Descriptions 42-43 

Business Administration. Course Descriptions 43-48 

Business Administration. Senior College Preparatory 28 

Business Administration. Terminal 34-37 

Business Administration. l-\ear Program 37 

Business Administration. 3-Year Program: 

Accounting 34 

General 35 

Calendar— 1956-1957 2 

Certificate. Admission by 12-13 

Chemistry. Course Descriptions 48-49 

College Commission 3 

Commencement Exercises 20 

Commerce. Course Descriptions 49-51 

Commerce. Secretarial. Terminal 37 

Conduct 23 

Core Curriculum 27 

Counseling 16 

Course Load 22 

Course Descriptions 42-67 

Course Numbers ... 41 
Curriculums: 

Senior College Preparator) 28-34 

Terminal Programs 34-40 

Dean's List 23-24 

Dismissal 25-26 



INDIA (Continued) 

Economics, Course Descriptions 51-53 

Education, Course Description 53 

Engineering, Senior College Preparatory 2.'i 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 53 

English, Course Descriptions 54*55 

Evening College L7-18 

Extension Courses, I niversit) of (Georgia 67-69 

Extension Courses Credit at the University of Georgia 19 

Faeulh 3-9 

Fees 14-16 

Forestry, Senior College Preparatory 28-29 

French, Course Description- 55-56 

General Regulations 22 

Geography. Course Descriptions 56 

German. Course Descriptions 56 

Glee Club 21 

Grades 23 

Graduation. Requirements for 26 

Health. Course Descriptions 56 

History of the College 11 

History. Course Descriptions 56-57 

Hodgson Hall 16 

Holidays 2 

Home Economics. Course Descriptions 57-58 

Home Economics. Senior College Preparatory 29 

Home Economics. Terminal 37 

Honors 23-24 

Human Relations. Terminal 38 

Industrial Management 29 

Liberal Arts. Senior College Preparatory 30 

Liberal Arts. Terminal 38-39 

Library 16-17 

Library Science. Course Description 58 

Masquers 21 

Mathematics. Course Descriptions 58-60 

Mathematics. Senior College Preparatory 30 

Medical Technologists. Savannah School of 39 

Medical Technology, Senior College Preparatory 30-31 

Medical Technology. Terminal 39 

Music. Course Descriptions 60-61 

Night School (see Evening College) 17-18 

Nursing. 1-Year Program 39-40 



INDFA (Continued) 



Organization of the College 
Orientation and \dvisemen1 
Philosophy 



Physical Education 

I Musical Education, Course Descriptions 

Physical Education. Senior College Preparatory 

Physical Examination 

Physical Science 

Physics. Course Descriptions 

Physics. Senior College Preparatory 

Placement Service 

Placement Tests 

Political Science. Course Descriptions 

Pre-Dental 

Pre-Medical 

Pre-Nursing. Senior College Preparatory 

Pre-Optometry 

Pre-Pharmacy 

Pre-Veterinary, Senior College Preparatory 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 

Publications 

Recommendations 

Refunds 

Reports and Grades 

Requirements for Graduation 

Scholarships 

Senior College Courses 

Social Science, Contemporary Georgia 
Sociology, Course Descriptions 

Spanish. Course Descriptions 

Stenographic, 1-Year Program 
Student Activities 

Student Assistants 

Student Center 

Summer School Calendar 

Peaching, Senior College Preparatory 

Transfer to Other Institutions 

Transient Students 

Transportation. Terminal 

University of Georgia. Extension Courses 
\\ ithdrawal from College 



11 
16 
61 
21 

61-62 
31 
22 

62-63 
63 
31 
20 
22 

63-64 
32 
32 
30 
33 
33 
33 

64-65 
21 
26 

15-16 
23 
26 

19-20 

18-19 
65 

66-67 
67 
40 

20-21 
19 
20 
2 
34 
27 
14 

36-37 

67-69 
25 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong College 
of Savannah 



Savannah, Georgia 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 




1957-1958 



SI MMER FALL WINTKIi SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 



A City Supported Junior College 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 




18818 



Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia ColI< ■_ 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XXII NUMBER I 



ARMSTRONG COLLEG& 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR L957-1958 

SI MMIIJ SESSION 
L957 



Firsl Term 



Registration 

i lass< - begin 

Lasl da) t<> register foi credit 

Mid-term n ports due 

llo!i(la\ 
Examinations 



Registration 
Qasses begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Holiday 
Examinations 



Evening < olleg( 

\\ ednesda) . .1 une 12 

Thursday, June 13 

Friday, June 1 1 

\\ • dnesday, July 3 

Thursday, Jul) l 

Thursday, Jul) 27 



Second Term 



Monday, July 29 

Tuesday, Jul) 30 

Wednesday, .lul> .'^1 

Friday, Vugusl ]<> 

Monday. September 2 

Friday. September 6 



FALL QUARTER 



Fn shman testing 

Sophomore counseling 

Freshman orientation and registration 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-registration for winter quarter 

Thanksgiving holidays 

Examinations 

Homecoming: 

Basketball Game 

Reception and Dance 
Christmas holidays 



Monday, September In 

Tuesday. September 17 

Tuesday thru Friday. September 17-20 
Monday. September 23 

Tuesda) . Septi mber 2 1 

Friday. September 27 

Friday. October 25 

Monday thru Wednesday, November 18-20 

Thursday thru Sun. lav. Nov. 28 Dec. 1 

Mondav thru Wednesday, December 'Ml 



Thur>dj 



Saturday. December 1 1 

Friday, December 20 

Dec. 12 thru \\ ednesday, Jan. 1 



WINTER QUARTER 

Registration Thursday, Januar) 2 

Classes begin Friday. Januar) 3 

Last day to register for credit Wednesday, January 8 

Mid-term reports due Wednesday, February 5 

Pr -registration for spring quarter Mondav thru Wednesday, Februar) 24-26 

Examinations Wednesday thru Friday. March 12-14 

Spring holidays Saturday thru Tuesday, March 15-18 



SPRING ol \RTER 

Registration Wednesday, March 19 

( ' la--«-- begin Thursday, March 20 

Lasl < !a> to register for credit Tuesday, March 25 

Mid-Term reports due Wednesday, April 23 

Pre-registration for summer and fall quarters Wednesday thru Friday, May 7-9 
Examinations Wednesday thru Friday. May 28-30 

Sophomore Beach Party Monday, June 2 

Graduation Wednesday, June 4 

SUMMER SESSION 
1958 
First Term Evening Coll gi 

Registration Friday, June 6 

Examinations Thursday. July 17 

Second Term 

Registration Monday, July 21 

Examinations Friday, August 29 






Administration 

The College Commission 

HERSCHEL V. JENKINS Chairman 

Victor B. Jenkins Vice-Chairman 

Stephen K. Myers, Ex-Officio Herbert L. Kayton 
William A. Early, Ex-Officio Alexander A. Lawrence, Ex-Officio 
H. Lee Fulton. Jr., Ex-Officio W. Lee Mingledorff, Jr., Ex-Officio 
Joseph H. Harrison Dr. Helen A. Sharpley 

Fred Wessels, Jr. 

Administrative Staff aiul Faculty 

Foreman M. Hawes, A. B., M. S President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. Vice-President-Director 

of the Evening College 

Jule C. Rossiter, Associate IN Arts Secretary & Treasurer 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A Registrar 

Mary Strong, A.B. 

Coordinator for the Technical Institute Program 

Lutrecia Adams, B.S. and M. A., Peabody College 
Instructor in Biology 

Avis G. Barnes, B.S., University of Georgia 

Chemistry Laboratory Instructor 
Instructor in Biology 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia. 

Instructor in History 

Jane Bland, Associate in Arts, Armstrong College of Savannah 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

**Stephen P. Bond, B.S. in Architecture. The Georgia Institute of 
Technology. 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Minnie McG. Campbell, Diploma from the Banks Secretarial School. 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

** James H. Carithers, B.S. in Industrial Arts, Berry College. 
■ Instructor in Engineering Draiving 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANN Ml 



James Charbonnier, \.l>.. B.S., Geneva College, Geneva University, 

Switzerland; B.D.. Drew I niversit\ : A.M.. Vale University; Doctor 
of Letters. Geneva University. 

Instructor in French, German and History 

Patsv Crockett, B.S., University of Tennessee. 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

LAMAR W. Davis, B.S. and M.S.. University of South Carolina: Certi- 
fied Public Accountant. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Josephine Simmons Denmark, B.S., Georgia Teachers College: M.S. 
in Home Economics. University of Georgia. 

Instructor in Home Economics 

John J. Di w. B.A.. Harvard University. 

Instructor in English 

Rossiter C. Durfee, A.B., and M.A., Stanford University. 

Instructor in English and Director of the Masquers 

Roberta W. Earle, Savannah Vocational School. 

Clerical Assistant in the Business Office 

Elizabeth Ogletree Hitt, attended Armstrong College of Savannah 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

Rosa P. Hopson, A.B., Middlebury College; M.A., University of Geor- 
gia: Certificate from the Sorbonne University, Paris. France. 
Instructor in French and English 

Essie D. Jenkins. Owensboro Business College. Kentucky. 

Instructor in Typing 

Joseph I. Killorin. A.B.. St. Johns College: M.A.. Columbia Univer- 
sity. 

Instructor in History and Political Science 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.M.. Converse College: A.B.. University of 
Georgia: M.A.. Columbia University. 

Instructor in French and English 

Muriel B. McCall, A.B.. Florida State College for Women: M.A.. 
University of Georgia. 

Librarian 

Elmo M. McCray. Jr.. B.S. and M.S., University of Alabama. 
Instructor in Biology 

Helen Meighev Taylor's Business College. 

Secretary to the Vice-President 



VDMINISTR \TI<>\ 



John Morris, B.S, in Engineering, Princeton I niversit) ; M.S. in 
Chemical Engineering, The Georgia Institute <>f Technology. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Marjorie \. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
College of >a\ annah. 

Administrative issisiani and Secretary to the President 

Georgi Nichols, Attended Richards Business School. 
Clerical Assistant in the Business Office 

JACK H. PADGETT, V.B., Wofford College: M.A.. University of North 
Carolina. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

James Harry Persse, B.F.A., I niversity of Georgia: Master of Music. 

Florida State I niversity. 
Director of the Glee Club and Faculty Advisor for Student Publications 

Elizabeth Pound. Georgia State College for Women. State Teachers 
College. 

Director of the Student Center 

Mary Anne Rollison, Associate in Arts. Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah. 

Assistant to the Librarian 

Jean Russell, A.B. Shorter College: M.A.. Peabody College. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Roy J. Sims, B.S., Daxid Lipscomb College: M.S., University of Ten- 
nessee. 
Instructor in Physical Education for Men and Basketball Coach 

Robert I. Strozier, A.B. and Graduate Study. University of Georgia: 
Graduate Study. Florida State University 
Instructor in English 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B.. Monmouth College; M.A., Northwest- 
ern University: Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work. Western 
Reserve University. 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Louis Thompson, M.B.A.. LL.B.. University of Georgia: Certified 
Public Accountant. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

William S. Winn, B.D. and A.B., Emory University: M.A., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School in Chicago. 
Instructor in Commerce 



8 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Armstrong Evening College Instructors 

\I\kiw \m)i:ks<>\. B.A.. Texas State College for Women: M.A., Co- 
lumbia I niversit) . 

Instructor in English 

Wesley W. Apple, B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Robert B. Blackmon, B.S., Clemson College. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Martha Browne. B.A., Winthrop College: Certificate in English. Uni- 
versity of South Carolina. 

Instructor in English 

Bryant W. Canty, A.B., University of Georgia. 

Instructor in Botany 

James Charbonnier, A.B., B.S., Geneva College, Geneva University, 
Switzerland; B.D., Drew University: A.M.. Yale University: Doctor 
of Letters. Geneva University. 

Instructor in French, German and History 

Phillip E. Dalton, B.A., University of Miami. 
Instructor in Psychology 

Orlando A. Diaz, B.S., Phillips University; M.A., Phillips University. 
Instructor in Spanish 

James M. Ennis, Jr., B.M.E., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Michael J. Gannam, B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., University of 
North Carolina; L.L.B., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Political Science 

Clare B. Gray, B.A.. Florida State University. 
Instructor in English 

Robert G. Hattwick, B.A., Ohio State University; M.B.A., Ohio 
State University: Ph.D.. Florida State University. 
Instructor in Psychology 

Richard 0. Hayes, A.B., University of California: M.S., University of 
Utah: Ph.D.. Cornell University. 

Instructor in Biology 

Julia F. Hering. B.S.. Florida State University: M.A., Florida State 
University. 

Instructor in History 



ADMINISTRATION 



Rosa B. Hopson, LB., Middleburj College; M.A.. I niversit) of Geor- 
gia; Certificate from Sorbonne I Diversity. 

Instructor in French mid English 

Wendell M. Houston, B.C.E., Clemson College. 
Instructor in mathematics 

Virginia L Hudson, B.S., Georgia State College for Women; M.A.. 
Duke University . 

Instructor in History 

TiD Hi nter. A.B.. I diversity of Florida. 

Instructor in Psychology 

WARREN Ray Jones, B.C.E., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
Instructor in Engineering Draiving 

Mary Howard Lebey, A.B.. Winthrop College: M.S.S.W., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 

Instructor in Sociology 

Edna Luke, B.S.. University of Georgia; M.A., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Music 

Albert R. Marks, Jr., B.S.. University of North Carolina: Certified 
Public Accountant. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

John Fleetwood Moore, Savannah Traffic Bureau. 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic Management 

Joseph C. Muller, B.B.A., University of Georgia. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Margaret A. Murphy, A.B.. University of Georgia: Advanced Study. 
Columbia I Diversity. 

Instructor in Ceramics 

Don Martin, A.B., Manchester College: M. Sc. in Chemistry. Ohio 
State University. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Laura M. Parker, B.S., Georgia Teachers College: M.A.. University 

of Georgia. 

Instructor in English 

Barbara B. Prow, B.S., Georgia State College for Women. 
Instructor in Home Economics 

William Rokoff, B.S., New York University: Graduate work. The 
College of New York City. 

Instructor in Business Administration 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Jean Russell, A.B.. Shorter College: M.A.. Peabody College. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Lee B. Sayre, B.A.. The I ni\ <*r-it\ of the South (Sewanee) 
Instructor in English 

Bart ' • Shea, III. B.S.. Universit) of Alabama: LL.B.. Emorj I Di- 
versity. 

Instructor in Economics 

Harold R. Sheehan, B.A., Tufts College; M.A.. Tufts College. 
Instructor in Sociology 

Earnest Siegel, B.A., Northeastern University: M.S.. Bostor Univer- 
sity. 

Instructor in Sociology 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Mary E. Sutton, B.A.. University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Economics 

Henry M. Terry, B.M. and B.M.E.. Jacksonville College of Music: 
M.E.D., University of Florida. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Louis A. Thompson, M.B.A.. LL.B.. University of Georgia; Certified 
Public Accountant. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Willie Grier Todd, A.B., University of Georgia: M.A., University of 
North Carolina. 

Instructor in History 

Carlos Tucker, Jr., A. B. Mercer University. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Ardelle Waldhour, A.B.. University of Georgia: Graduate Work. 
I Diversity of Georgia. 

Instructor in English 

Joseph L. Zerman, B.A., Emor) University. 

Instructor in English 

Joseph Zelntgher, A.B.. D.D.S., Neil York University. 
Instructor in Physical Science 



ADMINISTRATION II 



Technical Institute Program Instructors : 

(.hem ical Technology 
Ellis 0. Barnes, l>. Ch. I... I niversit) <>f Louisville. 

John Q Bowers, B.S. in Ch. E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 

in Ch. I'.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

EVERETT J. HaRRIMAN, B.S. in Chemical Engineering. University of 
Maine; M.S. in Pulp and Paper Technology. University of Maine. 

Jwiks C. McKee, Bachelor of Forestry, Stephen F. Austin College: 
Mastery of Forestry, Duke I niversity. 

Robert D. Mounts, B.S. in Chemistry, I niversity of Hawaii: B. Ch. E., 
North Carolina State University. 

Ernest Clifton, B.S. in Mech. E., Georgia Institute of Technology. 

FRANK N. Rhoad, B.S. in Chemistry. Wofford College; M.S. in Chem- 
istry. Vanderhilt University. 

Calvin F. Schlessman, B.S. in Chem. Engineering. Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology. 

DAVID W. Reid, B.S. in Ch. E., North Carolina State University. 

Industrial Technology 

Sidney T. Nutting, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Georgia Institute 
of Technology. 

Robert J. Cummings, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering, University 
of Florida; Master of Science in Engineering, University of Florida. 

James A. Henderson, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering. University 
of Florida. 

George L. Brannen, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Georgia Institute 
of Technology. 

Creed H. Reagan, B.S. of Industrial Engineering. University of Ten- 
nessee. 

Herman R. Letchworth, Journeyman Machinist, methods and ma- 
chine design. 



* Instructors for courses offered at the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration plant. 





J 





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t' 



Tin J M i 



[* 


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H"H 



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General Information 

History ami Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on May 27. L935, 1>\ 
the Mayor and Udermen of the Cit) of Savannah to meet a long-felt 

need for a junior college. The firsl college building was the magnificent 
home of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city from his widow 
and his daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Build- 
ing. i> an imposing structure of Italian Hennaissance architecture: 
inside, its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity: 
while outside it is one of the beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation. 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Program, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, 
which contains the auditorium and theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and class rooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as ex- 
officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady increase. 
At present the total number of students in the day and evening pro- 
grams is approximately one thousand. 

Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community by giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The student may complete one or more of the following specific 
objectives. 

1 . Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree; 

2. finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law, home economics, the 
ministr) and other professions; 

3. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry: 

4. Complete two years of an engineering program which 
is transferable for credit to colleges of engineering. 

The college awards an associate degree to students completing 
an approved program. 

Admission to the College 

A student planning to enter Armstrong will obtain from the Regis- 
trar an "Application for Admission Form." The student will complete 
and return this form to the Registrar's office. Request the High School 
Principal, or the College Registrar fin the case of an transfer student), 
to send a transcript of credits to the Registrar's Office, Armstrong Col- 
lege of Savannah. Savannah, Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar's office will gend 
a notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together 
with certain physical examination forms which must be completed and 
returned before the student can complete registration. The applicant 
will be notified of the dates of the freshman placement examinations. 
These tests do not affect a student's entering Armstrong, but will enable 
the faculty advisers to assist him in selecting a program of study upon 
entrance. Students are required to take these tests before registration 
is corn pie ted. 

Requirements For Admission 

There are two methods of admission to Armstrong College: either 
by certificate or by examination. 

By Certificate 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong College of Savannah 
bv certificate must be a graduate of an accredited high school with at 
least fifteen units of credit. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

2. No Bubject-matter units are prescribed. The high Bchool pro- 
gram should be of Buch nature as i" give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to con- 
tribute l<> this end are English composition, literature, natural science, 
histor) and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. 
The right is reserved to reject an\ applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

). A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the Office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Two units in high school algebra and one in plane geometry 
are pre-requisites for admission to the freshman class in engineering. 

By Examination 

Students beyond high school age. who do not meet the above 
requirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Edu- 
cational Development tests (high school level). The student will be 
admitted to college on the basis of his scores. These tests should be 
completed at least one week before registration. Additional informa- 
tion may be secured from the Registrar's office. 



By Transfer 

Credit will he allowed for work done in other institutions of 
proper rank and standing and in certain cases for training received in 
the Armed Services. Credit from other institutions will be accepted to- 
ward graduation to the extent that the student has a general average 
of "C" for all college work transferred. To receive a degree from 
Armstrong College of Savannah, a student must be in attendance taking 
a normal study load for two quarters earning a "C" average and, in 
addition, must satisfy the requirements of a particular course of 
study. Adults I students over 21 years of age) may receive credit 
for certain college work on the basis of the General Educational De- 
velopment tests (college level I . 

Admission of Special Students 

Adults who are interested in enrolling in courses for their in- 
trinsic value but who do not wish college credits may be enrolled as 
special students. Requirements pertaining to entrance examinations, 
physical examinations, and physical education do not apply to these 
students. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Transient Students 

A student regular!) enrolled in another eollege may register 
at Armstrong as a transient student with the permission of his dean 
or adviser. This permission should be obtained in writing prior to 
registration. For such a student, entrance requirements are waived. 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Development 
tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do college work. 
A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA Form No. 7-1993) is 
required of every veteran who attends this institution under Public 
Law 550 (Korean Bill I . application for which may be completed at 
the Veterans Administration office in the Industrial Building, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificate from the Vet- 
erans Administration, the student should contact the Armstrong Col- 
lege Veterans Office regarding processing of certificate and future 
monthly reports. All veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 
550 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 

r 

Orientation and Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the student's 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when 
the difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the adviser is usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because of greater inten- 
sity or critical developments are referable to community agencies out- 
side the college if this is agreeable to the student and his parents or 
guardians. 

The academic advisement of students is distributed among the 
entire faculty so that each instructor carries the responsibility for a 
proportionate number of the entire student body registered in the day 
program. Advisement interviews are scheduled with each student at 
least once a quarter and appointments for these interviews are mailed 
from the office of the Registrar. These interviews are designed to aid 
the student in planning his program of work in college. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each vear in June. At this time 



GENERAL IN FORM \TM>N 17 

an associate degree ia awarded to those students who have met the 
requirements for graduation, and recognition is given t<» those who 

qualify for scholastic honors. The faculty and graduates participate 

in full academic dress. 

Fees 

Tuition will be charged as follows for Armstrong College Courses: 
For 11-17 quarter hours — $55.00. 

For each quarter hour less than 11 quarter hours — $5.00. 
For each quarter hour in excess of 17 quarter hours — $5.00. 
All applied Music courses will be $45.00 per course. 

The tuition for University of Georgia Extension courses is $5.60 
per quarter hour. A registration fee of $1.00 per student per quarter 
will be charged for University of Georgia Extension courses. (Arm- 
strong College charges a service fee of sixty cents per quarter hour 
for handling Extension courses. The $5.60 charge per quarter hour 
for Extension courses represents $5.00 per quarter hour for tuition 
and .60^ per quarter hour service fee) . 

Anyone wishing to audit a non-laboratory course (but not receive 
college credit) may do so with permission of the instructor by paying 
a fee of $10.00 per course. 

Students will be allowed three days in which to complete regis- 
tration in each of the two Summer Terms. However, a late registration 
fee of $3.00 will be charged on the third day of registration. Five 
days will be allowed for completion of registration in the Fall, Win- 
ter and Spring Quarters, a late registration fee of $3.00 being charged 
on the fourth day of registration and $4.00 on the fifth day of regis- 
tration. 

An activity fee of $5.00 each quarter will be charged all day 
students who are registered for 10 quarter hours or more. This fee 
is not charged Evening College students unless they wish to partici- 
pate in the regular activity program of the college. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee 
for materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description 
of courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bul- 
letin. 

For cause a student may arrange with an instructor to make up 
an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to make 
up the announced test must be made within one week after the student 
returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination, and labora- 



u; 



\KM>TKO\<; collect: <>i s\\ \\\ Ml 



tor\ examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any- 
one student for a final make-up examination and, or final laboratory 
examination in a given subject shall not exceed $5.00. All fees will 
be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follow-: 

The student was absent (1 ) on official school business. 

(2) due to illness. 

(3) because of a death in the family. 

(4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented to the instructor in writing. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made only upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to 
students dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below: 



WITHDRAWAL SCHEDULE 



Withdrawal Dates 
First Session June 12. 13. 14. 

Summer Quarter June 17, 18 



1957 

Second Session 

Summer Quarter 
1957 

Fall Quarter. 1957 



Amount due to college 

2Q c ,'c of gross registration fees 
40 r r of gross registration fees 
60^r of gross registration fees 
80^ of gross registration fees 
20 r r of gross registration fees 
40^ of gross registration fees 
60 r r of gross registration fees 



June 19, 20, 21. 

June 24, 25 

July 29, 30, 31 

August 1, 2, 

August 5, 6, 7 

August 8, 9 80^ of gross registration fees 

September 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 20^ of gross registration fees 

September 30. Oct. 1, 2. 3. 4 40 r r of gross registration fees 



October 7, 8, 9. 10, 11 
October 14, 15. 16, 17. 18 

Winter Quarter, 1958 January- 2, 3, 6, 7, 8 

January 9, 10. 13, 14. 15 
January 16. 17. 20. 21. 22 
January 23. 24, 27. 28. 29 

Spring Quarter, 1958 March 19, 20, 21, 24. 25 



60 r <- of gross registration fees 
80^ of gross registration fees 
20 r r of gross registration fees 
of gross registration fees 
60 r r of gross registration fees 
80 r r of gross registration fees 
2G r r of gross registration fees 
March 26. 27. 28. 31. Apr. 1 49 r 'c of gro-s registration fees 
April 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 609c of gross registration fees 

April 9. 10. 11. 14. 15 80^ of gross registration fees 

A graduation fee of ST. 50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

Any student delinquent in the pa) ment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Each student leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is SI. 00 
each. 



GENERAL INFORMATION L9 

Library 

The college library of Armstrong College ia boused in Hodgson 

Hall on the corner of Whitakcr and \\ I'M Gaston Streets. Ml the 
materials are readilx available to the students since all hook- are on 
Open shelves. On the main floor i- the reference room which contain- 
reference hooks, non-fietion hook-, reserve desk and circulation desk. 
Downstairs is another reading room, containing fiction, biography, 
books in foreign languages, current and hound volumes of periodicals. 
The workroom and office of the Lihrarian are also downstairs. 

At the present time the library has more than 14,000 volumes and 
a collection of phamphlets on subjects of current interest. More than 
one hundred periodicals are received, including four newspapers. 
l>esides the books, periodicals and pamphlets, the library has a col- 
lection of recordings and a phonograph located in the downstairs 
reading room for the use of the students, faculty and staff. 

In addition to the resources of the college library the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, 
also housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains an outstanding 
collection of materials on Georgia and its history as well as a large 
collection of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the His- 
torical Society consist of more than ten thousand books, eighty peri- 
odical subscriptions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of 
the more complete files of Savannah newspapers, dating back to 1763. 

Audio Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, 
foreign languages and music, visual aids are supplemented by record- 
ings. 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each vear. 
These students w ork in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is inter- 
ested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application blanks may be secured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong Building. Those who wish to apply for scholarships for the 
school year beginning in September should file an application in the 
President's office not later than July 15. All applicants are required 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

to appear before an oral inten u w hoard during the month of August. 
Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this interview. 

Commission — 7 for SI 00.00 each. I Both men and women eligi- 
ble). 

These are work scholarships. Students who hold these spend a few 
hours each week as assistants in the library, laboratories or in the 
administrative offices. In some instances it is possible for a student 
to earn more than SI 00.00 a year. 

Arthur Lucas Memorial — 5 for S100.00 each. ( Both men and 
women eligible). 

Junior Chamber of Commerce — 2 for S100.00 each ( Both men 
and women eligible). One is for a sophomore and one is for a freshman. 

Edward McQuire Gordon Memorial — 1 for S200.00 (Men only 
are eligible). 

Savannah Gas Company Engineering — 1 for $100.00. (Men onl\ 
are eligible). 

Savannah Gas Company Home Economics — 2 for S100.00 each 
(Women only are eligible). 

Thomas Mayhew Cunningham Memorial — 1 for S200.00 ( Both 
men and women are eligible). 

Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place 
him name on file with the Business Office. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the book store. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 

The governing body for student affairs at Armstrong College is 
the Student Senate. This organization is made up of elected repre- 
sentatives from all student groups recognized by the Senate. It is 
the function and responsibility of the Senate to coordinate, direct 
and control student organizations and activities at Armstrong. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 

Athletics 

Basketball is the onl) sport in which the college fields an inter- 
collegiate team. Ml other sports at the college arc OH ail intramural 
basis. Intramural competition is offered in such -ports as basketball. 
volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, Softball and ping-pong. All are 
encouraged to take pari in this program. 

Physical Education Program 

All regular day students, except veterans, are required to partici- 
pate in a physical education program. Courses are offered each 
quarter except during the summer. These are listed elsewhere in the 
catalog under "Course Description-. 

Publications 

There are two student publications at Armstrong, the Inkwell, 
a newspaper, and the i Geechec. the college annual. These afford the 
students an opportunity to express themselves through creative writing 
and art work, and to gain experience in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950, after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was re- 
organized as the Little Theatre, Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in any 
phase of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up, costuming, 
and other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio and Tele- 
vision Workshop, formed to offer interested students an opportunity 
to develop techniques of radio and television broadcasting. 

The Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who enjoy 
singing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from group singing. 
Besides two yearly concerts at the college, the Glee Club has produced 
musicals with the Armstrong Masquers and sung for many civic 
groups in Savannah. 



22^ ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE 

Full) accredited college classes are offered after 6:00 p.m.. Mon- 
<la\ through Friday. Classes meet one. two or three evenings a week 
according to the amount of credit the course offers. 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non- 
credit basis. 

It is possible to enroll for classes taught on Monday. Wednesday 
and Friday at 6:00. 7:30 or 9:00 p.m. Students employed during the 
day are urged to limit their enrollment to one or two courses. Eighteen 
five-hour courses, or the equivalent, are required for graduation. 
A student planning to graduate, should complete a program of study 
listed elsewhere in this Bulletin under "Curriculums." 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed elsewhere 
in this Bulletin are applicable. When a student is enrolled in more 
than one course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. 
Refunds are made only in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc., is covered under "Fees". Student activity 
fees are not assessed evening college students, unless they wish to 
participate in the regular activity program of the college. 

Armstrong Evening College, as successor of the Savannah Branch 
of the University of Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation in 
June 1951. Veterans are now attending under Public Laws 550 and 
894 (Korean Veterans). 

Qualified Armed Service personnel, currently on active duty, may 
have their tuition partially defrayed by the services. This is arranged 
through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of Evening College courses, instructors, 
etc., may be obtained by addressing requests to the Director, Arm- 
strong Evening College. P. 0. Box 1913. Savannah. Georgia. 

The Technical Institute Programs 

Two programs leading to the degree of Associate in Science are 
offered jointly by the Armstrong Evening College and the Union 
Bag-Camp Paper Corporation. One of these offers a concentration of 
courses in Chemical Technology and the other relates to Industrial 
Technology. Both are two-year programs and all courses included 
in them are fully accredited by Armstrong College. 

The basic courses will be conducted at Armstrong College by the 
college staff. Tuition and entrance requirements for these classes are 
identical with those for similar courses in the Armstrong Evening 
College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

The advanced technical courses will be conducted at the plant 
of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation by fully qualified com- 
pan) personnel. Excellenl shop and laboratory facilities and class- 
rooms arc available. Tuition f<»r these courses is an administrative 
fee of $1. 00 per credit hour, payable to Armstrong College. Classes 
are open t»> students employed in an) industry. Those seeking col- 
lege credit must meet the entrance requirements listed elsewhere in 
the Bulletin. Students not seeking degrees may enroll on a non- 
credit basis. 

Classes at both Armstrong College and the Union Bag-Camp 
Paper Corporation are scheduled with duplicate or extra sessions 
whenever possible to accommodate shift workers with rotating work 
hours. 

Programs of study and course descriptions in the Technical 
Institute Programs will be found elsewhere in this bulletin under 
''Cu^^iculums ,, and "Course Descriptions." 

Senior College Courses 

Through the Extension Division of the University of Georgia, 
Armstrong Evening College offers upper-division courses which can 
be taken for credit, satisfying junior and senior requirements for 
the bachelor's degree. A minimum of one year of residence at the 
University is required to receive the bachelor's degree. The equiva- 
lent of one year of senior college work, however, may be completed 
through extension classes in residence at Armstrong College for 
certain degree programs. 

Instructors in the extension classes are approved by the heads 
of the departments at the University of Georgia. These courses then 
carry University credit and are recorded in the Registrar's office at 
the University of Georgia. They are University of Georgia courses 
taught in Armstrong Evening College. (See photostat). The section 
under "Fees" explains special charges for University of Georgia Ex- 
tension courses. 

In the past, the courses offered have been the core curriculum 
for the junior year leading toward the Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration degree; also, income tax accounting, a second course in business 
law, personnel administration and other advanced courses in economics 
and business administration as requested. 

Junior and senior courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree 
are offered in English, literature, history, psychology and sociology. 
Other courses will be added if sufficient student requests warrant. 

Courses required to qualify for State Department Teacher's Cer- 



24 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



tificates are sometimes offered as extension classes. Students are 
limited to 90 quarter hours of residence credit at the junior college 
level. Another 45 quarter hours of credit may be obtained through 
senior college extension classes. 

Transcripts of credit granted for University of Georgia Extension 
courses must be obtained from the office of the Registrar. University 
of Georgia. Athens. Georgia — not from Armstrong College. In re- 
questing such transcripts, the student should indicate that the courses 
were taken at Armstrong College of Savannah through the Extension 
Division <»f the I Diversity of Georgia. 

The University of Georgia 

Office of the Registrar 

Athens, Georgia 

April 28, 195U 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

This is to advise that any student may use up to 
a maximum of b5 quarter hours credit completed through 
correspondence and extension courses toward a degree 
at the University of Georgia. This may be taken over 
and above the first two years of work whether these 
be completed at a junior college or a senior college. 

Specifically, we will recognize without question 
up to U5 quarter hours credit completed in extension 
courses offered in a joint program sponsored by 
Armstrong College of Savannah and the Division of 
General Extension at the University of Georgia, 

Cordially, 



WND:cc 



Walter N. Danner 
Registrar 



General Regulations 

A.dvisemen1 and Placement IV^i* 

To help a student select a definite objective earl) in hi> college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers t<> each entering freshman 
a Beries of interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. In the fall, these 
are given during Freshman Week and are scored prior to the student's 
interview with an adviser. On the basis of these objective measure- 
ments, the student- previous record, his interest and his famih 
counsel, the student with the aid of his adviser decides <>n a program 
of stud\ which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examinations 

Each day student must submit a completed physical examination 
report on the forms furnished by the college before he can complete 
his registration. A chest X-ray is also required. On the basis of the 
examination, the physical education director will adapt a program of 
training and recreation to individual requirement-. This regulation is 
not applicable to students enrolled in the Evening College. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours 
per quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes 
that the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours 
per week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 
quarter hours will be granted only to students who have a **B" average 
for the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a stu- 
dent may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements 
for graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 
21 hours in any one quarter. 

No student will be allowed to take more than 11 quarter hours 
of work in the Evening College during the fall, winter or spring 
quarters unless he has better than a " 4 B" average in the last quarter 
for which grades are available. A student will be limited to 6 quarter 
hours during any one term of the summer unless he has better than 
a "B" average in the last quarter of work for which grades are avail- 
able. All entering students are limited to 11 quarter hours of work 
in the fall, winter and spring quarters: and to 6 quarter hours of 
work during any one term of the summer session. Exception may be 
made in the case of entering students who are employed. 



26 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Admission to Class 

Students will he admitted to class when the instructor i> furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the facult\ and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the use 
on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the administration and faculty that students in college 
should be held accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, report 
cards, warnings of deficient scholarship and all such notices are 
not sent out to parents or guardians by the Registrar except on request. 
Instead the students themselves receive these reports and are expected 
to contact their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report 
cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades 
are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access 
to an adviser; in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are 
available to help any student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 
Incomplete must he removed before 

mid term of the following quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
Failing Course must he repeated 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade) should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements 
of the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed In the mid- 
dle of the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". An "E" 
grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

A student who receives an "E" grade in the Evening College 
will have one year in which to complete the requirements of the 
course. If the "E" grade is not removed within this time, it auto- 
matically becomes an "F". An "E" grade becomes an "F" if the course 
is repeated. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive 
(matters taking a normal load and achieving an average grade of "B r ' 



A plus 

A 

B 

C 

D 

E 


Exceptional 

Excellent 

Good 

Fair 

Poor 

Incomplete 


F 
W 

W/F 


Failure 
Withdrew 
Withdrew F 



GENKKVL REG! LATIONS 27 

or better with no grade below thai of "C" will be placed on the Pel 
manent Dean's List This list is published each June in the com- 
tnencemenl program. 

Graduates \\ li<» meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List and wh<> are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated a> graduating summa cum laude 
(with highest distinction i . The designation cum laude (with distinc- 
tion! will he bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements 
with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

\ valedictorian will he selected by the graduating class from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a grade of "B" or 
better in each course during any quarter will he placed on the Dean's 
Scholastic Attainment List. 

Students in the Evening College enrolled for ten or more hours, 
who earn L5 consecutive quarter hours of credit with grades of "B" 
or better in each course will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attain- 
ment List. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A day student who has been absent from class for a valid reason 
should have the absence excused with a written statement to his in- 
structor who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the 
Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from 
the date the student returnrs to school; otherwise the absence will 
not be excused. Evening College students must leave excuses for 
absence in the Evening College office on a special form provided for 
that purpose. 

An Evening College student whose absences for any cause exceed 
one third of the number of times the class meets in the quarter will 
be dropped from the class. The student will be given a "W" if at the 
time he was dropped he had a passing grade; if at the time he was 
dropped he was failing, he will be given a "WF." 

The above regulation is waived only in those cases in which the 
instructor and the registrar concur. 

A student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
times the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused ab- 
sence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the 



28 A RMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Registrar's office when a -Indent should be dropped. The Registrar's 
office will notify the student. Grades assigned to those who have 
been dropped will be either W or W/F. A student who is dropped 
within three weeks after the beginning of the quarter will auto- 
matically receive a grade of W. A student who is dropped after the 
3rd week of the quarter will receive either a W or a W F depending 
upon his status at time the student withdraws or is dropped from 
class. 

Students will be charged with absences incurred by late regis- 
tration in the college as indicated in the current bulletin and these 
absences carry the same penalty as the other absences from a course. 

Attendance at monthly assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, i- 
a pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such intentions known to the administration of the college in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

A student should formally withdraw from any class which he 
discontinues by securing the written approval of the instructor and his 
faculty adviser. This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's 
office. Grades assigned to those who withdraw will be either W or W/F. 
A student who withdraws within three weeks after the beginning of 
the quarter will automatically receive a grade of W. A student who 
withdraws after the 3rd week of the quarter will receive either a W 
of W F depending upon his status at the time the student withdraws 
or is dropped from class. 

Dismissal 

Any day student failing (except in cases excused before examina- 
tions on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than 
phvsical education in any one quarter will be dropped from the 
rolls of the college. Any student who fails to make an average of at 
least 0.6 honor points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during 
the first three quarters work at the college will not be allowed to re- 
register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students who have less 
than a "C" average at the end of the fourth quarter. At the end 
of the sixth quarter's work a student must have a 0.8 honor point per 
quarter hour average in order to re-register. 

\n\ studt nt in the evening program seeking credit who fails 
(except win n excused before final examination on account of illness) 
to pass at least one course in two consecutive quarters will be dropped 



Gl NER \l. REG1 LATIONS 29 



from the rolls of the college. \n\ student in the evening program who 

fails to make an average <>f at leasl 0.6 honor points per quarter hour 

in the firs! 50 quarter hours of work at the college will not lie allowed 

t«» re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students who have 
less than a "C" average at the end of 70 quarter hours of work. At 
the end of ( )l> quarter hours of work, a student must have an average 
of 0.8 honor point- per quarter hour in order to re-register. 

Students who have been asked to withdraw on account of academic 
deficienc) will he re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes to 
another college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If a 
student does not go to another college he may re-register at Armstrong 
after two quarters. He re-enters on probation for one quarter, during 
which quarter he must make a "C" average. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed else- 
where in the catalog under "Curriculums" with an average 
grade of "C." Any exceptions to a program may be re- 
ferred by a student's adviser to the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standing. 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation will be 
completed at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. Not more than one-fourth of the total work required for 
graduation will consist of correspondence courses and 
credit for training in the Armed Services. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrars 
office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and 
other agencies having access to confidential records. A good college 
record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curriculums 



General 

Before registration, the student should PLAN A PROGRAM OF 
STUDY WITH AN ADVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 
are required for graduation, he should have on record in the office of 
his adviser a copy of his program. In order for a student to make any 
changes in his planned program he must consult his adviser. The 
adviser and the Registrar will check a student's program and it will 
be approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation 

An associate degree is conferred upon all students who suc- 
cessfully complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the 
two-year programs outlined in the catalog. 

If a student plans to transfer to another institution either before 
or after graduation, it is essential that he determine what courses 
must be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree 
requirement of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding 
of one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings, right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 14, 15 (114,115); History 14, 15 (114, 
115) ; ten quarter hours of natural sciences, and Physical Education 
11, 12, 13. With permission of instructor, students may substitute 
Physical Education 14 for Physical Education 12 and Physical Edu- 
cation 23 for Physical Education 13. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of phy- 
sical education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses des- 
cribed below may substitute English 28 for one of the required English 
courses. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 



CTJR1IIU LI MS 



31 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



Business Administration* 
First Year 



English 1 \. L5 Freshman English 

Hi-ton 14, 1.") Western 

( 'i\ ilization 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 . . 

Laboratory Science 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 



Mathematics 
Electives 



-Finance . 5 

5 



TOTAL 



Second Year 

10 English 21, 22— Sophomore 

English 10 

10 Physical Education 3 

3 Business Administration 24, 25 — 

10 Accounting 10 

5 Economics 21, 24 — Principles and 

Problems 10 

Political Science 13 — Gov't, of U.S. 5 

Electives .. , 10 

~4S TOTAL ~48 



Engineering 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The student should obtain a catalog from the senior 
college he plans to attend and check this program against the re- 
quirements. The courses required for the freshman year have been 
worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 



FIRST YEAR 
Chemistry 11, 12— General 10 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative 

Analysis 5 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 
Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 6 

Engineering 19 — Descriptive 

Geometry 3 

Mathematics 16, 17, 20— College 
Ugebra, Trigonometry and 

Analvtic Geometrv and Calculus 15 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

TOTAL "52 



SECOND YEAR 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Physics 21, 22 23 18 

Mathematics 21, 22. 23— Calculus . 15 

History 14, 15 10 



TOTAL 56 



Forestry 

A one-year program for students in Forestry. The student should 
obtain a catalog from the senior college he plans to attend and check 
this program against the requirements. 

English 14, 15 — Freshman 10 

Mathematics 16 17— College Algebra, Trigonometry 10 

Physics 11 or Physical Science 11 5 

Biology 11, 12— Botany 10 

Economics 21 — Principals 5 

* A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for 
required subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this 
course. 



:vi 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Physical Education 11. 12. 13 
Engineering 11 Drawing 

Political Ecience 13 — Gov* rnment <»l I . 

TOTAL 



Senior College Preparatory Programs 
Home Eeonomics 



FIRST YEAR 

English 14. 13 — Freshman English 10 
rlistorj 1 L, 13 — History of Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 
Horn Economics 10 — Orientation: 

Careers and Personal Development 3 

Home Economics 11— Clothing 5 

\rt 11— Creative 5 

Lahoratorv Science 10 



TOTAL 48 



SECOND YEAR 

English 21, 22— Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 5 

Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 

Home Economics 24 — Family 

Fundamentals 5 

Social Studies 10 

Electives 5 

* Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

TOTAL ~4S 



Industrial Management 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. 



FIRST YEAR 
Chemistry 11. 12— General 10 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative 

Analysis 5 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 10 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 6 

Engineering 19 — Descriptive 

Geometry 3 

Mathematics 16. 17. 20— College 

Ugebra, Trigonometry, and 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 15 
Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 



lo I \l 



32 



SECOND YEAR 
Economics 21. 24 — Principles 

and Problems 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 
Business Administration 24. 25 — 

Principles of Accounting 

Physics 11. 12— General Physics 
Mathematics 19 — Mathematics of 

Finance 

Physical Education 
History 14. 15 Western 

Civilization 

TOTAL 



10 
10 

10 

12 

5 

3 

10 
60 



Liberal Arts 

This program is recommended for candidate- for an A.B. degree, 
pre-education. prelaw, pie-ministerial, journalism, and other pre- 
professional concentrations. 

* Nutc admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
stated on page 64. 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



33 



FIRST \ I \K 
English 1 1. 15 Freshman 

English 
History I l. 1 5 W estern 

( 'i\ ilization 
Physical Education 11. 12. 13 
Laboratory Science 
Mathematics 16 — College 

Ugebra 
Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 
•Foreign Language 



TOTAL 



in 



53 



SECOND YEAH 

English 21, 22 Sophomore 

English 1<) 

Physical Education 3 

Two of the follow in:: COUTSCS 10 

History 25 Recenl European 
Political Sri. ii-»- 13 Gov't, of I .S. 
Psychology 21a Introductory 
Sociology 20a — Introductory 
Economics 21— Principles 
Philosophy lo Introductory 
•Science 10 

Electives 10 

TOTAL ~43 



.Mathematics 

A course designed for those students who wish to major in mathe- 
matics. 

FIRST \EAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 

English 10 Physical Education 3 

Historv 14. 15— Western Physics 11, 12, or 

Civilization 10 Physics 21. 22. 23 12 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 Electives 23 

Mathematics 16 — College 

Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

Mathematics 20 — Analytic 

Geometry and Calculus 5 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

TOTAL "18 TOTAL ~4S 



Medical Technology 

This program is designed for those students who wish to obtain 
their first two years toward a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 
Technology. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below: 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14. 1.5— Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 10 

History 14, 15 — History of Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Biology 23 6 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 Chemistry 13 5 

Mathematics 16 5 Physics 11, 12 12 

Biology 14, 15 10 French or German 10 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 Mathematics 17 .5 

TOTAL ~48 TOTAL ~51 

:: A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of his adviser, sub- 
stitute other courses required by the senior institution during hi- first two year-. 



34 



vkmstro.v; COLLKCK <>l SAVANNAH 



Physical Education 

FIRST YEAR 
English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14, 15— Western Civili- 
zation 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

"Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

Biology 14, 15 10 

home Economics In — Nutrition ... 4 

**Electives 6 



TOTAL 48 



M.COND YEAR 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology- 18, 19 — Anatomy and 

Physiology 10 

***Physical Education 23— Senior 

Life Saving and Swimming .... 2 
Physical Education 14 — Officiating 

of Basketball 2 

Psychology 21a — Introductory . . 5 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 5 

Sociology 21 — Marriage & the 

Family 5 

**Electives 6 

TOTAL ~48 



Physics 

A course designed for those students who wish to major in Physics. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 

English 10 Physical Education 3 

History 14, 15— Western Physics 11. 12 or Physics 21, 22, 23 12 

Civilization 10 Electives 23 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 16 — College 

Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry .... 5 
Mathematics 20 — Analytic 

Geometry and Calculus 5 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

TOTAL ~48 TOTAL ~48 



Pre-Dental 

This program is designed for those students who wish to pre- 
pare themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three or 
more years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is 
awarded upon successful completion of the academic program des- 
cribed below: 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14. 15— Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 10 

History 14, 15 — History of Western Physical Education 3 

* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
-tat. (I on page 6 1. 

** It is recommended that English 28 and Physical Education 20 be taken as 
elective courses. 

*** The student is exempt from this course provided he has a Red Cross 
Senior Life Sa\ inii Certificate. 



SENIOR COLLKGK PREPAR ATORY PROGRAMS 

( Lvilization LO Biologj 23 6 

Physical Education 11. 12, L3 3 Chemistry 13 5 

Mathematics 16 5 Physics LI, 12 12 

Biology 11. 1") . 10 French oi German 10 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 Mathematics 17 5 

[•OTA! ~48 TOTAL ~51 



Pre-Medical 



This program is designed for those student- who wish to prepare 
themselves for the stud) of medicine after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts is awarded upon 
sucessful completion of the academic program described below. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 10 English 21, 22 10 

Historj 14, 15 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 Biology 23 6 

Mathematics 16 5 Chemistry 13 5 

Biology 14, 15 10 Physics 11, 12 12 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 French or German 10 

Mathematics 17 5 

TOTAL ~48 TOTAL ~51 

Pre-Nursing 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offering a B.S. in Nursing. 

English 14, 15 10 

History 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11 5 

Mathematics 16 5 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 5 

Any three of the following: 
English 28 
Political Science 13 
Psychology 21a 
Sociology 20a 15 

TOTAL "50 

Pre-Optometry 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optometry in the United States are relatively uniform but are not 
identical. The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards 
of Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare 
a student for transfer to any school or college of optometry in the 
United States and Canada. 



36 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANW Ml 



FIRST YEAR 

English 11. 15 

History 14. 15 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 
Math, matica 16. 17 

Biolog] 11. 15 

Chemistry 11. 12 





SECOND YEAR 






3 





English 21. 22 
Physical Education 
Biology 23 
Physics 11. 12 . 
Mathematics 20 
Sociology an<l Psychology 


10 
3 
6 

12 
5 

10 


i3 


TOTAL 


"46 



TOTAL 53 

Pre-Pharmacy 

This is a one-year concentration for those students who wish 
to obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmacy require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

English 14. 15 10 

History 14. 15 10 

Chemistry 11. 12 10 

Biology 18, 19 

or 

Biology 16, 17 10 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

Mathematics 16 5 

TOTAL IS 

Pre- Veterinary 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a senior institution. 
Some colleges and universities require a veterinary student to begin 
specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well-rounded 
foundation for the study of veterinary medicine, it is recommended 
that he pursue the two year pre-medical program. 

English 14. 15 10 

Histoiv 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 

Biology 14. 15 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 16, 17 10 

TOTAL ~53 

Teaching 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years b] 
colleges preparing teachers are general in nature: English, history, 
mathematics, a science, social studies and physical education to men- 
tion some of these. The program below enables prospective teachers 
to be certified by the State Department of Education as having com- 
pleted two years of college and entitles the student to the Associate 
in Arts degree. Some of the third year requirements can be com- 
pleted at Armstrong Evening College as extension classes of the 
I diversity of Georgia. 



TERMIN \L PROGR VMS 



>. 







MliH 


Education 


11 




English 


1 I. 


L5 




History 


11. 


15 




Natural 


Science 




Physica 


Ed. 11. 


12, 


Politica 


Science 


13 


Psychology 


21a 





\ i \i; 



13 



TOTAL 



SE( OND \ EAH 
\n 1 1 oi Music 20 
English 21, 22 
Mathematics 9 >>r 16 
Physica] Education 
Electives 



TOTAL 



ID 
") 

3 
25 



18 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 
Business Administration Accounting 

Three- Year Terminal 
FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15— Freshman English 10 ** English 21. 22 10 

History 14. 15 — Western Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 Economics 21, 24— Principles 

Natural Science 10 and Problems 10 

Business \dministration 24. 25, Aect. 10 Bu>ine-- Administration 27, 28 — 

Elective* 5 Business Law 10 

***Electives .15 

TOTAL ~48 TOTAL ~48 



THIRD YEAR 
Business Administration 34 — Intermediate Accounting 
Business Administration 36 37 — Income Tax Accounting 
Business Administration 29 — Cost Accounting or 

Business Administration 35 — Intermediate Accounting 

Economics 30 — Personnel Administration 

Mathematics 

Electives 

TOTAL 



5 
10 

5 

5 

5 

15 

45 



Business Administration 



General 



Two-Year Terminal 

Many students will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity 
to select those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient 
general education is included in the core curriculum to make this a 
well-rounded program. 

* Students in this curriculum should secure the catalog of the senior college 
which they plan to attend and plan a program with an adviser. 

Recommended electives for elementary teachers include health, geography, 
economics. Georgia Problems f Social Science 4), English 28 and additional 
science cou r ses. 

** English 28 may be substituted for English 22. 

*** Students planning to complete the three year program >hould substitute 
10 hours in accounting for electives. 



;;; 



ARM>TW<>\<; COLLEGE OF SAVAN.WH 



FIRST YEAR 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 
Fngliah 

History 14. 15— Western Civili- 
zation 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 

Natural Science 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles 
and Problems 

Electives 



SECOND YEAR 
♦English 21, 22— Sophomore English 10 



10 


Phj -i< -al Education 

Business Administration 24, 25 


3 


10 


Accounting 


10 


3 


Business Administration 27 — 




10 


Business Law 

Business Administration and 


5 


10 


Commerce Electives 


10 


5 


Typing 

Calculator and Comptometer 

Shorthand 

Business Administration — 34 

Intermediate Acct. 
Business Administration 28 — 

Business Law 






Electives (other) 


10 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 



W 



Business Administration General 

Three-Year Terminal 

A student who cannot transfer to a senior college at the end of 
his second year may get a broader foundation for work as a super- 
visor or junior executive by completing the program below. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114. 115 — Freshman English 121. 122— World Literature 

English 10 or English 128 — Public Speaking 

History 114. 115 — Western and Business Administration 115 — 

Civilization 10 Business Corespondence 10 

Natural Science 10 Business Administration 124. 125 — 

Economics 121. 124 10 Elementary Accounting 10 

Elective 5 Business Administration 127 

< E-370) — Business Law 5 

Business Administration and 

Commerce Electives 10 

Free Electives 10 

TOTAL ~45 TOTAL ~45 

THIRD lEAR 
Mudent will select with an adviser seven of the following subjects plus two 
free electives: 

Business Administration 128 ( E-371 ) — Business Law <2nd cour- 5 

Busint ss Administration 151 — Principles of Transpo tation 5 

Business Administration 160 (E-351) — Principles of Management 5 

Business Administration 161 — Principles of [nsura 5 

Business Administration 162 (E-390) — Real Estate Principles . 5 

Economic- 12."> (E-312) — Elementary Economic Statistics 5 

Economics 126 — American Economic History 5 

Economics 127 < E-326>— Money and Banking 5 

I <i ri' mics 128 <E-360> — Principles of Marketing 5 

* English 28 may he substituted for English 22. 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 39 

Economics 129 (E-386) Labor Economics 5 

Economics 13] (E-444) Governmenl and Business 5 

Economics 132 (E-431) — -Investments •> 

rOTAL ."60 

Business Administration Transportation 

Three-Year Terminal Program 
As a communications center, Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management. A com- 
mittee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck 
lines, in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the 
professional classes listed below. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114, 115— Freshman English 121, 122— World Literature 

English 10 or English 128 — Public Speaking 

History 114, 115 — Western and Business Administration 115 — 

Civilization 10 Business Correspondence 10 

Business Administration 151 — Natural Science 10 

Introduction to Transportation 5 Business Administration 154 — Ad- 
Business Administration 152 — vanced Rates & Tariffs 5 

Elementary Rates & Tariffs 5 Business Administration 155 — 

Business Administration 153 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

Intermediate Rates & Tariffs 5 Business Administration 156 — Inter- 
Economics 121, 124 — Principles state Commerce Commission and 
and Problems 10 Public Service Commission Pro- 
cedure 5 

Business Administration 124, 125 — 
Elementary Accounting 10 

TOTAL ~45 TOTAL ~45 

THIRD YEAR 

Students will select 5 of the subjects listed under the third year of Business 
Administration-General plus Business Administration 127, Business Law. Elec- 
tives to complete 135 hours total credits. 

Transportation 

Fifty-Hour Concentration in Transportation 
Students wishing a thorough background in transportation may- 
receive a certificate upon satisfactory completion of the program that 
follows: 

BA 151 — Introduction to Transpo r tation 5 

BA 152— Elementary Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA 153 — Intermediate Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA 154. — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA 155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

BA 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission and Public 

Service Commission Procedure 5 

Economics 121 and 124 — Principles and Problems 10 

English 114 and 115 — Freshman English or English 128 — Public 

Speaking and BA 115 — Business Correspondence 10 

TOTAL "50 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Business Administration 

One- Year Program 

\ one year program in Business Administration for those per- 
sons who ma\ m>t wish to complete the two year concentration, with 
emphasis on business courses. A certificate will be awarded to those 
who successfully complete the program. 

Business Administration 24. 25. 34 15 

Economics 21. 24 10 

Busin< ss Administration 27 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL ~48 

Commerce Secretarial 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students 
who wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 — Freshman Business Administration 24 — 

English 10 Accounting 5 

History 14. 15— Western * English 21, 22 10 

Civilization 10 Commerce 17 — Office Practice ... 5 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 Commerce 21 a-b-c — Typing 6 

Natural Science 10 Commerce 22 a-b-c — Shorthand 15 

Commerce 11 a-b-c — Typing 6 Physical Education 3 

Commerce 12 a-b-c — Shorthand . 15 

TOTAL 54 TOTAL 44 

Commerce Stenographic 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may 
herein acquire some of the skills which will enable him to earn a 
livelihood. 

Commerce 11 a, b, c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a, b, c — Shorthand 15 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Business Administration 24 — Accounting 5 

•♦English 14, 15- Freshman 10 

***Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

Commerce 13a. b, c, Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer 6 

TOTAL "50 



* English 28 may he substituted for English 22. 
** English 28 may he substituted for English 15. 

*** Physical Education i= required in all one year terminal programs if a 
d rtificate i- desired. 



TERMIIS \l. PROGR \\1> 11 



Home Economics 

I In- course is designed to tneel the Deeds <>f those nmnni who 
plan to complete their college work ai Armstrong. Sufficient electives 
are allowed to enable the student to select commerce Bubjects which 
have a vocational value or cultural subjects for worth) use of leisure 
time. 

FTRS1 5 EAB SECOND YEAR 
En glish 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 English 21, 22 — Sophomore English 10 
Hi-ton 1 1. 15 Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

Physical Education 3 and Decorating 5 

Natural Science 10 Home Economics 24 — Family 

1 Human Biology included) Fundamentals 5 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation: Home Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Personal Development 5 Planning and Serving 5 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing . . 5 Electives 20 

I'-whology 21 — Introductory 5 

TOTAL ~4& TOTAL ~48 

Human Relations* 

The Terminal Program sequence in Human Relations is designed 
to start with the student's immediate interests in learning, methods of 
study and aptitude measurement. The next course, on principles and 
facts about the individual's growth, needs, feelings and learning about 
the world around him, is followed by a practical application through 
experiments or by interning in selected community programs where 
individual development and adjustment may be directly observed. 
This leads to a study of a person's relationship to his social groups, 
a study of marriage and family adjustment, principles and facts about 
the way that our society is organized and finally to a practical study, 
through local organizations, of needs and resources for human adjust- 
ment in our community. A student who completes this sequence should 
have a basic understanding of himself and others that will improve 
his effectiveness in his family, his work I whether in the home or em- 
ployed elsewhere!, his social relationships and his responsible par- 
ticipation in community living. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 English 21, 22 — Sophomore Engli-h 10 

History 14. 15 — Western Civilization 10 Biology 14, 15 — General Zoology- 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 or 

** Mathematics 9 or 16 5 Biology 16, 17 — Human Biology 10 

Political Science 13 5 Physical Education 3 

* Students in other concentrations may elect any Psychology or Sociology 
course in this program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites arc 
necessary in Psychology 21b and Sociology 20b only. 

** Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 a- 
stated on page 64. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Psychology 20 — Applied Psychology 5 Sociology 21 — Marriage and 

Psychology 21a — Jntioductory Family 5 

Psychology 5 Psychologj 22 — Social Psychology 5 

Psychology 21 h — Experimental Sociology 20a — Introductory 

Psychology 5 Sociology 5 

Sociology 20b — Social Problems ... 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL ~M TOTAL ~48 

Liberal Arts 

A student in the Liberal Arts. Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 14, 15 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 **Electives 35 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

* Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

**Electives 10 

TOTAL ~4S TOTAL ~48 

THREE YEAR PROGRAM 

First Two Years of Liberal Arts. 

THIRD YEAR 

Classical Culture E-301 - 302 10 hours 

History E-351 - E-352 10 hours 

Philosophy 110 5 hours 

or 

Fine Arts E-300 5 hours 

Select 20 hours from two of the following: 

French, German or Spanish 121-122 10 hours 

Two additional laboratory (double) 

or 

Mathematics Courses 10 hours 

I Both physical and biological sciences will be covered in three-vear program.) 

English E-303 and E-304 10 hours 

Sociology E-315 and E-360 10 hours 

Medical Technology 

This is a two-year program for those students who wish to meet 
the requirements of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and 

* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
Btati d on page 64. 

** A studenl must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following de- 
partmenN: Foreign Language, Poltiical Science, Economics, Fine Arts, Home 
Economic-. Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, Mathematics (other than Math. 
19). 



TERMIN \L PROGR VMS 43 



who will complete their training at some approved Bchool of Medical 
Technology, in Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 

completion of the academic program described below. 

Armstrong College is affiliated with the Savannah School for 
Medical Technologists, which is nationally approved. It is possible 
for a -Indent to meet all requirements for national registration through 
these two institutions. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 11, 15— Freshman English 10 English 21, 22 10 

Historj 1 1. 15 — History of Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Biology 23 6 

Physical Education 11. 12 and 13 3 Biology 21 5 

Mathematics 16 5 Chemistry 13, 25 12 

Biology 14, 15 10 Electives 12 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 

TOTAL ~48 TOTAL 48 

Nursing 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation 
with the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission 
of the instructor and the approval of the student's adviser, a student 
not enrolled in the School of Nursing may take any of the following 
courses: 

Biology 18, 19 10 

Chemistry 11 5 

Sociology 20a 5 

Physical Education In M> 

Biology 21 5 

Home Economics In 4 

Psychology 21a 5 

TOTAL 34% 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

The curriculums for the Technical Institute Programs are set 
up on a two year basis to conform to the standard pattern of pro- 
grams leading to the degree of Associate in Science and to assist 
the student in planning his course of study. A student will not be 
required to complete the entire first-year program before enrolling 
for an advanced course: he mav enroll in such a course as soon as 
he has completed the prerequisities for it. 

Course descriptions for the Technical Institute Program are listed 
elsewhere in this Bulletin. The courses conducted by the Union Bag- 
Camp Paper Corporation are tentatively scheduled as indicated to 
assist the student in long range planning. No courses are as yet 
scheduled for the summer quarters, but additional courses will be 
scheduled in the summer if the demand warrants it. 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Chemical Technology 

The curriculum for Chemical Technology has been designed to 
meet the needs of the chemical, paper and other related heavy in- 
dustries for competent and well-trained technicians. The program 
gives the student a working knowledge of the fundamental branches 
of formal chemistry and chemical engineering. 

Industries are placing greater emphasis every year on instrumental 
methods of analysis which are far more rigid and precise than formal 
chemical methods. The student completing the curriculum in Chemical 
Technology will acquire training in the theory and use of these elec- 
tronic, optical and thermal instruments. 

Positions open to graduates are assistant to research personnel, 
control chemist, assistant to chemical engineers, analyst and pilot 
plant assistant, as well as many others. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114 5 Chemistry 113 5 

Mathematics 116, 117 10 Chemistry 125a. 125b 7 

Physics 111, 112 12 *GT 111 1% 

Chemistry 111, 112 10 *GT 112 3 

Engineering 111, 112 6 *GT 113 3 

Psychology 120 or 121a 5 *CT 120 3 

*CT 121 3 

*CT 160 2V 2 

*CT 161 2Ms 

*CT 162 2 

*CT 163 2 

*CT 165 4 

*CT 166 4 

TOTAL "48 Total 42% 

In addition, the student will select one of the two options listed 
below. 

Pulp and Paper Option Chemical Option 

*CT 140 4 Mathematics 120 3 

*CT 141 4% Engineering 113 3 

*CT 142 3 *CT 150 5 

*CT 143 3 *CT 151 3 

*CT 164 4 

TOTAL 18% TOT \L ~14 

Industrial Technology 

The curriculum in Industrial Technology is designed to enable the 
graduate to compete successfully for a variety of supervisory and 
management positions in manufacturing industries. These positions 
are in such categories as personnel work, quality control, methods 

* These courses will he conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion plant by company personnel. 



ERMIIS \L PROGR \\l> 



15 



qua 

and 



ami cost control, ami the equipment, plannin 
tions. The graduate will also be 
with transportation, distributing 
operation of private business. 

FIRST YEAR 
English 111 
Chemistry 111. 112 10 

Mathematics 116 5 

Physics 111. 112 12 

Economics 121, 124 10 

Engineering 111 3 

Business Vdministration 
2\ Vccountinc 5 



and 



production func- 



lified for many staff positions 
utilih companes, and for the 



TOTAL 



50 



SECOND YEAR 
Psychology 120 or 121a .5 

Engineering 1 12, 113 6 

Mathematics 117 5 

*GT 111 1% 

*GT 112 3 

*GT 113 3 

*IT 120 3 

*1T 121 3 

*1T 122 3 

♦IT 123 3 

* IT 124 3 

•IT 125 2 

•IT 126 3 

*IT 127 3 

TOTAL 16% 



Building Construction Technology 

Building Construction Technology deals with the design, con- 
struction and construction supervision of homes, industrial plants, 
business establishments, schools and hospitals. The student is taught 
to design, draw plans and follow through with construction details 
and methods. 

Graduates in this program will be qualified for employment in 
many positions, including engineering draftsman, general or building 
contractor, junior engineer, architectural draftsman and estimator, 
building inspector and many others. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114 — Freshman English 5 Civ. T 121 — Elementary 

Psychology 120 — Applied Surveying 6 

Psychology 5 BCT 121— Graphics 6 



Mathematics 116 — Algebra 5 

Mathematics 117 — Trigonometry 5 
Chemistry 111 — General 

Inorganic 5 

Physics 114 — Mechanics 5 

Physics 115 — Electricity 6 

Physics 116 — Heat. Sound. 

Light 5 

Engineering 111 — 

Engineering Drawing 3 

GT 113 — Technical Report 

Writing 3 

English 128 — Fundamentals 

of Speech 5 

BCT 141— Blueprint Reading . 3 



Mechani 



of 



Civ. T 143 

Materials 6 

BCT 211— Wood and Steel 

Construction 5 

BCT 212— Concrete 

Construction 5 

Civ. T 211— Structural 

Drafting 1 

Civ. T 212— Structural 

Drafting 11 

BCT 222— Building Design 1 
BCT 223— Building Design 11 
BCT 224— Building Design 111 
BCT 243 — Building Equipment 
BCT 244— Costs and Estimates 



* These courses will be conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation 
plant by Company personnel. 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Business Administration 127 — BCT 231 — Architectural 

Business Law 5 History 3 

BCT 142— Building Materials 3 

TOTAL 63 TOTAL 60 

Civil Technology 

Civil Technology covers one of the broader fields in the Technical 
Institute Program. The civil technician is a surveyor, a construction 
man on buildings of all kinds, highway and railroads, hydroelectric- 
projects, locks, dams, tunnels and similar projects. He is trained to 
handle work in any of these fields with a minimum of supervision. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114 — Freshman English 5 Civ. T 121 — Elementary 

Psychology 120 — Applied Surveying 6 

Psychology 5 Civ. T 122 — Route Surveying 5 

Mathematics 116 — Algebra 5 Civ. T 131 — Highwav Construction 3 

Mathematics 117— BCT 211— Wood and Sto 1 

Trigonometry 5 Construction 5 

Chemistry 111 — General BCT 212 — Concrete Construction . 5 

Inorganic 5 Civ. T 212 — Structural Drafting 1 2 

Physics 114 — Mechanics 5 Civ. T 213 — Structural 

Physics 115 — Electricity 6 Drafting 11 2 

Physics 116- -Heat, Sound, Civ. T 224 — Topographic and 

Light 5 Contour Surveying 1 

Engineering 111— Civ. T 223 — Land Surveys 5 

Engineering Drawing 3 Civ. T 232 — Heavy Construction 4 

GT 113— Technical Civ. T 241— Hydraulics 5 

Report Writing 3 Civ. T 242 — Water and Sewage 

English 128 — Fundamentals Plant Operation 3 

of Speech 5 Civ. T 251 — Photcgrammetrv 2 

BCT 141— Blueprint Reading 3 Civ. T 143— Mechanics of 

Business Administration 127 — Materials 6 

Business Law 5 BCT 244— Costs and Estimates 4 

BCT 142— Building Materials _3 

TOTAL 63 TOTAL 61 

Electrical Technology 

The student in Electrical Technology is trained in the fields of 
electric power generation, transmission, distribution and utilization, 
as well as the theory and application of electrical and electronic cir- 
cuits, electrical machinery and industrial control equipment, wiring 
and illumination. 

Graduates of the electrical course are qualified to fill positions 
as production and maintenance technicians, laboratory and research 
technicians, electrical draftsmen, powerhouse operators and electrical 
equipment sales and service personnel. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

English 114— Freshman English 5 Elec. T 122 — Alternating 

Ps\chology 120 — Applied Current Circuits 11 6 

P-\chology 5 Elec. T 131 — Basic Electronics 6 

Mathematics 116 — Algebra 5 Elec. T 223 — Alternating 

Mathematics 117— T: igonometry 5 Current Circuits 111 4 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 



Mathematics 1l'i> Analytical 
I reometr) and ( lalculus 

Phyaica 111 Mechanics 

Physics 1 15 El ctricit) 

Physics 1 16 Heat, Sound, Lighl 

Engineering 111 — 
Engineering Drawing 

GT 113 Technical 
Report \\ riting 

English 128 — Fundamentals 
• if Speech 

Elec. T 121— Alternating- 
Current Circuits 1 

BCT 141— Blurpiint Reading 



TOTAL 



Hire. T 231 Electrical Drawing 2 

.") Elec. T 232 Industrial 

5 Electronics 6 

6 Elec. T 241— Communications 

.") Circuits 6 

Elec. T 251 Direct Current 
3 Machinery 4 

Elec. T 252 — Alternating- 
3 Current Machinery 1 . . 6 

Elec. T 253— Alternating 

5 Current Machinery 11 6 
Elec. T 271— Wiring Methods 4 

6 Elec. T 272— Illumination 3 

3 Elec. T 273— Electric Power 

Distribution 3 

Business Administration 127 — 

Business Law 5 

"61 TOTAL "61 



Electronics and Communications Technology 

This course is planned to give the student training in the fields 
of electrical and electronic circuitry, transmission lines, radiation, wave 
filters, instrumentation and test equipment, telephony, AM and FM 
radio, television and radar. 

Students completing the electronics course should be able to fill 
responsible positions as production and maintenance technicians and 
project and control technicians in the fields of radio, television, X-ray 
and radar; electronics laboratory and research technicians and elec- 
tronic equipment sales and service technicians. 

FIRST YEAR 

English 114 — Freshman 

English 5 

Psychology 120 — Applied 

Psychology 5 

Mathematics 116 — Algebra 5 

Mathematics 117 — Trigonometry . 5 
Mathematics 120 — Analytical 

Geometry and Calculus 5 

Physics 114 — Mechanics 5 

Physics 115 — Electricity 6 

Physics 116 — Heat, Sound. Light 5 

Engineeringlll — 

Engineering Drawing 3 

GT 113 — Technical 

Report Writing 3 

English 128 — Fundamentals 

of Speech 5 

Elec. T 121— Alternating- 
Current Circuits 1 6 

BCT 141— Blueprint Reading 3 



TOTAL 61 



SECOND YEAR 

Elec. T 122— Alternating- 
Current Circuits 11 6 

Elec. T 131 — Basic Electronics 6 

Elec. T 223— Alternating- 
Current Circuits 111 4 

Elec. T 232— Industrial 

Electronics 6 

Elec. T 233— Advanced 

Electronics 4 

Elec. T 241 — Communications 

Circuits 1 6 

Elec. T 242 — Communications 

Circuits 11 6 

Elec. T 243 — Communications 

Circuits 111 4 

Eiec. T 254— Electrical 

Machinery 3 

Elec. T 261 — Communications 

Technology 1 7 

Elec. T 262 — Communications 

Technology 11 6 

Elec. T 263 — Television 

Technology 6 

TOTAL 64 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to l 1 1 withdraw any course 
for which less than ten students register. (2) limit the enrollment in 
an\ course or class section. (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as demand and 
staff personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed. 

Courses which are offered in the day program are assigned a 
number which is less than 100. All Evening College courses are 
numbered above 100. In some course descriptions Evening College 
course numbers appear in parentheses. For example: Biology 16-17 
(116-117). 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture: the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory: and the third, the number of 
quarter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Human Bi- 
ology (5-0-5). 

The quarters indicating when courses will be taught apply to the 
dav sessions only, not the Evening College. 

ART 

Art 11 — Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. 

Drawing, painting and design principle-, with some pertinent 
background history. Introductory practice in techniques, and appli- 
cation to everyday life needs. 

irt 113 — Ceramics 1 5-0-5 i . Laboratory fee: $2.00 

\ beginner's course in the fundamentals of potterv and clay 
modeling. Various ways of forming cla\. decorating, glazing and 
firing suitable subjects. 

lit 111 — Ceramics (5-0-5). Laboratory fee: 82.00. 

\ continuation of the beginner's course with emphasis on design. 
Using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Work 
mav be developed in potter\ or clay sculpture. 



< 01 USE DESCRIPTIONS 49 

BIOLOGY 

Biology 11 illli General Botany (3-4-5). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$4.00. 

\ stud) of the structure of roots, stems and leaves, basic physiology 
and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative species. 

Biology 12 (112) — General Botany (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory 
fee $4.00. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

\ stud) of reproduction, heredity and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes frequent field trips. 

Biology 14 (114) — General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey 
of the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species 
of the basic invertebrate phyla. 

Biology 15 (115) — General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. 
Laboratory fee. $4.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Study of vertebrate structure and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. 

Biology 16-17 (116-1171 — Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Four lectures and one demonstration period. 

A non-laboratory course beginning with a survey of the basic 
biological principles and continuing with a study of the structure 
and function of the human body. The second quarter is a continuation 
of the first and concludes with a study of the principles of genetics 
and evolution. No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is 
completed. 

Biology 18-19 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (3-4-5). Fall 
and Winter. Laboratory fee, $4.00 each quarter. 

A two-quarter course considering the gross anatonn. histology and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physiol- 
ogy. Not for pre-medical and pre-dental students. 

Biology 21 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory fee. $5.00. 
Prerequisites: Ten hours of a biological science with a laboratory and 
five hours of inorganic chemistry. 

An introduction to micro-organisms with primary emphasis on 
bacteria. The morphology, life history and public health importance 
of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa and helminthes are 
considered. 



50 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-61. Fall. Lab- 
oratory fee. $6.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of 
the vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus. Necturus and the cat. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration 24 (124) — Principles of Accounting, In- 
troductory (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, accounting 
statements, controlling accounts, special journals and the accounting 
system. 

Business Administration 25 (125) — Principles of Accounting, In- 
troductory (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 24. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 27 (127) — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. 

Law governing the basic prnnciples applicable to the following sub- 
jects. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, 
rights of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, lia- 
bilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilites of parties, discharge. 

Business Administration 28 (128) — Business Lau (5-0-5). Spring. 

The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the fol- 
lowing subjects which are of particular interest to those planning to 
major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of 
partners, termination. Corporation: formation, powers, rights of se- 
curity holders, types of securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, 
remedies. 

Business Administration 29 (129 1 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
and other concerns, stressing the securing of unit costs under both 
the order and the process methods. 

Business Administration 34 (134 1 — Principles of Accounting, In- 
termediate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 

Basic accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an 
application of accounting theory. 



COI RSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 

Business idministration 35 (135) Intermediate Accounting 
(5-0-5). Second course. Prerequisite: Business Administration 34 

i 1 34 1 . 

\ continuation of Business Administration 34 (134) emphasizing 

the theories of valuation of fixed assets and lial>ilt\ accounts, the ap- 
plication of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis <»f these theories. 

Business Administration 36 (136) — Income Tax Accounting 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

\ study of federal income tax laws and the application of these 
laws to the income tax returns of individuals, partnerships and corpor- 
ations. 

Business Administration 37 (137 I — Tax Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 36 (136). 

A continuation of Business Administration 36 (136) with em- 
phasis on corporations and fiduciary returns and social security taxes, 
gift taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cation. Stress is placed upon the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Business Administration 116 — Report Writing. (5-0-5). 

Study and practice of effective English in business letters, technical 
papers and engineering reports. 

Business Administration 131 — Retail Advertising and Sales Pro- 
motion (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

A course in retail advertising and sales promotion basically con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields — emphasing the psychology 
of advertising as a branch of sales. The course explores the various 
media and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an 
advertising course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the 
average salesman. 

Business Administration 141 — Advanced Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 35 (135). 

A study of the problems of partnerships, parent and subsidiary ac- 
counting, consignments, installment accounting and other specialized 
accounting problems. 



ARMSTRONG COLL.EG& 

LIBRARY 



52 ARMSTRON G COLLEGE O F SAVANNAH 

Business Administration 142 — Advanced Accounting I 5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 141. 

A continuation of Business Administration 111. 

Business Administration 143 — Auditing Theory (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 25 ( 125 l . 

Principles governing audits and audit procedure and a study of 
the practical application of accounting knowledge as applied to audit 
procedures. 

Business Administration 145 — C. P. A. Review (5-0-5). Prerequis- 
ite: Advanced Accounting and Auditing. 

A review of the interpretation of the federal income tax laws as 
applied to individuals, partnerships, estates and trusts; also a review 
of the methods of ascertaining and distributing cost in manufacturing 
concerns emphasizing the securing of costs under the job order, process 
and standard methods. 

Business Administration 151 — Introduction to Transportation 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

History of transportation: developments leading to legislative 
supervision of railroads; developments leading to Federal regulation 
of carriers, other than railroads: freight classifications: principles of 
freight rates and tariffs. 

Business Administration 152 — Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 151 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application: special freight serv- 
ices; freight claims, overcharge and loss and damage; freight tariff 
circulars: construction and filing of tariffs: terminal facilities and 
switching: and demurrage. 

Business Administration 153 — Intermediate Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 152. or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Reconsignment and diversion: transit privileges: rules governing 
stopping in transit shipments for partial unloading and to complete 
loading: weights, weighing, and payment of freight charges: ware- 
housing and distribution: material handling: and packaging. 

Business Administration 154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 153. or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Through routes and rates: milling in transit; technical tariff and 
rate interpretation: overcharges and undercharges: loss and damage 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 53 



claims; import and export traffic: and classification committee pro* 

ct dine. 

Business ti/m inistra/ion L55 Interstate Commerce Laic. (5-0-5). 

Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration L54, or permission of 
the instructor. 

Evolution of Interstate Commerce Act; construction of Interstate 
Commerce \ct : interpretation and application of Interstate Commerce 
Act: application of penalties under the Interstate Commerce Act; crea- 
tion and organization of Interstate Commerce Commission; practice 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business Administration 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission 
and Public Service Commission Procedure. (5-0-5). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Business Administration 156, or permission of the instructor. 

Practice before Interstate Commerce Commission; statutory au- 
thority for awarding damages: revision of Commission's decision; 
general review. 

Business Administration 160 — Principles of Management. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Business Administration 161 — Principles of Insurance. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 
tion of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted in- 
surance practices. 

Business Administration 162 — Real Estate Principles. (5-0-51. 
Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

A consideration of the general principles of property utilization, 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens; the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulatory legislation. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 11 (111) — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall. Laboratory 
fee, S3. 00. Laboratory breakage fee, S3.00'"". Prerequisite: Two years of 
high school algebra, Mathematics 9, or consent of instructor. 

* Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or broken 
and all requirements of the laboratory have been complied with. 



54 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The chemistry <>f some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and 
their applications. 

Chemistry 12 (112) — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee $3.00. Laboratory hreakage fee. $3.00*. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 11. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 11. 

Chemistry 13 (113) — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00*. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 12. 

A study of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of com- 
mon cations and anions by semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 24 (124) — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Fall. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00.* Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 15, 18 or its equivalent. 

A study of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 
common cations and anions by semi-micro methods. ( Not offered in 
1957-58). 

Chemistry 25a (125a) — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-6-4). 
Winter. Laboratory fee. 85.00. Laboratory breakage fee. S3. (X).* Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 13 or approval of the instructor. 

A study of the fundamental theories and applications of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. No credit 
is given for this course before completion of Chemistry 25b. 

Chemistry 25b (125b) — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (1-6-3). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00.* Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 25r or its evuivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 25a. 

Commerce 

Commerce 11a — Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and mastery of the keyboard. 

Commerce 116 — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). Winter 
and Spring. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

* Refundable at the < ad of each quarter if no items have been lost or broken 
and all requirements of the laboratory have been complied with. 



cot RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



This course is a continuation <»f speed development In addition. 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce We Intermediate Typing. (0-5-2). Spring. Labora- 
tory fee. $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-h or equivalent. 

\ typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as buisness letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 12a-b — Beginning Shorthand i 5-0-5) . Fall and Winter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12c — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 13a — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thor- 
ough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the 
operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 136 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Winter. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixing decimal, percentages, discounts and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain, 
cipher, divisions, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

T\pical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 21a — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 



56 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

curac) including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 

business papers. 

Commerce 216 — A continuation of Commerce 21a (0-5-21. Win- 
tor. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

Commerce 21c— A continuation of Commerce 216 (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. An average of 60 words is attained. 

Commerce 22a — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequis- 
ites: Commerce 12a, b, c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in transcrib- 
ing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business ma- 
terial; the second half, to dictation material applying to major voca- 
tions. 

Commerce 22b — A continuation of Commerce 22a I 5-0-5 I . Winter. 

Commerce 22c — A continuation of Commerce 22b (5-0-5). Spring. 
A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 23a — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the ma- 
chine and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, 
hardware, electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, 
packing house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, depart- 
ment stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 236 — A continuation of Commerce 23a ( 0-5-2 t . Winter. 
Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

Commerce 23c — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-21. 
Spring. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are? 
stressed in this last period. 



Economics 

Economics 21 (121) — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

\ stud} of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
presenl time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 (12-1 1 — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 21. 





\ 


continuation 
in Economics 


»f tl 
9 1 


c — 1 1 1 « 1 x 


»t 


"gUll 


Z 1 . 






E 


■onomics 125- 


Elemental 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 



if economic principles and problem 



Economic Statistics (5-0-5). 

\n introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart making: elementary 
Statistical procedures and their economic interpretation: introduction 
to index and time series analysis. 

Economics L26 — American Economic History 15-0-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
I n i led States from the colonial period to the present with major 
emphasis on the period since 1860. It will deal with agriculture, in- 
dustry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, money 
and banking, and finance. 

Economics 127 — Money and Banking l 5-0-5 I . Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 124. 

The role of money in the economic organization: monetary theor\ : 
methods of stabilizing the price level: the integration of financial in- 
stitutions: theory of bank deposits and elasticity of bank currency: 
discount policy and the interest rate of central banks: methods of 
regulating credit and business activities. 

Economics 128 — Principles of Marketing (5-0-51. Prerequisite: 
Economics 124. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers: marketing functions: marketing 
manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products: pro- 
posals for improving the marketing structure. 

Economics 129 — Labor Economics (5-0-51. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 124. 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern labor 
organizations and their remarkable growth in recent years. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects 
of our labor problems including the study of wages, working condi- 
tions, unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hour-, 
workers welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future 
developments along these lines. 

Economics 130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Prerequisites: 
Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
istration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 



58 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded per- 
sonnel program. 

Economic* 131 Government and Business ( 5-0-5 i. Prerequisite: 
Economics 124. 

A general surw\ of the economic aspects of business regulation 
by the government, with specific reference to regulatory developments 
and methods in the United States: other activities affecting business 
in general, as extension of loans and subsidies, maintenance of fact- 
finding agencies and government owned corporation. 

Economics 132 — Investments. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 
127. 

A study of stocks and bonds, market operations, investment mathe- 
matics, investment policies and financial statements. 

Education 

Education 11 — Orientation to Education (5-0-5). Fall. 

For the beginning or prospective teacher, this subject offers a 
broad understanding of the American spirit in education, the place of 
the school in society, its growth and changing function as a social in- 
stitution. The problem and discussion approach is used. 

Engineering 

Engineering 11 (111) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of study include lettering: the use of the instruments: 
orthographic projection: auxiliary views: sections and conventions. 

Engineering 12 (112) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions; dimensions: pic- 
torial representation: threads and fastenings: shop processes: technical 
sketching: working drawings: pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 (113) — Engineering Drawing ( 0-6-3 L Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings: 
working drawings: ink tracing on cloth: working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 19 (119) — Applied Descriptive Geometry (0-6-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 59 

lines, and piano 1»\ use of auxiliary news; the solution of problems 

involving points, lines, and planes b) revolution methods: simple inter- 
Bections; developments of surfaces; an introduction to warped sur- 
faces. Practical applications arc emphasized. 

English 

Students will he assigned to freshman English according to results 
of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

English 14A ( 114A )— Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. 

This course includes theme writing, with emphasis on correct and 
forceful expression. The student also reads and discusses such works 
as the Iliad, the Odyssey, and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euri- 
pedes. 

English 14B (114B) — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall, Winter. 

This course is essential) the same as English 14A, but more time 
is devoted to grammar, punctuation and spelling. In theme writing, 
emphasis is placed on clarity of communication. 

English 15A (115A) — A continuation of English 14A (5-0-5). 
Fall. Winter and Spring. 

The student reads and discusses selections from such authors as 
Montaigne, Swift, Dickens and English and American poets. Theme 
writing is continued with practice in preparing documented papers. 

English 15B (115B) — A continuation of English 14B (5-0-5). 
Winter, Spring. 

This course is essentially the same as English 15A, but more time 
is given to correct expression in writing. A documented paper is pre- 
pared. 

English 21 (121) — Sophomore English — World Literature (5-0-5). 

Fall and Winter. 

A study is made of some of the works of Shakespeare. Goethe's 

Faust, and selections from the Bible. 

English 22 (122)— Sophomore English— World Literature (5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. 

Selected modern poetry, drama and novels are read, both American 
and European. 

English 24 — An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 



60 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

\ Btud) of the \ari<»us types and forms of poetr) with special 
emphasis on more recent poetry. 

English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Fall. (Not offered in 

L957-58). 

A surve\ of American literature and culture. Each student is 
asked to select one particular period or area or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 
The course is primarily conducted by reading and discussion. 

English 27 — Modern Drama (5-0-5). Fall. 

Class reading and discussion of modern plays from Ibsen's 
"Ghosts" to Miller's "Death of a Salesman." The course is centered 
on appreciation of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 
reading selected plays aloud. 

English 28 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Winter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gives some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, pho- 
netics, gesture, articulation, pronunciation, and regional speech dif- 
ferences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the fundamentals 
of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, extemporaneous, 
impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 30 — Principles of Theatre Art (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study and discussion of the fundamentals involved in the devel- 
opment of dramatic art and in the staging methods which have been 
and are now utilized in producing drama. The course will develop 
chronologically and will relate directly to historical events and to the 
changing form and method of writing for the stage. 

French 

French 11-12 (111-112) — Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

A course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well 
as grammar and reading. No credit for graduation will be given until 
the sequence is completed. 

French 21 (121) — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 ( 122) — Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 



CO] RSE DESCRIPTIONS 61 

Further reading <>f texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 

Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 

school French. 

A sur\e\ course. Reading of texts, written and oral reports on 
collateral reading. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequis- 
ite: French 22. 

Selected plays of Corneille. Moliere and Racine. 

Geography 

Geography 111 — World Human Geography (5-0-5). 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activities 
and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

German 

German 11-12 ( 111-112)— Beginning German (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

Drill upon pronuciation and elements of grammar, conversation, 
and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as much 
as practicable in the classroom instruction. The idiomatic use of the 
language will be studied. Reading of texts and translations. Conversa- 
tion, dictation, and dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 
German 21 (121) — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring. 

Grammar review and comparative grammar studied with the view 
of enabling students to write compositions. Short stories, life situations 
in Germany, German magazines, memorization of famous German 
songs. Conversation and dialogues. 

Health 

Health 111 — Personal and Community Health Problems (5-0-5). 

This course considers the meaning of health and factors influencing 
health behavior; health problems as related to the individual: overview 
of world, national, state and local health problems: community health 
organizations: mobilizing and evaluating community health resources. 



62 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNA H 

The legal aspects in community health and the laws governing re- 
portable diseases is given special attention. 

History 

History 11 (114) — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary 

(Virilization I 5-0-5 I . Fall. Winter, and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western Civi- 
lization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present 
time. 

History 15 (115) — A continuation of History 14 (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Dante, Machiavelli, Descartes. 
Locke, Jefferson. Rousseau. Adam Smith, Malthus, Marx and others. 

History 24 — History of England (5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from earl) 
times to the present with special emphasis given to developments since 
the Tudor period. 

History 25 (125) — Recent European History (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 
voted to the first World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing that war and the complex of world events which preceded the Sec- 
ond World War. 

History 26 (126) — Recent American History (5-0-5). Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1865 to the present time. 

Home Economies 

Home Economics in — Nutrition and Food Preparation (3-2-4). 
Winter. Laboratory fee. 81.00. 

\ stud) of the laws governing the food requirements of human 
beings for maintenance of growth, activity, reproduction, and lactation. 
Complete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 10 — Orientations: Careers and Personal Develop- 
ment (5-0-5). Fall. 



CO! RSE DESCRIPTIONS 63 



The main opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselor! 
and other- will he discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
\ i»it the class t<> shorn the many vocations dealing with the home. 

How to he more attractive through personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics 11 (111) — Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. 

Planning and making individual wardrobes. Fashions, design and 
fabrics are studied. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Home Economics 12 — Foods (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory fee. 
$7.00. 

This course is based on the human food needs. Preparation and 
attractive serving of meals is studied. 

Home Economics 21 — Home Furnishings (4-2-5). Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee. $2.50. 

The interior and exterior planning of the home is studied. Em- 
phasis is placed on style of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economics 23 — Elementary Textiles and Clothing for the 

Family (2-6-5). Spring. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Practical application of elementary textile study to the selection 
and use of clothing for the family. 

Home Economics 24 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course in the family with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

Home Economics 131 — School Lunch Room Management (5-0-5). 

A study of the management of school lunchrooms, including menu 
planning, purchasing, preparation and service of food, record keeping, 
personnel management and equipment. Emphasis is given to the rela- 
tion of the lunchroom to the total school program. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 8 (108) — Plane Geometry (5-0-5). 

Topics of study include rectilinear figures, congruent triangles, the 
circle, similar figures and polygons. 

(Students will not receive college credit for this course if they 



(.1 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



have completed one unit of high school credit in geometry.) (Not of- 
fered in da) school in 1957-58). 

Mathematics 9 (109) — Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and 
Spring. 

This course includes a study of fractions, signed numbers, linear 
and quadratic equations, ratio, proportion, variation and graphs. 

(Students will not receive college credit for this course if the) 
have completed two units of high school credit in algebra.) 

Mathematics 16 (116) — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or Mathematics 9. 

The course consists of functions and graphs, logarithms, linear and 
quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and the 
elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 (117) — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the solution of trigonometric equations, proof of trigonometric identi- 
ties, graphs of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric 
functions. 

Mathematics 18 (118) — Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, elementary conic sec- 
tions, polar coordinates, transcendental curves and transformation of 
coordinates. (Not offered in 1957-58). 

Mathemaiics 19 (119) — Mathematics of Finance (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The necessary 
aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be studied. 

Mathematics 20 (120) — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, graphs of functions, 
limits, differentiation of algebraic functions and some applications 
of derivatives. 

Mathematics 21 (121) — Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 20. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 65 

This course includes the differentiation and integration <>f poly- 
nomials, problems in maxima and minima, approximations l>v differen- 
tials, area-, volumes, centroids, moment of inertia and work. 

Mathematics 22 I 122 I Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. 

Pren ■ijui>ite: Mathematics 21. 

\ continuation of Mathematics 21. This course includes differen- 
tiation of transcendental functions with application to rates. velocU\ 
ami acceleration, curvature and Newton's Method. It also includes for- 
mulas and methods of integration. 

Mathematics 23 (123) — Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 

A continuation of Mathematics 22. This course includes Simpsons 
rule, indeterminate forms, series, hyperbolic functions, partial deriva- 
tives and multiple integrals. 

Mathematics 114^-The Slide Rule (1-2-2). 

An intensive study and practice in the use of all scales including 
the solutions of problems using the trigonometric scales. 

Music 

Music 11 — Elementary Theory and Sight Reading (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dic- 
tation, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmony are 
included. 

Music 12 — Theory and Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 11. 

A continuation of Music 11. with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 (120) — Music Appreciation. (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and re- 
corded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 18a— Piano (1-0-2). 

Beginning or intermediate piano for the adult student. One hour 
lesson per week. Special fee — $45.00. 

Music 18b — Piano. A continuation of Music 18a (1-0-2). 



66 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Music lor — Piano. A continuation of Music 186. (1-0-2). 
Music 19a— Voice. (1-0-2). 

Fundamental instruction in voice production, diction, articulation, 
breath control, physical and mental poise, applied in the study of 
songs. One hour lesson per week. Special fee. S45.00. 

Music 196 — Voice. A continuation of Music 19a ( 1-0-2 I . 

Music 19c — Voice. A continuation of Music 19b. i L-0-2). 

Music 22a — Piano. A continuation of Music 18c. (1-0-2). 

Music 22b — Piano. A continuation of Music 22a. ( 1-0-2 l. 

Music 22c — Piano. A continuation of Music 22b. (1-0-2). 

Music 23a — Voice. A continuation of Music 19c. (1-0-2). 

Music 236 — Voice. A continuation of Music 23a. (1-0-2). 

Music 23c — Voice. A continuation of Music 236. (1-0-2). 

(No practice facilities are available at the college. The student 
must have access to private practice facilities in order to enroll for ap- 
plied music courses. ) 

Philosophy 

Philosophy 10 (110) — Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5). 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of phil- 
osophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the relation 
of philosophy to art. science and religion. Includes a survey of the 
basic issues and major tvpes in philosophy, and shows their sources 
in experience, history and representative thinkers. 

Physical Education 

Phyical Education 11 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, dual combatives. and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 — Team Sports (0-3-1 I. Winter. 

Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). Winter. 
Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or equivalent. 

Consists of a studv of rules interpretation and actual experience 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



hi coaching and officiating in class and intramural panics. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 First Aid and Saftey Education (4-0-3). 
Winter. Elective Credit. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
In a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 22 — Elementary Boxing for Men (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' Course 
in Suimming (2-3-2). Spring. 

Physical Education 24 — Boxing for Teachers (2-3-2). Winter. 

Physical Education 25 — Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 26 — Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter/ 

Physical Education 27 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 28 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 

Consists of passive, semi-active and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 — Folk Rhythms for Teachers (2-3-2). FalL 

This course consists of advanced training in folk dances and prac- 
tice teaching of those dances. 

Physical Education 31 — Wrestling for Men (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Science 

Physical Science 11 (111) (5-0-5). Fall. No prerequisite. 

A study of the scientific method and its use in the attempt of man 
to describe and explain the nature of the physical universe. This will 
include the study of fundamentals of physics and astronomy with some 
example of the applications of this knowledge in providing a better 
living for man. An attempt is made to go from the study of the large 
universe to the study of the small fundamental particles of which the 
universe is composed. 

Physical Science 12 (112) (5-0-51. Winter. Prerequisite: Physical 
Science 11. 



68 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

\ continuation of Physical Science 11. In this course emphasis is 
placed on the -tw<l\ of the principles <>f inorganic and organic chem- 
i v t r \ with some examples of the application of chemistry in household, 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 
structure of the fundamental particles of matter I atoms and molecules I 
is used in the stud\ of the classification of the simple components of 
matter ( elements I and the changes which they undergo to form more 
complex suhstances (compounds). 

Physics 

Physics 11 (111 I — General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: a course in college mathematics or consent 
of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 (112) — General Physics (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 11 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of electricity, sound and light. 

Physics 14 (114) — General Physics — Mechanics. (4-2-5). Fall. 
Laboratory fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Two years of high school alegebra. 
Mathematics 9. or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics. Force and motion, work and power, 
energy, torque, and properties of gases are included. 

Physics 15 (115) — General Physics — Electricity. (5-2-6). Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 14 or consent of the 
instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cov- 
ering the fields of magnetism, electric circuits, electric energy and 
power, electromagnetic induction, and alternating current. 

Physics 16 (116) — General Physics — Heat, Sound, and Light. 
(4-2-5). Spring. Laboratorv fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 14 or 
consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of heat, sound and light. Under heat will be studied tem- 
perature measurement, thermal expansion, heat quantities, heat trans- 
fer, and thermodynamic*. The study of sound includes wave motion, 
sound waves, and acoustics. Light includes reflection, refraction, spec- 
tra, color, and polarized light. 

Physics 21 ( 121 1— Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall. 



CO] RSE DESCRIPTIONS 69 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisite: Mathematics 18. 

\n Intensive course in mechanics. Hie course includes the stud) 
of statics, kinetic-, energy, power, friction, machines, elasticity, hy- 
drostatics and mechanics of gases. 

Physics 22 (122)— Electricity (5-3-6). Winter. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisites: Mathematics 21 and Phys- 
ics 21. 

The course includes the study of magnetism, electrostatics, current 
electricity and its effect and some electrical instruments. 

Physics 23 I 123) — Heat. Sound and Light (5-3-6). Spring. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisites: Mathematics 21 and 
Physics 22. 

This course includes basic concepts in heat and thermodynamics. 
sound, properties of light and a study of some optical instruments. 

Political Science 

Political Science 12 (112) — The Governments of Foreign Powers 
i5-()-5). 

\ study is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. (Not offered in day session 1957-58). 

Political Science 13 (113) — Government of the United States 
(5-0-5). Fall. Winter and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and workings of the na- 
tional government in the United States and some of the major problems 
of the state and local government. The course shows how developmental 
practice has created our government as it stands today. 

Psychology 

Psychology 20 (120.1 — Applied Psychology (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course is an orientation into college and into the choice of a 
career. The objective aids developed in the field of psychology will be 
used to discover effective ways of learning in general, and of studying 
in the college setting. Methods of objective measurement of a person's 
intelligence, interests, special aptitudes and personality traits will be 
explored and demonstrated. These will be applied to problems of edu- 
cational, vocational, and special interest training. For persons already 
in employment, special problems of personnel management and produc- 
tion output may be studied by modern psychological principles and 
techniques. Insofar as possible each student will have an opportunity to 



70 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

develop projects in the fields that will be useful in his own plans for 
education and career. 

Psychology 21a I 121a) — Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

This course introduces the student to how the basic psychological 
processes operate and affect the behavior of the individual. Facts about 
patterns of growth from birth to maturity, learning to observe and deal 
objectively with the real world, having motivation, emotions, conflict 
and frustration are explored and applied to the student's present daily 
experience. Special study is given to unconscious influences on be- 
havior in the study of mechanisms of defense and ways of directing 
these processes into more realistic and creative use of one's feelings, 
understandings and actions. By the end of the course the student is 
expected to be able to see these processes at work in a given example of 
behavior and to begin to see the interaction of all these processes in 
a given act or experience. In the seminar type of class discussion the 
focus is on one of these topics. The discussion objective is for each 
student, after study, to share his concept of the topic or some phase 
of it, link it with the information in the text, and test it against his 
own experiences. 

Psychology 21b (121b) — Experimental Psychology (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Psychology 21a (121a). 

In this course the principles explained in Psychology 21a will be 
tested and explored by special projects and experimentation. Each 
student will select from a choice of topics introduced in 21a at least one 
systematic experiment and one live project, develop his plan of pro- 
cedure, carry out his study according to approved objective methods 
and prepare a satisfactory written report. Class time will be used for 
group consultation in order that each member will follow the work 
of each other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. Top- 
ics suitable for a special study project include aspects of child develop- 
ment or special behavior aspects of children, maturation, emotions, 
conflict, frustrations, mechanisms of defense, sensory processes, per- 
ception, learning, remembering, thinking, personality adjustment. 

Psychology 22 (122)— Social Psychology (5-0-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21a (121a) or consent of instructor. 

This course centers on a study of the individual's interaction with 
his social groups (family, friendship groups, clubs, church groups, com- 
munity groups). Forces of need, emotion and interests that bind the 
individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group interaction are 
analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used for experiencing 
the processes of communication and interaction in a group setting. 
Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, group conflicts, social 






COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 71 



stratification, mass communication, propaganda, public opinion forma* 

lion and methods of changing group patterns arc studied, both 1>\ con 
Bulting the reports of responsible studies and by group projects. 

Social Science 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). 

\ stud) of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce: population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 

Sociology 

Sociology 20a 1 120a) — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter. 

Sociology is the objective study of the interrelationships of people 
as they interact with each other. This course presents information 
which ha? been gathered by systematic and scientific studies of human 
society. Material is drawn from Social Psychology on how an indi- 
vidual is "socialized" to interact with other people within his culture. 
This leads to some objective study of population patterns and the 
special distribution of people, occupational patterns of human com- 
munities, traits and characteristics of culture groups, typical features of 
group behavior and of the effect of mass communication on public 
opinion. Looking at mankind as a whole, his institutions of family, re- 
ligion, economic behavior and political behavior are studied as stable 
patterns for meeting basic human needs, and as infinitely varied patterns 
adapted to the needs of different human groups. This introduction to 
sociology is successful if it leads the student into a more informed 
identification with wider segments of the human family and if he gains 
knowledge of objective methods for fact-gathering in his efforts to un- 
derstand his human environment. 

Sociology 20b (120b)— -Social Problems (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Sociology 20a (120a). 

In this course the principles explored in Sociology 20a will be ex- 
plored in planned projects of social research, supervised participation 
and/ or analysis of local community resources. These will take form in 
accordance with student interest and actual cooperative resources of 
community organizations and personnel. Suggested areas of study 
are the fields of health (physical and mental), poverty, employment, 
education, government, crime (juvenile and adult), dependent children, 
housing, recreation, resources for the aged and others that reveal 
community problems or programs. Class time will be used for group 
consultation in order that each member will follow the work of each 
other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. At the end 
of the course a practical analysis will be made of how social change 



72 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

takes place in a community, with attention to the implications for 
change in national and international communities. For those v. ho elect 
the Human Relations Concentration, a Bpecial seminar will be held at 
the end of this course for evaluating the students' experience in the 
whole Human Relations sequence. 

Sociology 21 (121) — Marriage and the Family. (5-0-5). Win- 
ter and Spring. 

This course first introduces the student to the basic uniformities 
vet infinite varieties of human families. He selects for studying the 
family pattern in a culture different from his own, and then studies the 
impact of our own culture as it influences the roles and interactions of 
a tvpical family. This should give some sociological understanding 
of the family as a cultural institution. The rest of the course focuses 
on the individual within our culture growing and learning to love in a 
mature marital union. The early childhood learnings which affect 
basic attitudes toward parents, authority, the giving and receiving of 
love, and anger are presented from the findings of analytic psychol- 
ogy. Then each stage in the preparation for marriage is discussed: 
dating, courting, engagement, marriage, adjustment to money? sex, re- 
ligion, in-laws, friends and children. Some practical studies of budget, 
house planning, settling differences, using help, etc. are worked out as 
projects. A prominent physician is guest lecturer on specialized infor- 
mation affecting the physical adjustment to marriage and parenthood. 
Through the process of free discussions in the group, the students begin 
to experience the "give and take'' that grows into honesty and mutual 
respect. The experience of this process is used as a way of learning 
the reciprocal interaction that is basic to mature love of another person. 

Spanish 

Sjxinish 111-112 — Elementary (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. 

Spanish 121 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar and to delve into the fine points of the 
language. 

Spanish 122 Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students 1 facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish litera- 
ture and current Spanish newspapers are read. 



COT RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Technical Institute Program 

Courses arc designated as follow-: 

GT General Technology for courses which arc common t<» se^ 
eral concentrations. 

CI Chemical Technology. 

IT — Industrial Technology. 

BCT — Building Construction Technology. 

Elec. T — Electrical and Electronic Technology. 

Civ. T — Civil Technology . 

General Technology 

GT 111— Industrial Safety (l%-0-l%). 

A basic study of industrial accident prevention considering the 
nature and extent of the accident problem. A practical study is given 
the technique for control of industrial hazards together with the funda- 
mentals of good organization. 

GT 112— Public Speaking. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: English 114 
or the equivalent. 

Study and practice in the fundamentals of public speaking. The 
subject includes training in selecting a subject, obtaining and organ- 
izing material, and presenting speeches effectively. Each student 
makes several speeches before an audience. 

GT 113 — Technical Report Writing. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: English 
114 or the equivalent. 

Study of the fundamentals of technical writing style and mechan- 
ics with practice in preparing reports of various types most likely to be 
used on the job by technicians. 

Chemical Technology 

CT 120 — Analysis of Variations. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 116. 

An introduction to the application of recognized data analysis to 
technical problems. Instruction is given in the graphic presentation of 
engineering data for maximum effect. Emphasis is placed on determi- 
nation of data variance and comparison of two or more groups of 
data for significant differences. 

CT 121 — Experimental Design. I 3-0-3 I . Prerequisite: CT 120 
Advanced statistical work, including problems in the determina- 



74 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

don <>f th<* proper procedure to be followed in gaining maximum in- 
formation from given data. A stud\ of experimental methods designed 
to produce adequate result data at minimum expenditure of time and 
monej . 

CT 140— Pulping (4%-0-4%). Prerequisite: Chemistn 11-12. 

A brief summary of all commercial pulping processes in use. in- 
cluding a study of wood species, chemicals used, cooking conditions, 
characteristics of pulp, and recovery processes. Also included is a 
thorough study of pulping processes now in widespread use in the 
South, with emphasis on the sulphate pulping of pine. 

CT 141— Paper Machinery (4i L >-()-4V> I . Prerequisite: CT 140. 

The study of the function and operation of the various machines 
used for the conversion of pulp to the finished product, including the 
component parts and associated equipment of the fourdrinier machine. 
A survey of the leading types of machines used in the further process- 
ing of paper and paperboard for the production of bags, boxes and 
similar end products. 

CT 142— Paper Testing 1 1-4-3 I. Prerequisite: CT 141. 

A study of the physical properties of paper and paperboard. with 
emphasis on the characteristics commonly tested. Details of the con- 
struction, principle and operation of testing equipment are studied. 

CT 143— Pulp Testing (1-4-3). Prerequisite: CT 140. 

A comprehensive review of standard mill and laboratory pulp 
testing equipment and procedures. The inter-relationships of different 
pulp properties are studied, together with the theoretical and practical 
considerations of permanganate number and other measures of the 
degree of pulping. 

CT 150 — Organic Chemistry l 5-0-5 I. Prerequisites: Mathematir- 
117 and Chemistry 25b. 

A classroom survey of the types of organic compounds, their 
names and structures, preparation, properties and reactions, including 
electronic mechanisms involved in the reactions. 

CT 151 — Industrial Chemical Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 25b. 

The application of chemical principles to industrial processes of 
water treatment, paper manufacture, waste disposal, acid manufacture 
and various other related processes in the paper industry. 

CT 160 — Material and Energy Balances 1 I 2 1 O-0-2 1 , o I . Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 116. Chemistry 111. 112. Physics 114. 115. 116. 

A studv of the basic principles of phvsical chemistrv and the ap- 



COURSE DESC RIPTIONS 75 

plication of these principles in the solution of industrial problems. 
Much attcnton is given to the laws of thermodynamics and kinetic- and 
the integration of these laws into process design procedures. 

( / K)l Material and Energy Balances 11 (2%-0-2%). 
\ continuation of CT 160. 

CT 162 — Elementary Chemical Processes 1 (2-0-2). Prerequisites: 
Chemistx) 25b, CT 161. 

\ study of the transformation of energy and heat transfer, evapo- 
ration, distillation, drying, and flow of fluids. 

CT 163 — Elementary Chemical Processes 11 (2-0-2). 
A continuation of CT 162. 

CT 164 — Woodstructure and Properties (3-2-4). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 111. 112. Physics 114, 115, 116. 

A course covering the basic process of the formation of wood 
fibers in the living plant and the changes which occur during and after 
the life of the plant. A resume of physical and chemical characteristics 
of southern woods, and the means by which these characteristics may 
be controlled or altered. 

Industrial Technology 

IT 120 — Manufacturing Processes (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 116, Physics 114. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
tools and basic manufacturing operations. 

IT 121 — Production Organization (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 121-124. and IT 120 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in planning for production budgeting, plant location, ma- 
chinery and equipment selection, building and service selection, main- 
tenance planning, plant layout, materials handling, storekeeping plan- 
ning, personnel organization, employee selection and training. 

IT 122 — Economic Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Business Ad- 
ministration 124 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in economic, financial and intangible analysis. A study 
is made of the technique of making a decision among alternatives on 
the basis of comparative cost and suitability. A study of quality con- 
trol methods is included. 

IT 123 — Production and Cost Control (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Busi- 
ness Administration 124 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 



76 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Problems in factor) operation, including scheduling, planning and 
detailed control of production, as well as the analysis and control of 
COStfl of manufacturing. 

IT 124— Time and Motion Study (3-0-3). Prerequisites: IT 121 or 

approval of the instructor. 

The stud\ of working procedures to determine the best method, 
the best human motions and the time standard or measure of human 
efficiency . 

IT 125 — Mechanical Methods (0-4-2). Prerequisites: Engineering 
113. Mathematics 117. IT 124 and Physics 112. 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
mechanisms and jig and fixture design, including actual designing of 
simple machines, jigs and fixtures. 

IT 126 — Advanced Time and Motion Study (3-0-31. Prerequisite: 
IT 124 or approval of the instructor. 

A continuation of IT 124 designed for students specializing in this 
field. 

IT 127 — Data Presentation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: IT 124 or ap- 
proval of the instructor. 

Problems in graphical and numerical analysis of data. Problems 
in presenting data in the most efficient and least costly form in terms 
of time required for use. Simple graphs and charts, alignment charts, 
families of curves and multi-variable charts. 

Building Construction Technology 

BCT 121- -Graphics (3-9-6). Prerequisite: Engineering 111. An 
introductory study in architectural drawing and the principles of visual 
design. This subject equips the student with a basic knowledge of 
drawing sections, plans, perspective and presentation drawing in ink. 

BCT 141— Blueprint Reading (3-0-3). 

A study of architectural blueprints for students who must trans- 
late drawing into actual existing structures. This course is also useful 
for students interested in general layout of electrical, plumbing, heating 
or air-conditioning systems. 

BCT 142— Building Materials (3-0-3). 

A subject designed to familiarize the student with the physical 
properties of the materials generally used in the erection of structures, 
with brief descriptions of their manufacture. 

* These course- will l>e conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation 
plant by company personnel. 



CO! RSE DESCRIPTIONS 77 



BCT 211 — Wood and Sire! Construction (3-6-5). Prerequisite: 
Civ. T in. 

A study of the design of beams, girders and columns in both wood 
and steel. Included is a stud) <>f the various timber fasteners, steel 
and timber trusses and steel frameworks. 

BCT 212 — Concrete Construction I 3-6-5 » . Prerequisite: Civ. T L43. 

\ -tudv of the properties of reinforced concrete with the determi- 
nation of direct stresses and bending stresses in beams, slabs, girders 
and columns. Laboratory work consists of problems and the actual 
testing of various concrete members. 

BCT 222— Building Design 1 (3-12-71. Prerequisites: BCT 121 
and BCT 142. 

Residential design. This subject requires of each student a com- 
plete presentation drawing, a complete set of working drawings and 
a complete set of specifications for a dwelling house. Scale models 
will be built from working drawings by groups of students. 

BCT 223— Building Design 11 (3-9-6). Prerequisites: BCT 222 
and BCT 211. 

Architectural design, working and structural drawings of more 
complex structures than those studied in BCT 222. Structural com- 
putations are required. 

BCT 224— Building Design 111 (3-9-6). Prerequisite: BCT 223. 

A continuation of BCT 223. 

BCT 243 — Building Equipment (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Physics 116. 

A brief survey of the principles of heating, ventilating, plumbing, 
air-conditioning, lighting and electric wiring of buildings from the 
construction point of view. 

BCT 244— Cos/s and Estimates (3-3-4). Prerequisite: BCT 142. 

Preparation of material and labor quantity surveys from actual 
working drawing and specifications. 

BCT 231— Architectural History (3-0-31. 

A study of the progress of architecture. The material covered 
by this subject includes a review of architectural forms from early 
Egyptian to Modern Engineered Architecture. 

Civil Technology 

Civ. T 121 — Elementary Surveying (3-9-6). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 117 or concurrently. 



78 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Construction, care and use of surveying instruments; theory and 
practice of chaining; differential and profile leveling; transversing; 
computation of areas and earthwork; theory and practice of stadia 
and its application to topographic surveying; U. S. Gov't, system of 
public land surveys; reduction and plotting of field notes; the inter- 
pretation and plotting of field notes of topographic surveys. 

Civ. T 122 — Route Surveying (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Reconnaissance, preliminary location and construction surveys 
for routes of all kinds, including simple, compound and reverse curves 
used on highways and railroads; superelevation of curves; computations 
of earthwork: construction of quantity, mass and haul diagrams. For 
a final project each laboratory group must lay out a complete highwa\ 
location with each student submitting a complete set of plans, profiles, 
cross sections and earthwork computations for this location. 

Civ. T 131 — Highway Construction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
122. 

A study of highway location, grading, drainage, surfacing, mainten- 
ance and administration. 

Civ. T 212 — Structural Drafting 1 (0-6-2). Prerequisite: Engineer- 
ing 111. 

Structural steel framing practices and preparation of shop drawina 
for steel fabrication. 

Civ. T 213— Structural Drafting 11 (0-6-2). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
212. 

Preparation of detail drawings for concrete structures. 

Civ. T 223 — Land Surveys (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory and practice of land surveying: sub-divisions; filing and 
recording deeds; U. S. system of land subdivisions. U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic plane coordinate systems; county and state laws: compu'a- 
tions on astronomical observations for azimuth determination. Georgia 
Land Lot system of land subdivision. 

Civ. T 143 — Mechanics of Materials (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Phy- 
sics 114 and Mathematics 117. 

A study of coplanar forces and force systems, truss solutions, force 
systems in space, friction and centroids; direct stress, properties of ma- 
terials, riveted and welded joints, torsions, stresses in beams, beam de- 
flection, and columns. 

Civ. T 224 — Topographic and Contour Surveying 1 2-6-4) Pre- 
requisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory, description and use of advanced surveying instruments 



cm i«sk i)i:scKii'i io\> 79 

and methods; practice «»f state and Leal coordinate systems for cadastra 
surveys and construction work; field work for the design and con 
struction of engineering projects; use <>f t lie Plane Table on topographs 
surveys; theory, description and purposes «»f the man) types of maps 
plans and profiles used l>\ engineers; hydrographic surveying; alti 
merry. 

Civ. T 232 — Heavy Construction (3-3-4). Prerequisite: BCT 142. 

Hea\ \ construction practices. This subject acquaints the student 
with the many common pieces of heavy construction equipment and 
apparatus: operation, use. limitations and maintenance of this equip- 
ment are covered along with the methods, organization and manage- 
ment for both large and small jobs. Field trips are made to construction 
projects to illustrate the usage of various pieces of equipment. 

Civ. 7 241 — Hydraulics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Phvsics 114 and 
Civ. T 143. 

Elementary principles of hydraulics with special emphasis on 
static pressure, flow through pipes, channels and over wires. 

Civ. T 242 — Water and Sewage Plant Operation (3-0-3). Pre- 
requisite: Civ. T 241 or concurrently. 

A study of operation of water and sewage treatment plants and 
the tests made in these plants. 

Civ. T 251 — Photogrammetry (0-6-2). Prerequisites: Civ. T 121 
and Civ. T 224. 

The preparation of maps and charts from aerial photographs by 
Stereoscopic and ground surveying methods. Specifications and re- 
quirements for aerial surveys. 

Electrical Technology 

Electronics and Communications Technology 

Elec. T 121 — A-C Current Circuits (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Math- 
matics 116, Physics 115. 

Fundamentals of alternating current theory and practice as ap- 
plied to single-phase circuits. Properties of resistance, inductance and 
capacitance. Resistance networks. Generation of alternating emf's and 
elementary wave-shape analysis. Reactance, impedance and phase re- 
lations in series and parallel circuits. Resonant circuits. Complex 
notation, vector analysis and use of the slide rule. 

Elec. T 122 — A-C Current Circuits (5-3-6) .Prerequisites: Elec. T 
121, Mathematics 117. 



80 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Advanced a-c theor) and practice as applied to single-phase cir- 
cuits. Further analysis of series and parallel circuits using complex 
notation and vector analysis. Admittance, conductance, and suscep- 
tance. Anti-resonant circuits. Coupled-circuit theory, impedance trans- 
formation, transformer theory, mutual inductance and reflected im- 
pedance. Construction, classification, regulation, loss determination 
and efficient) of single-phase transformers. 

Elec. T 131 — Basis Electronics (5-3-6). Prerequisite: Elec. T 121. 

Basic study of the control of free electrons in elementary electronic 
circuits. Electron emission, classification and characteristics of high- 
vacuum tubes, tube characteristics curves. Rectification, amplification, 
amplification factor, trans-conductance plate resistance, load lines, stage 
gain and basic amplifier circuits. Types of bias. Classification and char- 
acteristics of gas-filled, vapor-filled, and cathode ray tubes. Hard-tube 
and soft-tube voltage regulator circuits. Conversion efficiency, ripple fac- 
tor and circuit analysis of single-phase, half-wave, full-wave and bridge 
rectifier circuits. 

Elec. T 223 — Alternating-Current Circuits 111 (3-3-4). Pre- 
requisites: Elec. T 122 and Mathematics 120. 

Study of polyphase circuits, balanced and unbalanced, including 
circuit analysis, distribution systems, transformers and transformer 
connections, rectifier circuits and instrumentation. 

Elec. T 232 — Industrial Electronics (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 122. Mathematics 120. Elec. T 131. 

Study of basic industrial electronic circuits and application of these 
circuits to such devices as electronic timers, voltage regulators, electro- 
static air cleaners, motor and generator control systems, photo-electric 
systems, web and register control systems, and induction and dia- 
electric heating equipment. 

Elec. T 233 — Advanced Electronics (3-3-4). Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 261 or concurrently, Elec. T 232. 

Study of special electronic circuits, including special amplifier 
and oscillator circuits, non-sinusoidal wave generators, pulsing cir- 
cuits, clamping, advanced study of transients, transistor principles and 
circuitry and servo-mechanisms. 

Elec. T 241 — Communications Circuits 1 (5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 122. Elec. T 131. 

Stud) of the operating principles of telephone equipment and 
circuits. Local-batten and common batter) manual exchanges, step- 
By-Step and all rda\ automatic exchanges. Basic relay circuits for 
digital control. Matched transmission lines for audio frequencies, dis- 
tributed and lumped line constants, pads and attenuators, constant-k 



COIRSK DESCRIPTION^ HI 

and m-derived filters for low-pass, high-pass, band-pass and band- 
elimination. "Pi", "\ . and "1/ sections. 

Elec. I 242 — Communications Circuits 11 (5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 2(>1 oi concurrently. 

High-frequency transmission line concepts and practical applica- 
tions, impedence-matching concepts and methods, transmission-line 

circle diagram, propagation, standing waves, basic antenna theory. 
antennas for low -frequency and high-frequenc\ applications, and high- 
frequency measuring techniques. 

Elec. T 243 — Communications Circuits 111 (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 233 and Elec. T 242. 

Microwave techniques, theory and practice in pulse circuits, ultra- 
high-frequency amplifiers, transit-time effects, wave guides and cavity 
resonators, dynatrons, transitrons, klystrons and magnetrons. Prin- 
ciples of radar, types of scan, radar transmitting and receiving systems, 
synchronization, and specific study of ASC-1 and APS-3 radar systems. 

Elec. T 251 — Direct Current Machinery (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 122, Mathematics 120. 

Construction, characteristics, operation and control, and industrial 
applications of direct current motors and generators. Electrical and 
mechanical characteristics of the various standard forms of field and 
armature windings. 

Elec. T 252 — Alternating-Current Machinery (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T 223, Elec T 251. 

Construction, characteristics, operation and control, and indus- 
trial applications of polyphase induction and single-phase motors. 

Elec. T 253 — Alternating-Current Machinery (5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 252. 

Construction, characteristics, operation and control, and industrial 
applications and synchronous generators, synchronous motors and syn- 
chronous converters. 

Elec. T 254 — Electrical Machinery (2-3-3). Prerequisites: Elec. T 
223 or concurrently. 

Survey of electrical rotating machines, direct and alternating 
current. Construction, characteristics, operation and control and in- 
dustrial applications of d-c. single-phase, a-c and polvphase a-c motors 
and generators. 

Elec. T 261 — Communications Technology 1 (5-6-7). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 241, Elec. T 232. 

The study of voltage amplification as applied to radio-frequencv 



82 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

and audio-frequent \ circuits. Analysis of amplifier eireuits and coupling 
methods, radio-frequency tuning circuits, regeneration and generative 
circuits, decoupling networks and basic oscillator circuits. Construction. 
tuning, and alignment of superheterodyne receivers. 

Elec. T 262 — Communications Technology 11 (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ite: Elec. T 233. Elec. T 261. 

Advanced stud) of radio communication circuits. Amplitude- 
modulated transmitters, power amplifiers, phase inverters, push-all 
amplifiers and modulator circuits. Broadcast studio techniques, re- 
corders, and recording and control room equipment. 

Elec. T 263 — Television Technology (5-3-6). Prerequisite: Elec. 
T 233. Elec. T 262. 

Principles of frequency modulation, methods of modulation and 
demodulation. FM transmitter and receiver circuits. Federal Communi- 
cations Commission standards for television transmission. Camera and 
picture tubes, composite video signal, television receiver circuits, power 
supplies, video amplifiers, deflection circuits, alignment procedures, 
transmitters circuits and color television. 

Elec. T 211— Wiring Methods. (3-3-4). Prerequisite: Elec. T 252. 

Types of wiring and wiring methods used in buildings. Selection 
of wire sizes, fuses, circuit breakers, insulation, distribution systems, 
control circuits, and service entrances. Design and layout of electrical 
wiring systems for lighting, motors and control circuits in accordance 
with standard practice and the recommendations of the National Elec- 
trical Code. 

Elec. T 212— Illumination (2-3-3). Prerequisite: Elec. T 122. 

Illumination principles and practices. Modern illumination prin- 
ciples, calculation procedures, and equipment are coordinated in de- 
sign problems of complete fluorescent and incandescent lighting instal- 
lations. 

Elec. T 273 — Electric Power Distribution (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 253 or concurrent^. 

Generation, transmission and distribution of electric power. Load- 
center distribution, sub-station operation, system and line protection, 
circuit analvsis of distribution in lines, and electric utility practices. 



CO! RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



83 



University of Georgia Extension Courses 

The classes listed below are I niversit) of Georgia Extension 
courses. See under "Fees'" the extra charges t<> enroll in these classes. 



Business Administration and Economics 



Business Administration 
Business \dmini-tration 



E-311 
E-351 



Business Administration E-370 

Busin*-- Administration E-371 

Business Administration E-390 

Business Administration E-515 

Business Administration E-519 

Economics E-312 

Economics E-326 

Economics E-360 

Economics E-386 

Economics E-431 

Economics E-444 



Introductory Cost Accounting (5-0-5) 
Principles of 

Organization & Management I 5-0-5) 

Business Law. first (5-0-5) 

Business Law. second (5-0-5) 

Real Estate Principles (5-0-5) 

Income Tax Accounting (5-0-5) 

Tax Accounting (5-0-5) 

Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5) 

Money and Banking (5-0-5) 

Principles of Marketing (5-0-5) 

Labor Economics (5-0-5) 

Investments (5-0-5) 

Government and Business (5-0-5) 



Classics 



Classical Culture 
Classical Culture 



E-301 
E-302 



Greek Culture (5-0-5) 

Latin Culture (5-0-5) 



English 
English 
English 
English 



English 



E-303 English Literature to 1800 ( 5-0-5 > 

E-304 English Literature after 1800 < 5-0-5) 

E-343 Contemporary Drama (5-0-5) 

E-314a Children's Literature (5-0-5) 



Geography 



Geography 

E-101 World Human Geography (5-0-5) 



History 
Historv 



History 



E-351 American History to 1865 (5-0-5) 

E-352 American History since 1865 (5-0-5) 



* Economics 121 and 124 are prerequisites to all advanced courses in eco- 
nomics and business administration, except by special permission of the instructor. 



::i ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Health Education 

Health Education E-344 Problems in School 

Health Education (5-0-5) 



Mathematics 

Mathematics E-102 Mathematics of Finance (3-0-3) 



Music 

Music E-302 Methods of Teaching 

Public School Music (5-0-5) 

Music E-312 Public School Music 

For Elementary Grades (5-0-5) 



Physical Science 

Physical Ecience E-l Survey (5-0-5) 

Political Science 

Political Science E-l American Government (5-0-5) 



Psychology 

Psychology E-414 Psychology of Personnel (5-0-5) 

Psychology E-423 Abnormal' Psychology (5-0-5) 



Social Science 

Social Science E-4 Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5) 



Sociology 

Sociology E-315 The Field of Social Work (5-0-5) 

Sociology E-360 Contemporary Social Problems (5-0-5) 



Speech 

Speech E-8 Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5) 



INDEX 



Admission l>\ Examination 1") 

Admission to ("lass 26 

Admission to College 14-16 

Admission of Special Students I") 

Admission of Transient Students 16 

Admission of Veterans 16 

Administration 5 

Admission by Transfer (Advanced Standing) 15 

\d\ Lsement and Placement Tests 2 

Aims 13-14 

\rl. Course Descriptions 48-49 

Assemblies, Attendance at 28 

Associate Degree 14-30 

Athletics 21 

Attendance Regulations 27-28 

Audio-Visual Instruction 19 

Biology. Course Descriptions 49-50 

Building Construction Technology. Course Descriptions 76-77 

Building Construction Technology Program 45 

Business Administration. Course Descriptions 50-53 

Business Administration. Senior College Preparatory 31 

Business Administration. Terminal 37-38 

Business Administration, 1-Year Program 40 

Business Administration. 3-Year Programs: 

Accounting 37 

General 38 

Transportation 39 

Calendar— 1957-1958 3-4 

Certificate. Admission by 14-15 

Civil Technology, Course Descriptions 77-7 ( > 

Civil Technology Programs 46 

Chemical Technology, Course Descriptions 73-75 

Chemical Technology Programs 44 

Chemistry. Course Descriptions 53-54 

College Commission 5 

Commencement Exercises 16-17 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 54-56 

Commerce, Secretarial. Terminal 40 

Commerce. Stenographic 40 

Conduct 26 



INDEX ( Continued ) 



Core Curriculum .'-><> 

Counseling 16 

I lourse Load 25 

Course Descriptions 4!)-o2 

Course Numbers 18 

Curriculums: 

Senior College Preparatory Programs 31-37 

Technical Institute Programs 43-47 

Terminal Programs 37-47 

Dean's List ( See Honors ) 26-27 

Dismissal From College 215-29 

Dramatics (Masquers) 21 

Economics. Course Descriptions 56-58 

Education. Course Descriptions 58 

Electrical Technology. Course Descriptions 79-82 

Electrical Technology Program 46-47 

Electronics and Communications Technology 47 

Engineering. Senior College Preparatory 31 

Engineering. Course Descriptions 58-59 

English. Course Descriptions 59-60 

Evening College 22-24 

Examination. Admission by 15 

Extension Courses. University of Georgia 83-84 

Extension Courses Credit at the University of Georgia 24 

Faculty 5-11 

Fees .... 17-!;, 

Forestry. Senior College Preparatory 31-32 

French, Course Descriptions . 60-61 

General Information 13-24 

General Regulations 24-29 

Geography, Course Descriptions 61 

German. Course Descriptions 61 

Glee Club 21 

Grades 26 

Graduation, Requirements for 29 

Health. Course Descriptions 61-62 

rlistor) of the College 13 

lli>t<>r\. Course Descriptions 62 

Hodgson Hall 19 

Holidavs 3 



INDEX i Continued I 



Home Economics, Course Descriptions 62-63 

Home Economics, Senior College Preparatory 32 

Home Economics, Terminal 1 I 

lienor- 26-27 

Human Relations, Terminal 11-12 

Incomplete Grades, Makeup of 26 

Industrial Management 32 

Industrial Technology, Course Descriptions 73-76 

Industrial Technology Program 44-45 

Libera] Art-. Senior College Preparatory ... 32-33 

Liberal Arts. Terminal 42 

Liberal Arts. 3- Year Program 42 

Library 19 

Masquers 21 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 63-65 

Mathematics. Senior College Preparatory 33 

Medical Technologists. Savannah School of 43 

Medical Technology. Senior College Preparator\ 33 

Medical Technology. Terminal 42-43 

Music (See Glee Club) 21 

Music. Course Descriptions 65-66 

Night School (see Evening College) 22-24 

Nursing, 1-Year Program 43 

Organization of the College 13 

Orientation and Advisement 16 

Philosophy. Course Descriptions 66 

Physical Education Program 21 

Physical Education. Course Descriptions 66-67 

Physical Education. Senior College Preparatory 34 

Physical Examination 25 

Physical Science, Course Descriptions 67-6!> 

Physics. Course Descriptions 68-69 

Physics. Senior College Preparatorx 34 

Placement Service 20 

Placement Tests 25 

Political Science. Course Descriptions 70 

Pre-Dental. Senior College Preparatory 34-35 

Pre-Medical. Senior College Preparatorv 35 

Pre-Xursing. Senior College Preparatory 35 

Pre-Optometry. Senior College Preparatory 35-36 



IM)K\ (Continued 



Pre-Pharmacy, Senior College Preparatory 36 

Pre-Veterinary, Senior College Preparatory 36 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 69-72 

Publications 21 

Radio Work Shop i see Masquers) 21 

!u commendations 29 

Refunds 1!! 

Regulations — General 25-29 

Reports and Grades 26 

Requirements for Admission 14-16 

Requirements for Graduation 29 

Scholarships 19-20 

Secretarial. 2- Year Program 40 

Senior College Courses 23-24, 83-84 

Social Science. Contemporary Georgia 71 

Sociology. Course Descriptions 71-72 

Spanish. Course Descriptions 72 

Stenographic. 1-Year Program 40 

Student Activities 20-21 

Student Assistants 19 

Student Center 20 

Summer School Calendar 3-4 

Teaching. Senior College Preparatory 36-37 
Technical Institute. Course Descriptions: 

Building Construction 76-77 

Chemical 73-75 

Civil 77-79 

Electrical 79-82 

General 73 

Industrial 75-76 

1 1 < Imical Institute Programs 22-23. 43-47 

Television Workshop (see Masquers) 21 

Transfer. Admissroji *by ;. .'• '*'"'" - 15 

Transfer t<> Other Institutions 30 

transient Students \. > 16 

transportation, Terminal Program- 39 

I niversit) of Georgia, Extension Courses 24. 83-84 

Warren A. Candler School of Nursing 43 

\\ ithdrawal from College 2!! 

Withdrawal Schedule 18 



"~7 



1958 - 59 



BULLETIN ARMSTRONG 

COLLEGE 



SAVANNAH 



AT35 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 




195P-1959 



SI MMKK FALL WINTKK SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 



A City Supported Junior College 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 




imm 



Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XXIII NUMBER I 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR 1958-1959 
Evening College 

Summer Session, 1958 

FIRST TERM 

Registration Friday, June 6 

( lasses begin Monday, June 9 

Last day to register for credit Tuesday, June 10 

Mid-Term reports due Friday, June 27 

Holiday Friday, July 4 

Examinations Thursday, July 17 

SECOND TERM 

Registration Monday, July 21 

Classes begin Tuesday, July 22 

Last day to register for credit Wednesday, July 23 

Mid-term reports due Monday, August 11 

Examinations Friday, August 29 

FALL QUARTER, 1958 

Freshman testing Monday, September 15 

Sophomore counseling Tuesday, September 16 

Freshman orientation and registration Tues. thru Thurs., September 16-18 

Registration Friday, September 19 

Classes begin Monday, September 22 

Last day to register for credit Thursday, September 25 

Mid-term reports due Friday, October 24 

Pre-registration for winter quarter Monday thru Wednesday, November 17-19 

Thanksgiving holidays Thursday thru Sunday, November 27-30 

Examinations Monday thru Wednesday, December 8-10 

Homecoming: 

Basketball Game Saturday, December 13 

Reception and Dance Friday, December 26 

Christmas holidays Thursday, Dec. 11 thru Thursday, Jan. 1 

WINTER QUARTER, 1959 

Registration Friday and Monday, January 2-5 

Classes begin Tuesday, January 6 

Last day to register for credit Thursday, January 8 

Mid-term reports due Friday, February 6 

Pre-registration for spring quarter Monday thru Wednesday, February 23-25 

Examinations Wednesday thru Friday, March 11-13 

Spring holidays Saturday thru Tuesday, March 14-17 



SPRING QUARTER, 1959 

Registration Wednesday and Thursday, March 18-19 

Classea begin Friday, March 20 

Last day to register for credit Tuesday, March 24 

Holiday Friday, March 27 

Mid-term reports due Wednesday, April 22 

Pre-registration for summer and fall quarters Wed. thru Fri., May 6-8 

Examinations Mon. thru Wednesday, May 25-27 

Sophomore Beach Party Friday, May 29 

Graduation Tuesday, June 2 

Summer Session, 1959 

FIRST TERM 

Registration Friday, June 5 

Examinations Thursday, July 16 

SECOND TERM 

Registration Monday, July 20 

Examinations Friday, August 28 



Administration 

The College Commission 

Herschel V. Jenkins Chairman 

Dr. Irving Victor Vice-Chairman 

Jack E. Cay, Jr., Ex-Officio Victor B. Jenkins 

Dr. H. Y. Charbonnier Herbert L. Kayton 

William A. Early, Ex-Ojjicio W. Lee Mingledorff, Jr., Ex-Officio 

H. Lee Fulton, Jr., Ex-Officio John B. Miller, Ex-Officio 

Joseph H. Harrison Dr. Helen A. Sharpley 

President's Office 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S. President 

Marjorie A. Mosley, A.A Administrative Assistant and 

Secretary to the President 

Evening College Office 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Vice President 

Helen Meighen Secretary 

Business Office 

Jule C. Rossiter, A.A Secretary and Treasurer 

George N. Nichols Clerical Assistant 

Registrar's Office 

Jack H. Padgett, A.B., M.A Registrar 

Elizabeth 0. Hitt Assistant to the Registrar 

Minnie McG. Campbell Veterans Affairs Officer 

Julia Fraker Clerical Assistant 

Carol T. Bond Clerical Assistant 

Student Personnel Services 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A Coordinator 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., M.A Psychologist 

Technical Institute Program 

Mary H. Strong, A.B Coordinator 

Library 

Muriel B. McCall, A.B., M.A Librarian 

Ella N. Clancy Assistant to the Librarian 

*Ted Martin Assistant to the Librarian 

* Part-time 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Other Personnel 

Ruth Burns P.B.X. Operator 

Angela McBride P.B.X. Operator 

Elizabeth Pound Manager Student Center 

and Book Store 
Joe McNeely Supt. of Grounds and Buildings 

The Faculty 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B.. M.A.. Bavlor University: Graduate Study. 
Cambridge University 

Instructor in English 

*Avrs G. Barnes, B.S., University of Georgia 

Chemistry Laboratory Instructor 

W. Orson BeecheR, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia Instructor in History 

^Stephen P. Bond, B.S. in Architecture. Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Angel Del Busto, Artist's Diploma. Juilliard School of Music; Mus. 
D., Zoellner Conservatory. 

Instructor in Woodwind Instruments 

James Charbonnier, A.B.. M.S., Geneva College. Geneva University. 
Switzerland: B.D.. Drew University; A.M.. Yale University; Doctor 
of Letters, Geneva University 

Instructor in French, German and History 

William E. Coyle. A.B.. Emory University; M.A., Georgetown Uni- 
versity Instructor in History and Political Science 

Lamar W. Davis. B.S. and M.S.. University of South Carolina: Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Josephine Simmons Denmark, B.S., Georgia Teachers College: M.S. 
in Home Economics, University of Georgia 

Instructor in Home Economics 

John L. M. des Islets, Col. (Ret.), B.S.. l T nited States Military Acad- 
emy Instructor in Physics 

Rossiter C. Durfee, A.B. and M.A.. Stanford University 

Instructor in English and Director of the Masquers 

Hartley Eckerson, B.S. and M.S.. University of Tennessee 
Chemistry Laboratory Instructor 

*Theodore Hknkle. Julliard School of Music. Pupil of Leopold Auer 

Instructor in Violin 
* Part-time 



\I)MI\ISTI{\TI()N 



Rosa I*. HOPSON, A.B.. Middlebur) College: M.A.. I niversit) of Geor- 
gia; Certificate from tin- Sorbonne University, Paris, France 

Instructor in French nnd English 

Lutrecia Vdams Hunter. B.S. and M.A., Peabod) College 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Ted L. Hi NTER, B. \.. I niversit) of Florida, Gradate Study University 

of North Carolina 

Instructor in Sociology and Psychology 

ESSIE I). JENKINS, Ouensboro Business College. Kentucky 
Instructor in Typing 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.M., Converse College: A.B., University of 
Georgia: M.A.. Columbia University 

Instructor in French and English 

Elmo M. McCray, Jr.. B.S., and M.S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Lewis Hagood Owen, A.B., Duke University 
Instructor in Chemistry 

J. Harry Persse, B.F.A., University of Georgia: Master of Music, 
Florida State University 
Instructor in Music and Faculty Advisor for Student Publications 

Roy J. Sims, B.S., David Lipscomb College: M.S., University of Ten- 
nessee 
Instructor in Physical Education for Men and Basketball Coach 

Frank P. Sivik, B.S., Providence College: M.S., University of Massa- 
chusetts Instructor in Biology 

Robert I. Strozier, A.B. and Graduate Study, University of Georgia. 
Graduate Study. Florida State University 
Instructor in English 

*Perry Lee Stephens, B.S., United States Naval Academy; Graduate 
Study, Florida State Universit\ 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Nancy P. Summers, A.B.. Bowling Green College of Commerce 
Instructor in Commerce 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., Northwestern 
University: Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work. Western Reserve 
University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Louis A. Thompson, M.B.A. and LL.B.. University of Georgia: Cer- 
tified Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 
* Part time. 



8 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Wii.i.iwi L Tkwis. Col. (Ret.), B.S., I nited States Military Academy; 
LL.R.. George Washington School »»f Law 

Instructor in Physical Science and Engineering Drawing 

Dorothy Morris Wade, B.S., University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

William S. Winn, B.D. and A.B.. Emor) I Diversity; M. \.. University 
of North Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Armstrong Evening College Instructors 

Marian Anderson, B.A.. Texas State College for Women: M.A.. Co- 
lumbia University 

Instructor in English 

Wesley W. Apple, B.S.. Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Robert B. Blackmon, B.S.. Clemson College 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Erdman Bowe, A.B.. Randolph-Macon Woman's College: M.A.. Colum- 
bia University Instructor in Geography 

Martha M. Browne, B.A.. Winthrop College: Certificate in English. 
University of South Carolina 

Instructor in English 

Joseph Lindley Budreal, Jr., B.B.A.. Tulane University ; Dale Car- 
negie Institute of Public Speaking in New York City 
Instructor in Economics 

Bryant W. Canty. Jr.. A.B.. I Diversity of Georgia 

Instructor in Botany 
Julian L. Carter, B.B.A.. (Accounting) University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 

Glenn T. Carthron. Jr.. \. \.. Armstrong College of Savannah; B.B. \.. 
Emory University 

Instructor in Economics 

James CharbonnieR, A.B.. B.S.. Geneva College. Geneva University; 
B.D.. Drew I ni\ersit\: \.M.. Yale University: Doctor of Letters. 
Geneva I niversity. Switzerland 

Instructor in French. German and History 

Enid Cope, \.B.. University of Georgia 

Instructor in English 

HOWARD E. COTNER, B.S., George Williams College: M.A.. Social 
Work. Ohio Sate 1 Diversity 

Instructor in Sociology 



VDMINISTR \TI()\ 



Richard I.. Curtis, B.S., (Electrical Engineering) Iowa Slate College 

Instructor in Electrical and Elect ionic Technology 
\\ . Edward Dale, U.S.. (Chemistry) I niversit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Biology 

John L M. des Isli rs, Col. ilui.i. U.S. (Engineering) I . S. Military 

\< adcinx . 

Instructor in Physics 

Orlando \. Diaz, U.S.. and M. \.. Philips I niversit) 

Instructor in Spanish 

Clarence 0. Di Rant, U.S. (Electrical Engineering), Clemson College 

Instructor in Civil Technology 

Michael J. Gannam, B.A., University of Georgia; M.A.. University of 

North Carolina: LL.EL University of Georgia 
Instructor in Political Science 
Powell I), (mbbs, B.S.. University of Alabama 

Instructor in Business Administration 

LAWRENCE W. Hill, B.S.. Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Instructor in Economics 

Rosa B. Hopson. A.B., Middlebury College: M.A.. University of Geor- 
gia: Certificate from Sorbonne University 

Instructor in French and English 

\\ endell M. Houston. B.C.E.. Clemson College 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Virginia L. Hudson, B.S.. Georgia State College for Women: M.A.. 
Duke University Instructor in History 

WARREN Ray Jones, B.C.E.. Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Robert L. Krauser, B.A.. University of Louisville 
Instructor in English 

Irving A. Levy, B.A.. Dartmouth College 

Instructor in History 

William E. Lewis, B.S.C.E.. University of Mississippi: M.S.. Univer- 
sity of Mississippi 

Instructor in Civil Technology 

Edna Luke. B.S.. University of Georgia: M.A.. University of Georgia 

Instructor in Music 

John C. McCarthy. Jr.. B.B.A.. University of Miami: M.B.A.. Uni- 
versity of Georgia Instructor in Economics 

Eugene McCRACKEN, A. \.. Armstrong College of Savannah: B.A.. 
Mercer University ; L.L.B.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in English 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Albert R. Marks, Jr., B.S.. University of North Carolina: Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Accounting 

Don MARTIN, A. EL Manchester College: M. Sc. in Chemistry. Ohio 
State University Instructor in Chemistry 

W. A. Metz, A.B.. University of Southern California: M.A., University 
of Southern California 

Instructor in Psychology 

John Fleetwood Moore, Savannah Traffic Bureau 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic Management 
Joseph C. Muller, B.B.A.. University of Georgia 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Margaret A. Murphy, A.B.. University of Georgia: Advanced Study. 
Columbia University 

Instructor in Ceramics 

Penn M. Nixon, B.A.. Duke University 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic Management 

Laura M. Parker, B.S., Georgia Teachers College; M.A., University 

of Georgia Instructor in English 

Thomas Parker, Jr., A.B., Mercer University 
Instructor in Economics 

Roy A. Pfaffman, B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Mathematics 

William Rokoff, B.S.. New York University: Graduate Work: The 
College of New York City 

Instructor in Business Administration 

JAKE \. Saltamachia, B.S. (Electrical Engineering). Southwestern 
Louisiana Institute 

Instructor in Physics and Electrical Technology 

Lee B. Sayre, B.A.. The University of the South (Sewanee) 
Instructor in English 

Julia H. Smith, B.S. and M.A.. Florida State University. 

Instructor in Sociology and History 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S.. Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Mary E. Sutton, B.A.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Economics 

Loi is A. Thompson. M.B.A.. LL.B.. University of Georgia: Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 



\I)\II\ISTI{\TI()\ 11 



William L Travis, CoL (Ret), B.S., I nited States Military Vcadetny; 
L.L.B., George Washington University 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 
Carlos Tucker, Jit.. A.B.. Mercer I niversit) 
Instructor in Chemistry 

HaRRY B. Weinburgh, B.S., Michigan State College: M.S.. Michigan 
State I niversitx Instructor in Biology 

William S. Winn, B.D. and A.B.. Emory University; M.A.. University 
of North Carolina Instructor in Mathematics 

HARMON Ziegler, A. A.. Armstrong College of Savannah; A.B., Emory 
I niversit\ Instructor in Political Science 

Technical Institute Program Instructors for Courses 
Offered at the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation 

Ellis 0. Barnes, B. Ch. E., University of Louisville 

John C. Bowers, B.S. in Ch. E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 
in Ch. E.. Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

Everett J. Harriman, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of 
Maine; M.S. in Pulp and Paper Technology, University of Maine 

James C. McKee, Bachelor of Forestry, Stephen F. Austin College; 
Mastery of Forestry, Duke University 

Robert D. Mounts, B.S. in Chemistry, University of Hawaii; B. Ch. 
E., North Carolina State University 

Ernest Clifton, B.S. in Mech. E., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Frank N. Rhoad, B.S. in Chemistry. Wofford College; M.S. in Chem- 
istry, Vanderbilt University 

Calvin F. Schlessman, B.S. in Chem. Engineering, Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology 

David W. Reid, B.S. in Ch. E., North Carolina State University 

Sidney T. Nutting, B.S. in Industrial Engineering. Georgia Institute 
of Technology 

Robert J. Cummings, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering, University 
of Florida; Master of Science in Engineering, University of Florida 

James A. Henderson, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering, University 
of Florida 

George L. Brannen, B.S. in Industrial Engineering. Georgia Institute 
of Technology 

Creed H. Reagan, B.S. of Industrial Engineering, University of Ten- 
nessee 

C. Duncan Blake, B.S., Master of Forestry, Louisiana State University 

Herman R. Letchworth, Journeyman Machinist, methods and ma- 
chine design 



Genera] In formal ion 

History and Organization 

Armstrong College <>f Savannah was founded on Ma\ 27. 1935. 
I>\ the Ma\or and Aldermen of the Citj <>f Savannah to meet a long- 
tflt need tor a junior college. The firs! college building was the mag- 
nificent home of the late George I". Armstrong, a gift to the cit) from his 
widow and his daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong 
Building. i> an imposing structure of Italian Kennaissance architecture: 
inside, its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity; 
while outside it is one of the beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation, 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Program, classrooms and the 
Dancing Studio. Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, which contains the audi- 
torium and theater for the Armstrong College Masquers and class 
rooms: and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science lecture rooms and 
laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city: the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as ex- 
officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of Education, and the President of the Savannah Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community by giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student may complete one or more of the following specific 
objectives. 

1. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree; 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLID E OF SAVANNAH 

2. Finish two \ears of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, denistry, law, home economics, the 
ministry and other professions; 

3. (Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry; 

4. Complete two years of an engineering program which 
is transferable for credit to colleges of engineering.. 

5. Complete a two-year technical institute program. 

The college awards an associate degree to students completing an 
approved program. 

Admission to the College 

A student planning to enter Armstrong will obtain from the Regis- 
trar an "Application for Admission Form." The student will complete 
and return this form to the Registrar's office. Request the High School 
Principal, or the College Registrar (in the case of a transfer student), 
to send a transcript of credits io the Registrar's Office, Armstrong Col- 
lege of Savannah, Savannah, Georgia. 

The Registrar will notify the student that he has been admitted if 
he meets the minimum requirements for admission as listed below. 

Requirements for Admission 

Admission of Freshmen 

All entering freshman day students are required to take entrance 
examinations. Information concerning these examinations may be ob- 
tained from the Registrar's office or Student Personnel Services. 

In addition, each entering freshman student must meet one of the 
following requirements: 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong College of Savannah 
must be a graduate of an accredited high school with at least fifteen 
units of credit or the equivalent. 

No subject-matter units are prescribed. The high school program 
should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for begin- 
ning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to contribute to 
this end are English composition, literature, natural science, history 
and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. The right 
is reserved to reject any applicant whose high school program does 
not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms b\ an official of the high school 
and mailed directl) to the Office of the Registrar. This certificate he- 
roines the propert) of the college and cannot be returned to the appli- 
cant. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Two units in high school algebra and one in plane geometry are 

prerequisites for admission to the freshman class in engineering. 

2. \ student twent) years of age or over, who is not a graduate 
of an accredited high school, may take the General Educational Devel- 
opment tests (high school level I . These tests should he completed at 

least one week before registration. Additional information ma\ he se- 
cured from the Registrar's office. 

Admission of Transfer Students 

Credit will he allowed for work done in other institutions of prop- 
er rank and standing and in certain cases for training received in the 
Armed Services. Credit from other institutions will be accepted toward 
graduation to the extent that the student has a general average of "C" 
for all college work transferred. To receive a degree from Armstrong 
College of Savannah, a student must complete 30 quarter hours in 
residence earning a "C" average and. in addition, must satisfy the 
requirements of a particular course of study. Adults (students over 21) 
may receive credit for certain college work on the basis of the General 
Educational Development tests (college level). Transfer students who 
have not completed two quarters of freshman English will be required 
to take placement tests in English. 

Admission of Special Students 

Students who are interested in enrolling in courses for their in- 
trinsic value but who do not wish college credits may be enrolled as 
special students. Requirements pertaining to entrance examinations, 
physical examinations, and physical education do not apply to these 
students. 

Transient Students 

A student regularly enrolled in another college may register at 
Armstrong as a transient student with the permission of his dean or 
adviser. This permission should be obtained in writing prior to regis- 
tration. For such a student entrance requirements are waived. 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Development 
tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do college work. 
A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement ( VA Form No. 7-1993) is 
required of every veteran who attends this institution under Public- 
Law 550 ( Korean Bill ) . application for which may be completed at 
the Veterans Administration office in the Industrial Building. Savannah. 
Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificate from the Veterans 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Administration, t h< • -indent should contact the Armstrong College Vet- 
erans Office regarding processing of certificate and future monthl) 
reports. Ml veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 550 should 
be prepared t<> |>a\ tuition and fees at time of registration. 

Orientation and Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the student's 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when 
the difficult) is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the adviser is usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories, either because of greater inten- 
sity or critical developments, are referable to community agencies out- 
side the college if this is agreeable to the student and his parents or 
guardians. 

The academic advisement of students is distributed among the 
entire faculty so that each instructor carries the responsibility for a 
proportionate number of the entire student body registered in the day 
program. Advisement interviews are scheduled with each student 
at least once a quarter and appointments for these interviews are mailed 
from the office of the Registrar. These interviews are designed to aid 
the student in planning his program of work in college. 

Student Personnel Services 

In the fall of 1957 the office of Student Personnel Services was 
added to the advisement program discussed above. The services avail- 
able are as follows: individual diagnostic tests for students of high 
abilit) and low performance; vocational aptitude tests on an individual 
basis: and short-time counseling with students whose difficulties in 
adjusting to college life, either academic or social, require help be- 
yond that which ma) be given In advisors and instructors. 

Student Personnel Services also attempts to help the student to 
choose a senior college and to plan his program according to require- 
ments of the senior college. Information concerning scholarships may 
be obtained through this office. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this time 
an associate degree i> awarded to those students who have met the 
requirements for graduation, and recognition is given to those who qual- 
if\ for scholastic honors. The facult) and graduates participate in full 
academic dress. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

Fees 

Tuition will be charged as follows: 
For L2-18 quarter hours $65.00. 
i Armstrong College Courses Onl) I 

For each quarter hour less tlian 12 quarter hours >").(><) 
For each quarter hour in excess of L8 quarter hours — $5.60 

Persons desiring to attend courses without examination or credit 
ma\ register as an auditor. Fees for auditors are the same as those 
for students registered for credit. 

A registration fee of $1.00 per student per quarter will he charged 
for I Diversity of Georgia Extension Courses. 

Students will he allowed three days in which to complete registra- 
tion in each of the two Summer Terms. However, a late registration fee 
of $3.00 will be charged on the third day of registration. Five days will 
be allowed for completion of registration in the Fall. Winter and 
Spring Quarters, a late registration fee of S3. 00 being charged on the 
fourth day of registration and S4.00 on the fifth day of registration. 

An activity fee of S5.00 each quarter will be charged all day stu- 
dents who are registered for 10 quarter hours or more. This fee is 
not charged Evening College students unless they wish to participate in 
the regular activity program of the college. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee for 
materials and equipment. Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses 
will be required to pay a special fee. These fees are indicated in the 
description of courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to make 
up the announced test must be made within one week after the student 
returns to college. 

A fee of S2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of S5.00 for a make-up final examination and laboratory 
examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any one stu- 
dent for a final make-up examination and or final laboratory examina- 
tion in a given subject shall not exceed S5.00. All fees will be paid to 
the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final ex- 
aminations will not be charged are as follows: 

The student was absent ( 1 ) on official school business. 

I 2 I due to illness 

I 3 I because of a death in the family. 

(4) in observing religious holidays. 






18 



\KMSTKOV; COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



The stud< Mit's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must 1><- pr< ented to the instructor in writing. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made only upon written appli- 
cation for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students 
dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below : 



Withdrawal Schedule 



First Session 

Summer Ouarter 
1958 



Second Session 
Summer Quarter 
1958 



Fall Quarter 
1958 



Winter Quarter 
1959 



Spring Quarter 
1959 



Withdrawal Dates 
June 6. 9. 10 
June 11. 12 
June 13. 16. 17 
June 18. 19 
June 20 through July 17 

Julv 21. 22. 23 

Julv 24. 25 

July 28. 29. 30 

July 31. August 1 

Aug. 4 through Aug. 29 

Sept. 19. 22. 23. 24. 25 
Sept. 26. 29. 30. Oct. 1. 2 
October 3. 6. 7. 8, 9 
October 10. 13. 14, 15. 16 
Oct. 17 through Dec. 1^ 

Jan. 2. 5. 6. 7. 8 
Jan. 9. 12. 13. 14. 15 
Jan. 16. 19. 20. 21. 22 
Jan. 23. 26. 27. 28. 29 
Jan. 30 through March 13 

March 18. 19. 20. 23. 24 
March 25. 26. 27. 30. 31 
April 1. 2. 3. 6. 7 
April 8. 9. 10. 13. 14 
April 15 through May 27 



Amount Due To College 



o <» 



20^ o 

Hi'; ,, 
60^ o 

80^r O 

100' 

20^c o 
lir; o 
60^ o 

80^r O 
100^r 

20^ o 
40^c o 
60^ o 
80^- o 
100^r O 

20^r O 
40^r o 
60 r r O 
80^r O 
lOO^r o 

20^r o 
40^r 
60^r O 
80^r O 
100^r o 



gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

-r<>— registration fees 

gross registration fees 

nn>-- registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 

gross registration fees 



\ graduation fee of ST. 50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up. and will not 
be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until the de- 
linquent has been removed. 

Each student leaving \rmstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 
each. 



Lihrary 

The college librar\ of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson 
Hall on the corner of Whitaker and West Gaston Streets. AH the ma- 
terials are readily available to the students since all books are on open 
shelves. On the main floor is the reference room which contains ref- 



GENER \l. INFORM \TM>\ 19 

~ — ~ — ; 

erence books, non-fiction hooks, re-er\e desk and circulation de-k. 
Downstairs is anothei reading room, containing fiction, biography. 
hooks in foreign languages, current and hound volumes of periodicals, 

The workroom and the office of the Librarian are also downstairs. 

\t the present time the Library collection consists of 15.000 vol- 
umes as well as a large numher of pamphlets on subjects of current in- 
terest. More than one hundred periodicals are received, including five 
newspapers. Besides the books, periodicals and pamphlets, the library 
has a collection of recordings and a phonograph located in the down 
stairs reading room for the use of the students, faculty and staff. 

In addition to the resources of the college lihrar\ the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, also 
housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains an outstanding collection 
of materials on Georgia and its history as well as a large collection of 
materials on Southern history. The holdings of the Historical Society 
consist of more than ten thousand books, eighty periodical subscrip- 
tions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of the more com- 
plete files of Savannah newspapers, dating back to 1763. 

Audio Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, for- 
eign languages and music, visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is in- 
terested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application blanks may be secured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong Building. Those who wish to apply for scholarships for the 
school year beginning in September should file an application in the 
President's office not later than July 15. All applicants are required to 
appear before an oral interview board during the month of August. 
Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this interview. 

COMMISSION SCHOLARSHIPS— 7 are offered each year. Value: 
$100.00 each. I Both men and women are eligible). These are work 
scholarships. Students who hold them work a few hours each week 
as assistants in the library, laboratory or in the administrative offices 
of the college. In some instances, it is possible for a student to earn 
more than $100 a year. 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

ARTHl'R LI CAS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS— 5 are offered 
each \ear. Value: $100.00 each. (Both men and women are eligible!. 

Jl Moll CHAMBER OF COMMERCE— 2 are offered each year. 
Value: S2( )().()() each. I Both men and women are eligible I. One scholar- 
ship is awarded to a freshman and one to a sophomore. 

EDWARD McGUIRE GORDON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP— 
1 is offered each year. Value: $200.00. (Men only are eligible). Appli- 
cants must be residents of Chatham County. 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY— ENGINEERING— 1 is offered 
each year. Value: $100.00. (Men only are eligible). 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY— HOME ECONOMICS— 2 are of- 
fered each year. Value: $100.00 each. (Women only are eligible). 

THOMAS MAYHEW CUNNINGHAM MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP — 1 is offered each year. Value: $200.00. (Both men and women 
are eligible). 

HUNTER FIELD OFFICERS' WIVES' CLUB— 2 are offered each 
year. Value: $150.00 each. (Both men and women are eligible). 

PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION OF SAVANNAH— 1 is offered 
each year. Value: $100.00. (Women only are eligible). 

WARREN STEPHEN FIGG SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP— 1 is 

offered each year. Value: $200.00. (Men only are eligible). 

Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place 
his name on file with the Business Officee. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the da\ and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the book store. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 

The governing bod) for student affairs at Armstrong College is 
the Student Senate. This organization is made up of elected representa- 
tives from all student groups recognized l>\ the Senate. It is the function 
and responsibility of tin 1 Senate to coordinate, direct and control stu- 
dent organizations and activities at Armstrong. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 



:<>n. 



Athletics 

Armstrong participates on the inter-coliegiate level in basketball, 

ilf. and tennis. \ll other sports at the College arc mi an intramural 
basis. Intramural competition is offered in such sports ;i> basketball, 
volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, softball and ping-pong. Ml are 
encouraged to take part in this program. 

Physical Education Program 

All regular da\ students are required to participate in a physical 
education program. Courses are offered each quarter except during the 
summer. These are listed elsewhere in the catalog under "Course De- 
scriptions." See "General Regulations" for specific information con- 
cerning requirements of the program. 

Publications 

There are two student publications at Armstrong, the Inkwell, a 
newspaper, and the 'Geechee, the college annual. These afford the stu- 
dents an opportunity to express themselves through creative writing 
and art work, and to gain experience in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950. after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated form Armstrong College and was re- 
organized as the Little Theatre, Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in any 
phase of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up. costuming, 
and other production skills.. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio and Televi- 
sion Workshop, formed to offer interested students an opportunity to 
develop techniques of radio and television broadcasting. 

The Glee Cluh 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who enjoy sing- 
ing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from group singing. Besides 
two yearly concerts at the college, the Glee Club has produced musicals 
with the Armstrong Masquers and sung for many civic groups in Sa- 
vannah. 



22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE 

Fully accredited college classes are offered after 6:00 p.m.. Mon- 
da\ through Friday. Classes meet one. two or three evenings a week 
according to the amount of credit the course offers and its duration. 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non-credit 
ba-i>. 

It is possible to enroll for classes taught on Monday. Wednesday 
and Friday at 6:00. 7:30 or 9:00 p.m. Students employed during the da> 
are urged to limit their enrollment to one or two courses. Eighteen 
five-hour courses, or the equivalent, are required for graduation. A stu- 
dent planning to graduate, should complete a program of studv listed 
elsewhere in this Bulletin under "Curriculums." 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed elsewhere 
in this Bulletin are applicable. When a student is enrolled in more 
than one course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. Re- 
funds are made only in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc.. is covered under "Fees". Student activity 
fees are not assessed evening college students, unless they wish 
to participate in the regular activity program of the college. 

Armstrong Evening College, as successor of the Savannah Branch 
of the University of Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation in 
June 1951. Veterans are now attending under Public Laws 550 and 
894 (Korean Veterans). 

Qualified Armed Service personnel, currently on active duty, may 
have their tuition partially defrayed by the services. This is arranged 
through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of Evening College courses, instructors, 
etc., may be obtained by addressing requests to the Director. Armstrong 
Evening College, P. 0. Box 1913, Savannah. Georgia. 

The Technical Institute Programs 

Seven programs leading to the degree of Associate in Science are 
offered by the Armstrong Evening College. These are two year terminal 
programs which qualify the student as a technician in his chosen field. 
Curriculums are available in the following technologies: Building Con- 
struction. Civil, Electrical and Electronic. In addition three other pro- 
grams are offered in cooperation with the Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corporation in Chemical. Industrial and Mechanical technologies. In 
these three fields the basic courses are taught at Armstrong College by 
the college staff. The advanced technical courses are conducted at the 
plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation by fully qualified com- 
pain personnel. Excellent shop, laboratory and classroom facilities are 
available. These courses are fully accredited by Armstrong College and 
are not restricted t<> employees of the company. 



GENER AL INFORMATION 23 

Tuition for Technical Institute courses taught at Armstrong Col 
lege i> the same a> for other Evening College courses. Tuition for the 
courses conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper plant i> $1.00 per 
credit hour, payable to Armstrong College. 

Classes arc scheduled whenever possible with duplicate or extra ses- 
sions to accommodate shift workers with rotating work hours. 

Programs of stud) and course descriptions in the Technical Insti- 
be found elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Senior College Courses 

Through the Extension Division of the I niversit) of Georgia. Arm- 
strong Evening College offers upper-division courses which can be taken 
for credit, satisfying junior and senior requirements for the bachelor's 
degree. A minimum of one year of residence at the University is re- 
quired to receive the bachelor's degree. The equivalent of one year of 
senior college work may be completed through extension classes in the 
evening program at Armstrong College on certain degree programs. 

Instructors in the extension classes are approved by the heads of 
the departments at the University of Georgia. These courses then carry 
University credit and are recorded in the Registrar's office at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia. They are University of Georgia courses taught in 
Armstrong Evening College. I See photostat ) . The section under "Fees" 
explains special charges for University of Georgia Extension courses. 

In the past, the courses offered have been the core curriculum for 
the junior year leading toward the Bachelor of Business Administration 
degree; also, income tax accounting, a second course in business law T . 
personnel administration and other advanced courses in economics and 
business administration as requested. 

Junior and senior courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree 
are offered in English, literature, history, psychology and sociology. 
Other courses will be added if sufficient student requests warrant. 

Courses required to qualify for State Department Teacher's Certifi- 
cates are sometimes offered as extension classes. 

Students are limited to 90 quarter hours of residence credit at the 
junior college level. Another 45 quarter hours of credit may be obtained 
through senior college extension classes. 

Transcripts of credit granted for University of Georgia Extension 
courses must be obtained from the office of the Registrar. University 
of Georgia, Athens. Georgia — not from Armstrong College. In re- 
questing such transcripts, the student should indicate that the courses 
were taken at Armstrong College of Savannah through the Extension 
Division of the University of Georgia. 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The University of Georgia 

Office of the Registrar 

Athens, Geob6IA 

April 28, 195U 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

This is to advise that any student may use up to 
a maximum of hS quarter hours credit completed through 
correspondence and extension courses toward a degree 
at the University of Georgia. This may be taken over 
and above the first two years of work whether these 
be completed at a junior college or a senior college. 

Specifically, we will recognize without question 
up to hS quarter hours credit completed in extension 
courses offered in a joint program sponsored by 
Armstrong College of Savannah and the Division of 
General Extension at the University of Georgia. 



Cordially, 



Walter N. Danner 
WNDicc Registrar 



Genera] Regulations 

Advisement ami Placemenl Tests 

To help a studenl select a definite objective earl) in his college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman a 

series of interest and achiex einent tests. In the fall, these ace given dur- 
ing Freshman Week and are scored prior to the -Indent's interview with 
an adviser. On the basis of these objective measurements, the students's 
previous record, his interest and his famil) counsel, the student with the 
aid of his adviser decides on a program of stud) which will enable him 
tn accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examinations 

Each da) student must submit a completed physical examination 
report on the forms furnished by the college before he can complete his 
registration. On the basis of the examination, the physical education di- 
rector will adapt a program of training and recreation to individual re- 
quirements. This regulation is not applicable to students enrolled in the 
Evening College. 

Physical Education Program 

All regular day students who are candidates for diplomas or certif- 
icates are required to attain credit for six physical education courses, 
one each quarter. A student graduating in less than six quarters max re- 
duce the physical education requirements accordingly. Regular courses 
should be taken in proper sequence and two required courses should 
not be scheduled in any one quarter. 

A student who has served a minimum of three months in the 
military services shall be exempt from Physical Education 11. A stu- 
dent who has served a minimum of six months in the military services 
shall be exempt from Physical Education 11 and 12. Proof of service 
time shall be presented. 

In order for a regular day student to be excused from an) one 
physical education course, he must have his or her doctor sign a spe- 
cial form. A student who does not plan to graduate from Armstrong Col- 
lege will be allowed to register for any one quarter without physical ed- 
ucation providing he or she signs the proper form. No student may 
register without a required physical education course except with 
written permission from the Physical Education Department. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that the aver- 



26 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

age -Indent \\ ill devote approximately forty-eight huurs per week to his 
college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted onl) to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
ma) take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will he allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in am one quarter. 

No student will be allowed to take more than 11 quarter hours of 
work in the Evening College during the fall, winter and spring quarters 
unless he has better than a "B" average in the last quarter for which 
grades are available. A student will be limited to 6 quarter hours dur- 
ing any one term of the summer unless he has better than a "B" aver- 
age in the last quarter of work for which grades are available. All en- 
tering students and students with full-time employment are limited to 
11 quarter hours of work in the fall, winter and spring quarters: and 
to 6 quarter hours of work during any one term of the summer session. 
This regulation does not apply to transient students who are regularly 
enrolled in another institution. 



Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registra- 
tion and paid his fees in the Business Office. 



Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the use on the 
campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 



Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the administration and faculty that students in college 
should be held accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, report 
cards, warnings of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not 
senl out to parents or guardian- b\ the Registrar except on request. In- 
stead the students themselves receive these reports and are expected to 
contact their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report 
cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades are 
issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an ad- 
viser: in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are available to 
help an) student seeking assistance. 





Re 


ports arc based <>n tin 


\ plus 




Exceptional 


\ 






Excellent 


B 






Good 


C 






Fail 


1) 






Poor 


E 






Incomplete 


F 






Failure 


\\ 






\\ itlulreu 


W/F 






Withdrew Failin 



GENERAL REG1 LATIONS ±~ 

ie following system of grading: 

1 honor points pei quartei boui 
A honor point- per quarter hour 

2 honor point- per quartei houi 
1 honor point per quarter houi 

No honor point- per quarter hour 
Incomplete musl !><• removed before 
mid term of the following quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course musl be repeated 
Course must be repeated 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade I should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the middle of the 
succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". An "E" grade be- 
comes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

A student who receives an "E" grade in the Evening College will 
have one >ear in which to complete the requirements of the course. If 
the *"E* grade is not removed within this time, it automatically becomes 
an "F". An "E" grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load I not less than fifteen hours per quarter), and 
achieving an average grade of "B" or better with no grade below that 
of "C" will be placed on the Permanent Dean's list. This list is published 
each June in the commencement program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Deans 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points per 
quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude (with 
highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with distinction) will 
be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements with an aver- 
age of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be selected by the graduating class from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work completed 
before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a grade of "B* or better 
in each course during any quarter will be placed on the Deans Schol- 
astic Attainment List. 

Students in the Evening College enrolled for ten or more hours, 
who earn 15 consecutive quarter hours of credit with grades of "B" or 
better in each course will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment 
List. 



28 ARMSTRONG CO LLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Attendance 

Student- arc expected to attend class* - as scheduled \n\ absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A daj student who has been absent from class for a valid reason 
should have the absence excused with a written statement to his instruc- 
tor who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the Regis- 
trars office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from the 
date the student returns to school: otherwise the absence will not be 
excused. Evening College students must leave excuses for absence in 
the Evening College office on a special form provided for that purpose. 

An Evening College student whose absences for any cause exceed 
one third of the number of times the class meets in the quarter will be 
dropped from the class. The student will be given a "W" if at the time 
he was dropped he had a passing grade: if at the time he was dropped 
he was failing, he will be given a * 4 WF". 

The above regulation is waived only in those cases in which 
the instructor and the registrar concur. 

A day student who has unexcused absences equal in number to 
the times the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused 
absence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the 
Registrar's office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's 
office will notify the student. Grades assigned to those who have been 
dropped will be either \^ or W F. A student who is dropped within 
three weeks after the beginning of the quarter will automatically re- 
ceive a grade of W. A student who is dropped after the 3rd week of the 
quarter will receive either a W or a W F depending upon his status at 
time the student withdraws or is dropped from class. 

Students will be charged with absences incurred b\ late registra- 
tion in the college as indicated in the current bulletin and these ab- 
sences carr\ the same penalty as the other absences from a course. 
Attendance at monthh assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing. i- a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. \n\ student planning to w ithdraw should immediately make 
such intentions known to the administration of the college in writing. 
This notice is required to receive an) authorized refunds. 

\ -Indent should formally withdraw from am class which he dis- 
continue- b\ securing the written approval of the instructor and his 
faculty adviser. This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's 
office. Grades assigned to those who withdraw will be either \\ or \\ F. 
\ student who withdraw- within three week- after the beginning of 



GENERAL REG1 LATIONS 29 

tln> quarter will automatically receive a grade <>f \\ . A. student who with 
draws after the 3rd week of tin- quarter will receive either a W <»i \\ I 
depending upon hi> status at the time the studenl withdraws <»r i- 



<lroi>i>c( 



ppe 



I from (la- 



Dismissal 



\n\ <la\ studenl failing (excepl in cases excused before examina- 
tions on accounl of illness i to pa— at leasl one course other than phys- 
ical education in an\ one quarter will he dropped from the rolls of the 
college. \n\ student who fails to make an average of at least 0.6 honor 
points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the first three 
quarters work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. With- 
drawal is recommended to all students who have less than a "C" aver- 
age at the end of the fourth quarter. At the end of the sixth quarter's 
work a student must have an 0.8 honor point per quarter hour average 
in order to re-register. 

\n\ student in the evening program seeking credit who fails (ex- 
cept when excused before final examination on account of illness) to 
pass at least one course in two consecutive quarters will be dropped 
from the rolls of the college. Any student in the evening program who 
fails to make an average of at least 0.6 honor points per quarter hour in 
the first 50 quarter hours of work at the college will not be allowed to 
re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students who have less 
than a "C" average at the end of 70 quarter hours of work. At the 
end of 90 quarter hours of work, a student must have an average of 0.8 
honor points per quarter hour in order to re-register. 

Students who have been asked to withdraw on account of academic 
deficiency will be re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes to an- 
other college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If a student 
does not go to another college or to Armstrong Evening College he may 
re-register in the day school at Armstrong after two quarters. He re- 
enters on probation for one quarter, during which quarter he must 
make a "C" average. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are listed below : 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed else- 
where in the catalog under "Curriculums" with an average 
grade of "C." Any exceptions to a program may be re- 
ferred by a student's adviser to the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standing. 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation will be 
completed at Armstrong College of Savannah. 



30 ARMSTRONG C OL LEGE OF SAVANNA H 

3. V>t more than one-fourth of the total work required for 
graduation will consisl of correspondence courses and 
credit for training in the Armed Services. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar's 
office two quarter- prior to the expected date of graduation. 



Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent rec- 
ords are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and other 
agencies having access to confidential records. A good college record is 
of vital importance to a student. 



Curricu lu ms 

General 

Before registration, (I..- student should PLAN \ PROGRAM OF 
ST1 m WITH \\ ADVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 
an- required for graduation, he should have on record in the office of 
hi-* adviser a cop) of his program. In order for a -indent to make an\ 
changes in his planned program he musl consult Ids adviser. The ad- 
\ iser and the Registrar will cheek a student's program and it will he 
approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

\n associate degree is conferred upon all students who successfull) 
complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the two-year pro- 
grams or the three-year course in business administration. 

If a student plans to transfer to another institution either hefore 
or after graduation, it is essential that he determine what courses must 
be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree re- 
quirement of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 

The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding 
of one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings, right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 14 r 15 *(114, 115) ; History. 14. 15 ( 114. 
115) : ten quarter hours of natural sciences**, and Physical Education 
11. 12. 13. With permission of instructor, students may substitute Physi- 
cal Education 14 for Physical Education 12 and Physical Education 23 
for Physical Education 13. 

Students enrolled in one year programs may choose any three of 
the required physical education courses as listed for freshmen and 
sophomores. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of physi- 
cal education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses described 
below may substitute English 28 for one of the required English 
courses. 

A student may choose any three of the following phvsical educa- 
tion courses: 21. 23. 25. 26. 27. 28, 31. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 

* Courses numbered over 100 are offered by the Evening College. 
** Natural sciences include biology, chemistry, physics, human biology, and 
physical science. 



32 



akmstkom; college of savannah 



skmoh collkgk PREPARATORY pr<m;ra.ms 



(1) Business Administration 
First Year 



English 1 1. 15 Freshman English 10 
Histon 1 I- 15 Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 

Mathematics 19 — Finance 5 

Electives 5 



Second Year 



English 21, 22 Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 
Business Administration 24, 25 — 

Accounting 10 
Economics 21. 24 — Principles and 

Problems 10 

Political Science 13— Gov't of U.S. 5 

Electives 10 



TOTA1 48 



TOTA1 48 



( 2 ) Engineering 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The student should obtain a catalog from the senior college 
he plans to attend and check this program against the requirements. The 
courses required for the freshman year have been worked out in con- 
sultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 

First Year Second Year 



English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

History 14. 15 10** 

Physical Education 3 

Mathematics 21. 22. 23— 

Calculus 15 

Physics 21. 22. 23 18 

Political Science 13 5** 



TOTAL 56 



English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13. . . 3 

Chemistry 11, 12— General 10 

Mathematics 16. 17, 20 — College 

Algebra, Trigonometry and 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 15 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative Analysis 5 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 6 
Engineering 19 — Descriptive 

GeometJ j 3 

TOTAL 52 

(3) Forestry 

A one-year program for students in Forestry. The student should 
obtain a catalog from the senior college he plans to attend and check 
ilii- program against the requirements. 

English 1 1. 15 Freshman 

Physical Education 11. 12. 
Biology 11. 12 — Botain 

Economics 21 Principle- 

Engineering 11— Drawing 

Mathematics 16. 17 College Muchra and Trigonometry 
Physics 1 1 or Physical Science 11 



13 



\ student should consull 
required subjects. ( !oll< g< 



the catalog of his prospective senior college for 
• differ as Jo what subjects are required for this 



course. 
* 3 quarters oJ a foreign language maj be taken in lieu of the social sciences. 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



33 



Political Science 13 Government of I. S. 
TOTAL 



(-!•) Home Economic§ 

First Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 
Historj 14, 15— History of Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

\rt 11 Creative \rt 5 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation: 

Careers & Personal Development 5 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing . 5 

Laboratory Science 10 



Second Year 

English 21-22 — Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 12 Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 5 
Home Economics 21 — Home 

Planning and Decorating 5 
Home Economics 24 — Famik 

Fundamentals 5 

Social Studies 10 

Electives 5 

* Mathematics 9 or 16 5 



TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

(5) Industrial Management 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. 

Second Year 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 



First Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

History 14 — Western Civilization 5 

Chemistry 11, 12 — General 10 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative Analysis 5 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 6 
Engineering 19— Descriptive 

Geometry 3 

Mathematics 16, 17, 20— College 
Algebra. Trigonometry and 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 15 



Physical Education 

History 15 — Western Civilization 

Business Administration 24. 25 

Principles of Accounting 
Economics 21. 24 — Principles and 

Problems 

Mathematics 19 — Mathematics of 

Finance 



Physics 14. 15, 16 — General Physic> -15 
TOTAL 58 



TOTAL 57 

(6) Liberal Arts 

This program is recommended for candidates for the A. B. degree, 
pre-education. pre-law. pre-ministerial. journalism, and other pre-pro- 
fessional concentrations. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14, 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 



Second Year 

English 21. 22— Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

** Science 10 



* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as stated 
on page 65. 

** A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not 
require the amount indicated of this subject may, with the approval of his adviser, 
substitute other courses required by the senior institution during his f ir^t two 
years. 



34 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics W> College Ugebra.. 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry .... 5 

I- oreien Language 10 



TOTAL 



53 



Two of the following courses 10 

History 2.5 — Recent European 
Political Science 13 — Govt, of U.S. 
Psychology 21a -Introductory 

Nu iology 20a — Introductory 
Economics 21 — Principles 
Philosophy 10 — Introductory 

Electi\«- 10 

TOTAL 43 



( 7 ) Mathematics 

A course designed for those students who wish to major in math- 
ematics. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14. 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra. . 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry . . 5 
Mathematics 20 — Analytic Geometry 

and Calculus 5 



Second Year 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 

Phvsical Education 3 

Phvsics 14. 15. 16 

21, 22, 23 10 

Electives 25 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 48 



(8) Medical Technology 

This program is designed for those students who wish to obtain 
their first two years toward a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 
Technology. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14, 15 — History of Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Kiolonx 14. 15 10 

Chemistry 11. 12 10 

Mathematics 16 5 



Second Year 

English 21. 22 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology 23 6 

Chemistry 13 5 

Electives 12 

French or German 10 

Mathematics 17 5 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 



5] 



(38) Music 

English 1 \. 15 Freshman English 
Historj 11- 15 Western Civilization 

Physical Education 

Applied Music 



* A Btudenl applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of ilii- subject ma>. with tin 1 approval of his adviser, sub- 
stitute other courses required by the senior institution during his first two years. 






SENIOR COLLEGE PREPAB \T()in PROGR VMS 



35 



Music 1 1 Music Theorj 
Music li.' Music Theor) 
Electives 

TOTAL 

(9) Physical Education 

First Year 

English 11. 15 Freshman English. 10 

lli-ti>!\ II. 1") Western Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Biologj 14, 15 10 

Horn.' Economics In — Nutrition 4 

* Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

** Electives 6 



TOTAL 



18 



10 
49 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology 18, 19 — taatonrj and 

Physiology 10 

Physical Education 23 — Senior 

Life Saving and Swimming 2 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating 

of Basketball 2 

Psychology 21a — Introductory 5 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 5 

Sociology 21 — Marriage & the 

Family 5 

:: ::: Electives 6 

TOTAL 48 



(10) Physics 

A course designed for those students who wish to major in Physics. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
Historv 14, 15 — Western Civilization 10 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Chemistry or Biology 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 
Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry ... 5 
Mathematics 20 — Analytic Geometry 
and Calculus 5 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Mathematics 21, 22, 23— Calculus 15 

Physics 21, 22, 23 18 

tElectives 10 



TOTAL 56 



(11) Pre-Dental 

This program is designed for those students who wish to pre- 
pare themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three or 
more years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded 
upon successful completion of the academic program described below. 

t Electives should include a foreign language, preferably German. 

* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
stated on page 65. 

::::: It is recommended that English 28 and Physical Education 20 be taken as 
elective courses. 

*** The student is exempt from this course provided he has a Red Cross 
Senior Life Saving Certificate. 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



First Year Second Year 

English U. 15 Freshman English 10 English 21 22 10 

History 11. 1") Western Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 . . 3 Biology 23 6 

Biology 14, 15 10 Chemistry 13 5 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 French or German 10 

Mathematics 16 5 Mathematics 17 5 

Elective? 12 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 51 

(12) Pre-Medieal 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of medicine after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon 
completion of the academic program described below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15— Freshman English 10 English 21 22 10 

History 14, 15 — Weste.n Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 Biology 23 6 

Biology 14, 15 10 Chemistry 13 5 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 Fiench or Grrman 10 

Mathematics 16 5 Mathematics 17 5 

Electives 12 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 51 

(13) Pre-Nursing 

This is a one-year program for thos^ students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offering a B.S. in Nursing. 

English 14. 15 10 

Hi>tory 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11 5 

Mathematics 16 5 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 5 

\n\ three of tin- following: 
English 28 
Political Science 13 
Psychology 21a 
Sociology 20a 15 

TOTA1 50 

( 14) Pre-Optometry 

The requirements for adm'ssion to the schools and colleges of op- 
tometry in the I nit' (I States are relative]) uniform but are not identical. 
The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards of Ex- 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 37 



aminera in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare a Btu« 
dent for transfer t<> anj school <>r college of optometry in the I nited 

States and Canada . 

First Year Second Year 

English 11. 15— Freshman English 10 English 21, 22 Sophomore English 10 

History 11. 15 Western Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11, 12. L3 3 Biolog) 23 . 6 

Biologj 14, 15 10 Mathematics 20 5 

Chemistr} 11, 12 10 Sociolog) and Psychology .10 

Mathematics L6, 17 10 Electives 12 

TOTAL 53 TOTAL 46 

(15) Pre-Phar in aoy 

This is a one-year concentration for those students who wish to 
obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy The regional schools of pharmac) require three \ears minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

English 14. 15— Freshman English 10 

Historj 11. 1") Western Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 . 3 

Biology 16, 17 
or 

Biology 18, 19 10 

Chemistry 11. 12 10 

Mathematics 16 5 

TOTAL 48 

(16) Pre-Veterinary 

This is a one-\ear program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a senior institution. 
Some colleges and universities require a veterinary student to begin 
specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well-rounded foun- 
dation for the study of veterinarv medicine, it is recommended that he 
pursue the two year pre-medical program. 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 

History 14. 15 — Western Chilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Biology 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11. 12 10 

Mathematics 16. 17 10 

TOTAL 53 

(17) Teaching 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years by- 
colleges preparing teachers are general in nature: English, history, 
mathematics, sciences, social studies and physical education, to men- 
tion some of these. The program below enables prospective teachers to 



38 armstr om; co llege of savannah 

be certified l>\ tin- Stale Department of Education as having completed 
two years of college and entitles the student to the Associate in Arts De- 
gree. Some of the third year requirements can he completed at Arm- 
strong Evening College as extension classes of the University of Georgia. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15 10 Education 21 5 

Historj 14, 15 10 English 21. 22 10 

Biological Science 10 Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

Physical Ed. 11. 12, 13 3 Physical Education .3 

Political Science 13 5 Psychology 21a 5 

Art 11 or Music 20 5 *Electives 20 

*Electives 5 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

TERMINAL PROGRAMS 

An Associate in Business Administration Degree will be conferred 
upon those students who successfully complete one of the three-year 
terminal programs in business administration as outlined below. 

(18) Business Administration Accounting 

Three Year Terminal 
First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15— Freshman English 10 --English 21. 22 10 

History 14, 15 — Western Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 Economics 21, 24 — Principles 

Natural Science 10 and Problems 10 

Business Administration 24, 25 — Business Administration 27, 28 — 

Elementary Accounting 10 Business Law 10 

Electives 5 * * * Electives 15 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

Third Year 

Business Administration 3 1 Intermediate Accounting 5 

Business Administration 36, 37 — Income Tax Accounting 10 

Business Administration 29- (lost Accounting or 

Businr-- Administration 35 -Intermediate Accounting 5 

Economics 30 — Personnel Administration 5 

Mathematics 5 

Electives 15 

TOTAL 45 



:t Students in this curriculum should secure the catalog of the senior college 
which the) plan to attend and plan a program with an adviser. 

Recommended electives for elemental) teachers include health, geography. 
economics, Georgia problems "Social Science 4), English 28 and additional 
science courses. 

::;: English 28 may he Mih-tituted for English 22. 

*** Student- planning to complete the three-year program should substitute 
10 hour- in accounting foi electives. 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 39 

(20) Business Administration General 

Three- \ ear Terminal 
\ studenl who cannot transfer to a senior college at the <'n<l of 
his second \<-ai ma) <irt a broader Foundation for work a- a supervisor 
or junior executive In completing the program below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 114, 115— Freshman English 121, 122 World Literature 

English 10 or English 128 Public Speaking 

Hi-ton 111. 115 — Western and Business Administration 115— 

Civilization 10 Business Correspendence 10 

Natural Science 10 Business Administration 124, 125 — 

Economics 121, 124 10 Elementary Accounting 10 

Elective 5 Business \dministration T-127 

(E-370)— Business Law 5 

:;::|: Business Administration and 

Economics Electives 10 

Free Electives 10 

TOTAL 45 TOTAL 45 

Third Year 

Student will select with an adviser seven of the following subjects plus two 
free electives: 

Business Administration T-128 (E-371) — Business Law (2nd course) 5 

Business Administration T-151 — Principles of Transportation 5 

Business Administration T-160 ( E-351 ) — Principles of Management 5 

Business Administration T-161 — Principles of Insurance 5 

Business Administration T-162 (E-390)— Real Estate Principles 5 

Economics T-125 (E-312) — Elementary Economic Statistics 5 

Economics T-126 — American Economic History 5 

Economics T-127 ( E-326) — Money and Banking 5 

Economics T-128 (E-360) — Principles of Marketing 5 

Economics T-129 (E-386) — Labor Economics 5 

Economics T-131 (E-444) — Government and Business 5 

Economics T-132 (E-431) — Investments 5 

TOTAL 45 

(21) Business Administration Transportation 

Three-Year Terminal Program 
As a communications center. Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management, A com- 
mittee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck lines. 



* Numbers 100 or above are Evening College courses. 

** Students planning to complete the three year program should substitute 
10 hours in accounting for electives. 



1(1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the professional 
classes listed below . 



First Year 

English 111. 11") Freshman 

English 
Historj 11 1. 115- Western 

( '.'w ilization 

Business Administration T-151 — 

[ntroduction to Transportation 
Business Administration T-152 — 

Elementary Rates & 'tariffs 
Business Administration T-153 

Intermediate Rates & Tariffs 
Economics 121. 124— Principles 

and Problems 



Second Year 

English 121. 122— World Literature 
10 or English 128 — Public Speaking 

and Business Administration 115— 

10 Business < lorrespondence 

Natural Science 
5 Business Administration T-154 — 

Advanced Rate- \ Tariffs 
5 Busim-- Administration 1-155 — 

Interstate Commerce Law 
5 Business Administration T-156 — 

Interstate Commerce Commission 

10 and Public Service Commission 

Procedure 

Business Administration 124. 125 — 

Elementary Accounting 



K) 
K) 



TOTAL 



45 TOTAL 

Third Year 



10 



45 



Students will select 5 of the subjects listed under the third year of Business 
Administration-General plus Business Administration T-127. Business Law. Elec- 
tives to complete 135 hours total credits. 

(19) Business Administration General 

TwoAear Terminal 
Many students will not continue their formal education after leav- 
ing Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity to 
select those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient general 
education is included in the core curriculum to make this a well-rounded 
program. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 

English 10 

Historv 14. 15 — Western Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles 

and Problems 10 

Electhcs 5 



Second Year 

* English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 

Physical Education 

Business Administration 24. 25 

Accounting 

Business Administration 27 — 

Business Law 

Business Administration and 

( lommerce El' <ii\ es 

Typing 

Calculator and Comptometer 

Shorthand 

Business Administration — 34 
Intermediate \cct. 

Business Administration 28 — 
Business Law 
Electives (other) 



10 
3 

10 

5 

10 



10 



TOTAL 



[$ 



TOTAL 



English 28 may he substituted for English 22. 



18 






TERMIIS \l. PROGR Wi- 



ll 



(22) Transportation 

Fiftv-Hour Concentration in 



Mud 
receive a 



i;\ 
i; \ 
i;\ 
r»\ 
i: \ 
BA 



thorough backgroui 
satisfactory compl< 



I lolll 

>nts wishing a 
certificate upoi 

follow-: 

I '-151 Introduction to Transportation 
r«152 Elemi otarj Rates and Tariffs 
r*153 Intermediate Rates and Tariffs 
T-154 Advanced Rates and Tariffs 
T-155 Interstate Commerce law 
T-15(> Interstate Commerce Commission 
S rvice Commission Procedure 
Economics 121 and 124 — Principle- and Problems 
English 114 and 115 — Freshman English, or Englisl 
Speaking and BA 115 — Business Correspondenc 



ransp< 

id in 
•lion ( 



citation 
transpt 

»f the | 



citation 
iroeram 



ma) 
thai 



d V 



ublic 

i 128— Public 



TOTAL 



10 
10 

10 

50 



(23) Business Administration 

One-Year Program 
A one year program in Business Administration I with emphasis 
on business courses) for those persons who may not wish to complete 
the two-year concentration. A certificate will be awarded to those who 
successfully complete the program. 

Business Administration 24. 25. 34 15 

Economics 21. 24 10 

Business \dministration 27 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Pin -ical Education 3 

Elective 5 



TOTAL 



48 



(24) Commerce Secretarial 



This program is designed 
wish to qualify for secretarial 
training, a student is permitted 
theory courses in shorthand or 
subjects to supplement the tota 

First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 

English 

History 14. 15 — Western 

Civilization 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 

Natural Science 

Commerce 11 a-b-c — Typing 

Commerce 12 a-b-c — Shorthand 



to meet the needs of those students who 
positions in business. If. due to prior 
by the instructor to omit the beginning 

typing, the student must choose elective 

I college hours required. 

Second Year 



10 

10 
3 

in 
6 

L5 



Business Administration 24 — 

Accounting 

♦English 21. 22 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 
Commerce 21 a-b-c — Typing 
Commerce 22 a-b-c — Shorthand 
Phvsical Education 



TOTAL 54 



TOTAL 



44 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

(25) Commerce Stenographic 

\ studenl who has onl) one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the clerical skills which will enable her to secure employment 
as a stenographer or clerk. Whether or not a student will be placed 
in beginning theor) classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon 
how much previous training she has had in those subjects: a more ad- 
vanced standing must be approved by the instructor. A certificate is 
awarded upon completion of the following program. 

Commerce 11a, I), C — Typing 6 

< uiiiini ret- 12 a. It. c -Shorthand 15 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Business Administration 24 — Accounting 5 

* * English 14, 15 — Freshman 10 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 49 

(26) Home Economics 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who 
plan to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives 
are allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which 
have a vocational value or cultural subjects for worthy use of leisure 
time. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14. 15— Freshman English 10 English 21. 22— Sophomore English 10 

History 14, 15 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

Physical Education 3 and Decorating 5 

Natural Science 10 Home Economics 24 — Family 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation: Fundamentals 5 

Personal Development 5 Home Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing 5 Planning and Serving 5 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 Electives 20 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

(27) Human Relations* 

The Terminal sequence in Human Relations is designed to start 
with the student's immediate interests in learning methods of study and 
aptitude measurement. The next course, <>n principles and facts about 
the Individual's growth, needs, findings and learning about the world 
around him, i> followed 1>\ a practical application through experiments 
or l>\ interning in selected community programs where individual de- 
velopment and adjustment ma\ be directl) observed. This leads to a 

* Students in other concentrations may elect any Psychology or Sociology 
course in tlii~ program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites are 
necessary in Psychology 12 1 1 >. Sociology 20b and Psychology 22. 

* English 28 may be substituted for English 22. 

Kn-li-li 2K nun !>»• ~uh-t iiuted for English 15. 



TERMIN \L PROGR \\l> 



I I 



stud) of a person's relationship to his social groups, a stud) oi man iag< 
and famih adjustment, principles and facts about tin- ua\ thai out bo« 
ciet) Is organized and finally to a practical study, through Local organ- 
izations, of needs and resources for human adjustment in our commu- 
nity, \ student who completes this sequence should have a basic under- 
standing of himself and other- that will improve his effectiveness in hi- 
family, hi> work (whether in the home or employed elsewhere), his so- 
cial relationships and his responsible participation in communit) living. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English. 10 

Histor] 14, 15 Western Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

'Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

Political Science 13 5 

Psychology 20 — Applied Psychology 5 
Psychology 21a — Introductory 

Psychology 5 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 

Psychology 5 



18 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 Sophomore English 10 

Biologj 11. 15 — Genera] Zoology 

or 
Biology 16, 17 — Human Biology... 10 

Physical Education 3 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and 

Family 5 

Psychology 22 — Social Psychology.. 5 
Sociology 20a — Introductory 

Sociology 5 

Sociology 20b — Social Problems 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 



TOTAL 

(28) Liberal Arts 

\ -tudent in the Liberal Arts. Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his elective? from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

First Year Seeoiid Year 



Engli-h 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 

Historv 14. 15 — Western Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

* Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

**Electives 10 



English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

: : Klectives 35 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 



18 



Three Year Program 



Some students may wish to continue their studies into tin- third year. 
First Two Years of Liberal Arts. 

Third Year 

Classical Culture E-301 - E-302 10 hours 

History E-351 - E-352 10 hours 



* Note admission requirements for Mathematics 9 and Mathematics 16 as 
stated on page 65. 

** A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following de- 
partments: Foreign Language, Political Science. Economics, Fine Arts, Home 
Economics, Philosophv, Psychology - , Sociolosv. Mathematics (other than Math. 
19). 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF S AVANNAH 

Philosophy 110 

or 
Fine Aria E-300 5 hours 

Selecl 20 hours from the following: 20 hours 

French, German <>r Spanish 
Two additional laboratory (double) 

or 
Mathematics ( oui ses 

(Both physical and biological sciences will he covered in three-year program.) 
Engliah E-303 and E-304 
Sociology E-315 and E-360 

(29) Medical Technology 

This is a two-year program for those students who wish to meet 
the requirements of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and 
who will complete their training at some approved school of Medical 
Technology. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below . 

Armstrong College is affiliated with the Savannah School for Med- 
ical Technologists, which is nationally approved. It is possible for a 
student to meet all requirements for national registration through these 
two institutions. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15— Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 10 

History 14. 15 — History of Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Biologv 23 6 

Physical Education 11, 12 and 13... 3 Biology 21 5 

Mathematics 16 5 Chemistry 13. 25 12 

Biology 14, 15 10 Electives 12 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

(30) Nursing 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation with 
the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission of the 
instructor and the approval of the student's adviser, a student not en- 
rolled in the School of Nursing nun take an\ of the following courses: 

Biology 18. 19 10 

< Ihemistrj 11 5 

Sociology 20a 5 

Physical Education 11 1 

Biologj 21 

Home Economic- In 4 

Psychologj 21a 5 

TOTAL 35 



Technical Institute Programs 

Basic Subjects 

Required in all Technical Institute Programs 
Course descriptions for Technical Institute Programs are listed 
elsewhere in this Bulletin. \ stddenl ma\ register for an) <>f the sub- 
jects in the program of lii- choice as soon as he has mel the prerequi- 
sites. 

English 114 Freshman English 5 

GT 114 Technical Mathematics 1 5 

GT LIS Technical Mathematics II 5 

Physics 1 1 l Mechanics 5 

Physi< - 1 15 Electricity 6 

Physics 116 Heat. Sound, Light 5 

Engineering 111 Engine, ring Drawing 3 

Ps) « hology 120 \ pplied Psychology 5 

GT 113 Technical Report Writing 3 

GT 112 or Public Speaking 3 

English 128 Fundamentals of Speech 5 

45 or 47 



(39) Building Construction Technology 

Building Construction Technology deals with the design, con- 
struction and construction supervision of homes, industrial plants, of- 
fices, schools and hospitals. The student is taught to design, draw plans 
and follow through with construction details and methods. 

Graduates in this program will be qualified for many positions, in- 
cluding engineering draftsman, general contractor, junior engineer, 
architectural draftsman and estimator, building inspector, and many 
others. 

Civ. T 121 Elemental \ Surveying 6 

BCT 121 Graphics ' 7 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Material- 6 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 6 

BCT 212 ( loncrete Construction 6 

Civ. T 211 Structural Drafting I 3 

Civ. T 212 Structural Drafting II 3 

BCT 222 Building Design I 8 

BCT 223 Building Design II 7 

BCT 224 Building Design 111 7 

BCT 142 Construction Material- and Estimate- 6 

BCT 243 Building Equipment 3 

BCT 231 Architectural History 3 

71 

(31) Chemical Technology 

The curriculum for Chemical Technology has been designed to 
meet the needs of the chemical, paper and other related heavy industries 
for competent and well-trained technicians. The program gives the stu- 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAV A NNAH 

dent a working knowledge of the fundamental branches of formal chem- 
istry and chemical engineering. 

Industries are placing greater emphasis ever) year on instrumental 
methods of analysis which are far more rigid and precise than formal 
chemical methods. The student completing the curriculum in Chemical 
Technology will acquire training in the theory and use of these elec- 
tronic, optical and thermal instruments. 

Positions open to graduates are assistant to research personnel. 
control chemist, assistant to chemical engineers, analyst and pilot plant 
assistant, as well as many others. 

( Ihemistry 111 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 112 General inorganic 5 

Chemistry 113 Qualitative Inorganic Analysis 5 

Engineering 112 Engineering Drawing 3 

Chemistry 125a Quantatative Inorganic Analysis 4 

Chemistry 125b Quantatative Inorganic Analysis 3 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety 1M> 

*CT 120 Analysis of Variations 3 

*CT 121 Experimental Design 3 

*CT 160 Material & Energy Balances 5 

*CT 162 Elementary Chemical Processes 4 

*CT 165 Industrial Chemistry 4 

45V 2 

In addition, the student will select one of the two options listed 
below. 

PULP AND PAPER OPTION 

*CT 140 Pulping 4y 2 

*CT 141 Paper Machinery 4^4 

*CT 142 Paper Testing 3 

*CT 143 Pulp Testing 3 

*CT 164 Wood Structure and Properties 4 

19 
CHEMICAL OPTION 

Engineering 113 Engineering Drawing 3 

GT 120 Vpplied Higher Mathematics 5 

Math, matics 114 Slide Rule 2 

*CT 150 Organic Chemistry 5 

*CT 151 Industrial Chemical Analysis 3 

18 

(32) Industrial Technology 

The curriculum in Industrial Technology is designed to enable the 
graduate to compete successful!) for a variety of supervisory and man- 
agement positions in manufacturing industries. These positions are in 
such categories as personnel work, quality control, methods and cost 
control, and the equipment, planning and production functions. The 
graduate will also be qualified for many staff positions with transporta- 

s The-c courses will be taughl at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper 

Corporation. 



TKiailNAL n{()(;K\MS 47 



tion, distributing and utility companies, and for the operation <»f pri- 
vate business. 

Economics 121 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 124 Principles and Problems <>!' Economics 5 

Economics 1-128 Principles of Marketing 5 

Business \dm. 121 Principles of Accounting 5 

Engineering 1 12 Engineering Drawing 3 

Engineering 113 Engineering Drawing 3 

Chemistry 1 1 1 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 112 General Inorganic 5 

(. T 111 ' Industrial Safety 1% 

•IT 120 Manufacturing Piocesses 3 

*IT 121 Production Organization 3 

I I 122 Economic Analysis 3 

I I 123 Production and Cost Control 3 

II 124 Time and Motion Study 3 

* IT 125 Mechanical Methods 2 

*IT 126 Advanced Time and Motion Study 3 

•IT 127 Data Presentation 3 

•IT 128 Personnel Motivation 3 

63 

(37) Mechanical Technology 

This field embraces the manufacture and production of mechanical 
products and the tools, machines and processes by which they are made. 
In a broad sense mechanical technology is the creation and utiliza- 
tion of mechanical power, and men with technical institute type of 
training in this field possess a knowledge that is basic to companies in 
nearly every line of business throughout the world. 

Positions open to mechanical technicians include various kinds of 
inspection, maintenance men. engineer's assistant, foreman in various 
fields, production supervisor and junior designer of machines or tools 
and dies. 

Mathematics 114 Slide Rule 2 

Chemistry 111 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 112 General Inorganic 5 

Economics 121 Principles and Problems 5 

Engineering 112. 113 Engineering Drawing 6 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

*MT 120 Tools and Methods 5 

•GT 111 Industrial Safety 1% 

•IT 120 Manufacturing Processes 3 

•IT 125 Mechanical Methods 2 

*MT 122 Machine Shop 5 

*MT 123 Metalurgy, Welding, Heat Tr 6 

* *MT 126 General Sheet Metal 2 

*MT 127 Industrial Electricity 4 

*MT 128 Fluid Mechanics 5 

•IT 124 Time. Motion Study 3 



65% 

* These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper 

Corporation. 

** This class will be conducted at the plant of the Great Dane Trailers, Inc. 



48 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

(34) Civil Technology 

Civil Technology covers one of the broader fields in the Technical 

Institute Program. The civil technician is a surveyor, a construction 
man on buildings of all kinds, highways and railroads, hydroelectric- 
project.-., locks, dams, tunnel and similar projects. He is trained to 
handle work in any of these fields with a minimum of supervision. 

i i\ T 141 Blueprint Reading 3 

l'>< I . 142 Construction Materials and Estimates 6 

Civ. T 121 Elementary Surveying 6 

Civ. T 122 Route Surveying 5 

Civ. T 131 Highway Construction 3 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212 Concrete Construction 5 

Civ. T 212 Structural Drafting I 3 

Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 3 

Civ. T 224 Topographic and Contour Surveying \ 

Civ. T 223 Land Surveys 5 

Civ. T 232 Heavy Construction 4 

Civ. T 241 Hydraulics 5 

Civ. T 242 Water and Sewage Plant Operation 3 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

Civ. T 251 Photogrammetry 2 

65 

(35) Electrical Technology 

The student in Electrical Technology is trained in the fields of 
electric power generation, transmission, distribution and utilization. 
as well as the theory and application of electrical and electronic circuits, 
electrical machinery and industrial control equipment, wiring and 
illumination. 

Graduates of the electrical course are qualified to fill positions 
as production and maintenance technicians, laboratory and research 
technicians, electrical draftsmen, powerhouse operators and electrical 
equipment sales and service personnel. 

CT 120 Applied Higher Math 5 

( !iv. T 141 Blueprint Reading 3 

Elec. T 121 Alternating Current Circuits 1 6 

IN. . T 122 Alternating Current Circuits II 6 

Elec. I 223 Alternating Current Circuits III 4 

Elec. T 131 Basic Electronics 6 

Elec. T 231 Electrical Drawing 3 

Eire. T 232 Industrial Electronics 6 

Elec. T 241 Communications Circuits 6 

Elec T 251 Direct Current Machinery 4 

Elec. T 252 Alternating Current Machinery I 6 

Elt-c. T 253 Alternating Current Maehinerv II 5 

Elec. T 271 Wiring Methods 4 

Elec. T 272 Illumination 3 

Elec. T 273 Electric Power Distribution 4 

71 






TKIiMIWL PROGR VMS l«) 



(,'U>) Electronics and Communication Technology 

This course gives tin- student training in the fields of electrical 
and electronic circuitry, transmission lines, radiation, wave filters, in- 
strumentation and test equipment. telephone \M and I'M radio, televi- 
sion and radar. 

Students completing the electronics course should be able to fill 
responsible positions as production and maintenance technicians and 
project and control technicians in the fields of radio, television and ra- 
dar: electronics laboratory and research technicians and electronic 
equipment sales and service technicians. 

GT 120 Applied Higher Mathematics 5 

Kl.c. T 121 Uternating Current Circuits I 6 

Elec. T 122 Uternating Current Circuits II 6 

Elec. T 223 Uternating Current Circuits III 4 

Ci\. T 141 Blueprint Reading 3 

KV< . T 131 Basic Electronics 6 

Elec. T 232 Industrial Electronics . ;' 6 

Elec. T 233 Advanced Electronics 4 

Elee. T 241 Communications Circuits I 6 

Elec. T 242 Communications Circuits II 6 

Elec. T 243 Communications Circuits III 4 

Elec. T 254 Electrical Machinery 3 

Elec. T 261 Communications Technology I 7 

Elec. T 262 Communications Technology II 6 

Elec. T 263 Television Technology 6 

74 






Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to (1) withdraw an) 
course for which less than ten students register. (2) limit the enroll- 
ment in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of all 
classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as demand 
and staff personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed. 

Courses which are offered in the day program are assigned a 
number which is less than 100. All Evening College courses are num- 
bered above 100. In some course descriptions Evening College course 
numbers appear in parentheses. For example: Biology 16-17 1 116-117). 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture: the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory: and the third, the number 
of quarter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Human Bi- 
ology (5-0-5). 

Technical institute courses and economics and business adminis- 
tration courses marked with a "T" are terminal courses. The latter 
do not transfer to the University of Georgia. 

The quarters indicating when courses will be taught apply to the 
day sessions only, not the Evening College. 

ART 

Art 11 — Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. 

Drawing, painting and design principles, with some pertinent 
background history. Introductory practice in technique?, and applica- 
tion to everyday life needs. 

Art 113 — Ceramics (5-0-51. Laboratory fee: 82.00 

A beginner's course in the fundamentals of potter) and ela\ 

modeling. Various ways of forming clay, decorating, glazing and 

tiring suitable subjects.. 

Art 114 — Ceramics (5-0-5). Laboratory fee: $2.00. 

A continuation of the beginners course with emphasis on design. 
using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Work may 
be developed in potter) or ela\ sculpture. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 

Biology 

Biology II i 111 i General Botany (3-4-5). Fall, Laboratory fee, 

>UK). 

\ Btud) of the structure of roots, stems and leaves, basic physiology 

and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative species. 

Biology 12 l 112 I — General Botany (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory 
fee $4.00. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

\ stud) of reproduction, heredity and evolution of seed plants. 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes frequent field trips. 

Biology 14 (114) — General Zoology (3-4-5 1. Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey 
of the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species of 
the basic invertebrate phyla. 

Biology 15 (115) — General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Study of vertebrate structure and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. 

Biology 16-17 (116-117) — Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Four lectures and one demonstration period. 

A non-laboratory course beginning with a survey of the basic- 
biological principles and continuing with a study of the structure 
and function of the human body. The second quarter is a continuation 
of the first and concludes with a study of the principles of genetics 
and evolution. No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is 
completed. 

Biology 18-19 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (3-4-5). Fall 
and Winter. Laboratory fee, $4.00 each quarter. 

A two-quarter course considering the gross anatomy, histology and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physiol- 
ogy. Not for pre-medical and pie-dental students. 

Biology 20 (120) — General Entomology. (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite — One quarter of a laboratory biology. Four lectures and one 
demonstration period each week. 

A study of the structure, biology, classification and control of 
important and significant insects as applied to man. 

Biology 21 — Microbiology (3-4-5). — Spring. Laboratory fee. 
$5.00. Prerequisites: Ten hours of a biological science with a laboratory 
and five hours of inorganic chemistry. 

An introduction to micro-organisms with primary emphasis on bac- 



52 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA Y \\\ \H 

teria. The morphology, life history and public health importance of 
representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa and helminthes are 
considered. 

Biology 23 Comparative I ertebrate Anatomy (36-6). Fall. Lab- 
oratory fee, $6.00. Prerequisite: Biolog) 14 and L5. 

A stud) of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of 
the vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus. Necturus and the cat. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration 24 (124) — Principles of Accounting, In- 
troductory I 5-0-5 ) . Fall. Winter and Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedure- <>! 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working papers, 
accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals and the 
voucher adjustment system. 

Business Administration 25 1 125 I — Principles of Accounting, In- 
troductory (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: Business Admin- 
istration 24. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of financial state- 
ments. 

Business Administration 27 (T-127l — Business Law (5-0-5) Fall. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, 
rights of third parties and discharge. Agency : creation of an agency, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Business Administration 28 ( T-128 I — Business Law I 5-0-5 I . 
Spring. 

The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the foj- 
lowing subjects which are of particular interest to those planning to 
major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of 
partner-, termination. Corporation: formation, power rights of se- 
curit) holders, types <>f securities. Sale-: vesting of title, warrants. 
remedies. 

Business Administration 29 (T-129) — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
the order and the process methods. 

Business tdminist ration 34 I T- 134 I — Principles of Accounting, In- 
termediate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 



C()l RSE DESCRIPTIONS 53 

Basic accounting theor) and the solution <>f problems requiring an 

application of accounting theory. 

Business Administration 35 (135) Intermediate Accounting 
(5-0-5). Second course. Prerequisite: Business Administration 34 
i 1 34). 

\ continuation of Business Administration 34 I I L34) emphasiz- 
ing the theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the 
application of these theories and the Interpretation of financial state- 
ments prepared on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 36 (136) — Income Tax Accounting 
Fall. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

A study of federal income tax laws and the application of these 
laws to the income tax returns of individuals, partnerships and 
corporations. 

Business Administration 37 (T-137) — Tax Accounting (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 36 (136 1. 

A continuation of Business Administration 36 (T-1361 with em- 
phasis on corporations and fiduciary returns and soc'al security taxes, 
gift taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 115 — Bus'ness Correspondence (5-0-51. 
Fall. 

\ -tudy of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cation. Stress is placed upon the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing.. 

Business Administration T-116 — Report Writing. (5-0-51. 

Study and practice of effective English in business letters, technical 
papers and engineering reports. 

Business Administration T-131 — Retail Advertising and Sales Pro- 
motion (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

A course in retail advertising and sales promotion basicalK con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields — emphasizing the psychology of 
advertising as a branch of sales. The course explores the various media 
and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an advertising 
course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the average sales- 
man. 

Business Administration T-141 — Advanced Accounting (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 35 (135). 

A study of the problems of partnerships, parent and subsidiary ac- 
counting, consignments, installment accounting and other specialized 
accounting problems. 



54 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Business Administration T-142 — Advanced Accounting (5-0-5). 

Prerequisite: Business Administration T-141. 

A continuation of Business Administration T-141. 

Business Administration T-143 — Auditing Theory (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

Principles governing audits and audit procedure and a stud\ of 
the practical application of accounting knowledge as applied to audit 
procedures. 

Business Administration T-145 — C. P. A. Review (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Advanced Accounting and Auditing. 

A review of the interpretation of the federal income tax laws as 
applied to individuals, partnerships, estates and trusts: also a review 
of the methods of ascertaining and distributing cost in manufacturing 
concerns emphasizing the securing of costs under the job order, process 
and standard methods. 

Business Administration T-151 — Introduction to Transportation 
5-0-5). Fall. 

History of transportation: development leading to legislative super- 
vision of railroads: developments leading to Federal regulation of car- 
riers, other than railroads: freight classifications: principles of freight 
rates and tariffs. 

Business Administration T-152 — Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-151 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application: special freight serv- 
ices: freight claims, overcharge and loss and damage: freight tariff 
circulars; construction and filing of tariffs: terminal facilities and 
switching: and demurrage. 

Business Administration T-153 — Intermediate Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-152. or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Reconsignment and diversion; transit privileges: rules governing 
stopping in transit shipments for partial unloading and to complete 
loading: weights, weighing, and payment of freight charges: ware- 
housing and distribution: material handling: and packaging. 

Ilusiness Administration T-154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-153. or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Through routes and rates: milling in transit: technical tariff and 
rate interpretation: overcharges and undercharges: loss and damage 
claims; import and export traffic: and classification committee pro- 
cedure. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Business idministration T-155 Interstate Commerce Law, 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequesite: Business Administration T-154, or per- 
mission of tlu* instructor. 

Evolution <>f Interstate Commerce \ct; construction of Interstate 
Commerce Vet; Interpretation and application of Interstate Commerce 
\ct: application <>f penalties under the Interstate Commerce Vet; crea- 
tion and organization of Interstate Commerce Commission; practice 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business idministration T-156 — Interstate Commerce Commission 
and Public Service Commission Procedure. (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Business \dininistration T-156. or permission of the instruc- 
tor. 

Practice before Interstate Commerce Commission: statutory au- 
thority for awarding damages: revision of Commission's decision: gen- 
eral re\ iew. 

business Administration T-160 — Principles of Management. 
(5-0-5) Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful manage- 
ment principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Business Administration T-161 — Principles of Insurance. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 
tion of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted in- 
surance practices. 

Business Administration T-162 — Real Estate Principles. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 124. 

A consideration of the general principles of propertv utilization, 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens: the appraisal 
process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, management and 
salesmanship and regulatory legislation.. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 11 (111) — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall. Laboratory 
fee. S3. 00. Laboratory breakage fee. $3.00*. Prerequisite: Two years of 
high school algebra. Mathematics 9. or consent of instructor. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic elements 

* Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or broken 
and all requirement? of the laboratory have been complied with. 



56 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and their appli- 
cations. 

Chemistry 12 (112) — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter. Lab- 
orator) fee $3.00. Laboraton breakage fee. S3. 00*. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istr) II. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 11. 

Chemistry 13 (113) — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00*. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistn 12. 

A stud) of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 
common cations and anions by semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 25a (125a) — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-6-4). 
Winter. Laboraton fee. $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00.* Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 13 or approval of the instructor. 

A study of the fundamental theories and applications of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. No credit is 
given for this course before completion of Chemistry 25b. 

Chemistry 25b (125b)- — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (1-6-3). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00* Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 25a or its equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 25a. 

Commerce 

Commerce 11a — Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall and Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and master) of the keyboard. 

Commerce lib — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce lie — Intermediate Typing. (0-5-2). Spring. Labora- 
tor\ fee. $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed building 
and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, minutes. 
notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 12a-b — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 
Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dictation 
and transcription from studied material. 

* Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or broken 
and all requirements ol the laboratory ha\e been complied with. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 57 



Commerce 12c Intermediate Shorthand. (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 

i> required t<> take dictation at the rate of eight) words a minutes. 

Commerce L3a Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The objective of this course is to huild speed and accurac) in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thorough 
review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the operation 

of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 13b — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer I 0-5-2 I. 
Winter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixing decimal, percentages, discounts and chain dis- 
counts, cost, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain, 
cipher, divsions. prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 21a — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and busi- 
ness papers. 

Commerce 21b — A continuation of Commerce 21a (0-5-2). Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 21b (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee. S3. 50. An average of 60 words is attained. 

Commerce 22a — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 
Commerce 12a, b. c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in transcrib- 
ing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business ma- 
terial: the second half, to dictation material applying to major voca- 
tions. 

Commerce 22b — A continuation of Commerce 22a (5-0-5). Winter. 



58 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Commerce 22c — A continuation of Commerce 22b (5-0-5). Spring. 
A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 23a — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the ma- 
chine and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, 
hardware, electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, 
packing house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, depart- 
ment stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 23b — A continuation of Commerce 23a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboraton fee. S3. 50. 

Commerce 23c — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this last period. 

Economics 

Economics 21 (121) — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 (124) — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 21. 

A continuation of the study of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 21. 

Economics T-125 — Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5). 

An introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart making: elementary 
statistical procedures and their economic interpretation: introduction 
to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 126 — American Economic History ( 5-0-5 I . 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the Lnited 
States from the colonial period to the present with major emphasis on 
the period since 1860. It will deal with agriculture, industry, labor, do- 
mestic and foreign commerce, transportation, money and banking, and 
finance. 

Economics T-J27 — Money and Banking (5-0-51. Prerequisite: 
Economics 124. 

The role of mone\ in the economic organization: monetary theory: 
methods of stabilizing the juice Level; the integration of financial in- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 59 

stitutions; theor) of bank deposits and elasticit) of bank currency ; dis- 
count polic) and the Interesl rate of centra] banks; methods 01 regu- 
lating credit and business activities. 

Economics T-128 Principles of Marketing (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 121. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers; marketing functions: market- 
ing manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products; pro- 
posals for improving the marketing structure. 

Economics T-129 — Labor Economics (3-0-51. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 124. 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern labor 
organizations and their remarkable growth in recent years. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects of 
our labor problems including the study of wages, working conditions, 
unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hours, workers 
welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future develop- 
ments along these lines. 

Economics T-130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
sites: Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
istration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded per- 
sonnel program. 

Economics T-131 — Government and Business (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Economics 124. 

A general survey of the economic aspects of business regulation 
by the government, with specific reference to regulatory developments 
and methods in the United States; other activities affecting business 
in general, as extension of loans and subsidies, maintenance of fact- 
finding agencies and government owned corporation. 

Economics T-132 — Investments. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 
T-127. 

A study of stocks and bonds, market operations, investment mathe- 
matics, investment policies and financial statements. 

Education 

Education 21 — Orientation to Teaching (5-0-5). Fall. 

For the beginning or prospective teacher, this subject offers a 
broad understanding of the American spirit in education, the place of 
the school in society, its growth and changing function as a social in- 
stitution. The problem and discussion approach is used. 



60 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Engineering 

Engineering 11 illl) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 
Prerequisite: One year of plane geometry in high school or Mathematics 
L08. 

Topics of study include lettering: the use of the instruments; or- 
thographic projection: auxiliary views; sections and conventions. 

Engineering 12 (112 1 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions; dimensions; pic- 
torial representation; threads and fastenings; shop processes; technical 
sketching: working drawings; pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 (113) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings: 
working drawings: ink tracing on cloth: working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 19 (119) — Applied Descriptive Geometry (0-6-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include the soluton of problems involving points, 
lines, and planes by use of auxiliary views: the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes by revolution methods: simple inter- 
sections; developments of surfaces: an introduction to warped surfaces. 
Practical applications are emphasized. 

English 

Students will be assigned to freshman English according to results 
of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

English 14A — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall. Winter and Spring. 

This course includes theme writing, with emphasis on correct and 
forceful exprsesion. The student also reads and discusses such works 
as the Iliad, the Odessey, and plays by Aeschylus. Sophocles. Euripedes. 
and Aristophanes. 

English 14R — Freshman English (4-2-5). 

This course will satisfy the requirements for the first quarter of 
Freshman English. It is devoted to grammar, punctuation, spelling, vo- 
cabulary building, study habits, and organizational skills. The labora- 
tory portion of the course is designed to help students who show a de- 
ficiency in reading and related skills. The student's reading difficulties 
will be diagnosed. Good reading techniques will be taught. 

English ISA — A continuation of English 14A (5-0-5). Fall. Winter 
and Spring. 






C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 01 



The studenl reads and discusses selections from such authors as 
Montaigne, Swift, Dickens and English and American poets. Theme writ- 
ing is continued with practice in preparing documented paper-. 

English L5B / continuation of English L4R (5-0-5). Winter. 
Spring. 

This course is essentialU t In* same as English L5A, but more time 
is given to correct expression in writing. A documented paper i- pre- 
pared. 

English 21 — Sophomore English — World Literature (5-0-5). Fall 

and Winter. 

A study is made of some of the works of Shakespeare. Goethe's 
Faust, and selections from the Bible. 

English 22 — Sophomore English — World Literature (5-0-51. Win- 
ter and Spring. 

Selected modern poetry of 19th and 20th Century English and 
American poets. 20th Century American drama from Eugene O'Neill 
through Thomas Heggen; also the autobiography of Lincoln Steffens 
and selected realistic writings from Gogol through Faulkner including 
Flaubert's Madame Bovary are read. 

English 24 — An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 
A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special em- 
phasis on more recent poetry. 

English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Fall. (Not offered in 
1958-59). 

A survey of American literature and culture. Each student is asked 
to select one particular period or area or author for concentration, mak- 
ing reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. The course is 
primarily conducted by reading and discussion. 

English 27 — Modern Drama ( 5-0-5 ) . Fall. 

Class reading and discussion of modern plays from Ibsen's 
"Ghosts" to Miller's "Death of a Salesman." The course is centered on 
appreciation of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 
reading selected plays aloud. 

English 28 (128) — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Winter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gives some at- 
tention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, pho- 
netics, gesture, articulation, pronounciation. and regional speech dif- 
ferences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the fundamentals 
of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, extemporaneous, 
impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 30 — Principles of Theatre Art (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study and discussion of the fundamentals involved in the devel- 



62 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

opment of dramatic art and in the staging methods which have been and 
are now utilized in producing drama. The course will develop chron- 
ologically and will relate directl) to historical events and to the chang- 
ing form and method of writing for the stage. 

English 114 — Freshman English (5-0-5). 

Review of the fundamentals of usage — grammar, diction, punctu- 
ation, and sentence structure. Emphasis on effective expression in writ- 
ing, speaking, reading and on increasing the vocabulary. The student 
reads a collection of modern essays. 

English 115 — Freshman English I 5-0-5 I. 

The student reads and discusses a novel, a biography (Mark 
Twain), several plays (Pygmalion. Death of a Salesman), selected 
short stories and poems. Theme writing and grammar review are con- 
tinued. 

English 121 — Sophomore English (5-0-5). This course is the same 
as that described under the title English 21. 

English 122 — Sophomore English (5-0-5). 

Literature of the last hundred years with historical background: 
short stories from the Realistic writers — Dickens. Mark Twain, Zola. 
Tolstoi; plays — Ibsen, Chekhov, Gorky, Stringberg: poems — Tennyson. 
Browning, Hardy. Verlain. T. S. Eliot: selections from the works on 
scientific, philosophical and political writers of the period. 

French 

French 11-12 (111-112)— Elementary French (5-0-51. Fall and 
Winter. 

A course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well 
as grammar and reading. No credit for graduation will be given until 
the sequence is completed. 

French 21 (121) — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 (122) — Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of 
high school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: French 22. 

Selected plays of Corneille. Moliere and Racine. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 63 

Geography 

Geography 111 World Human Geography (5-0-5). 

\ Burve) of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activities 
and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

German 

German 11-12 (111-112) — Beginning German (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

Drill upon pronunciation and elements of grammar, conversation, 
and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as much 
as practicable in the classroom instruction. The idiomatic use of the 
language will he studied: reading of texts and translations, conversa- 
tion, dictation, and dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

German 21 (121) — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring. 

Grammar review and comparative grammar studied with the view 
of enabling students to write compositions. Short stories, life situations 
in Germany. German magazines, memorization of famous German 
songs. Conversation and dialogues. 

Health 

Health 111 — Personal and Community Health Problems (5-0-5). 

This course considers the meaning of health and factors influencing 
health behavior: health problems as related to the individual: overview 
of world, national, state and local health problems; community health 
organizations: mobilizing and evaluating community health resources. 
The legal aspects in community health and the laws governing re- 
portable diseases is given special attention. 

History 

History 14 (114) — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary 
Civilization (5-0-5). Fall. Winter, and Spring. 

This course compromises a chronological survey of the main cur- 
rents of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western 
Civilization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present 
time. 

History 15 (115) — A continuation of History 14 (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. 



64 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato. Dante. Machiavelli. Descartes. 
Locke. Jefferson. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Malthus. Marx and others. 

History 24 — History of England (5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from earl\ 
times to the present with special emphasis given to developments since 
the Tudor period. 

History 25 (125) — Recent European History (5-0-5 l. Fall. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 
voted to the first World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing that war and the complex of world events which preceded the Sec- 
ond World War. 

History 26 (126) — Recent American History (5-0-5). Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1865 to the present time. 

Home Economics 

Home Economics In — Nutrition and Food Preparation (3-2-4). 
Winter. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

The requirements of different individuals for energy, protein, 
minerals and vitamins; foods as a source of daily requirements, and 
the relation of food and the state of nutrition of an individual to 
physical fitness. 

Home Economics 10 — Orientations: Careers and Personal Develop- 
ment (5-0-5). Fall. 

The many opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 
and others will be discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
visit the class to show the many vocations dealing with the home. 

How to be more attractive through personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics 11 (111) — Elementary Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. 

Wardrobe planning and selection related to simple problems in- 
volving fundamental garment construction processes: care of clothing, 
including repair. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 65 



Home Economics 12 Foods (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00. 

Introductory course in food preparation, and serving <»l nutritious 
and palatable meals for the family. 

Home Economics 21 Home furnishings (4-2-5), Winter. Lab- 
orator) fee, $2.50. 

The interior and exterior planning of tlie home i> studied. Em- 
phasis 18 placed on sl\lc of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economics 23 — Clothing for the Enmity (2-6-5). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Planning the famih wardrobe problems. Construction of garments 
for famih member. 

Practical application of elementary textile study to the selection 
and use of clothing for the family. 

Home Economics 24 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Fall. 
A course in the famil\ with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

Home Economics 132. Nutrition Education for Teachers. 

A study of the diet habits of Georgia school children and the re- 
lation of nutrition to health. Emphasis is placed on how teachers can 
enrich school and community programs and improve the health of 
school children through nutrition education. (Not offered in 1958-59). 



■-■ 



Mathematics 

Mathematics 8 (108) — Plane Geometry ( 5-0-5 I . 

Topics of study include rectilinear figures, congruent triangles, the 
circle, similar figures and polygons. 

'Students will not receive college credit for this course if they 
have completed one unit of high school credit in geometry.) (Not of- 
fered in day school in 1958-1959). 

Mathematics 9 (109) — Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and 
Spring. 

This course includes a study of fractions, signed numbers, linear 
and quadratic equations, ratio, proportion, variation and graphs. 

( Students will not receive college credit for this course if they 
have completed two units of high school credit in algebra. I 

Mathematics 16 (116) — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or Mathematics 9. 

The course consists of functions and graphs, logarithms, linear and 
quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and the 
elementary theorj of equations. 



66 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Mathematics 17 (117) — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

\ course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the solution of trigonometric equations, proof of trigonometric identi- 
ties, graphs of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric 
functions. 

Mathematics 19 (119) — Mathematics of Finance I 5-0-5 I . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The necessary 
aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be studied. 

Mathematics 20 (120) — Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, graphs of functions, 
limits, differentiation of algebraic functions and some applications of 
derivatives. 

Mathematics 21 (121) — Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 20. 

This course includes the differentiation and integration of poly- 
nomials, problems in maxima and minima, approximations by differen- 
tials, areas, volumes, centroids, moment of inertia and work. 

Mathematics 22 (122) — Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

A continuation of Mathematics 21. This course includes differen- 
tiation of transcendental functions with application to rates, velocity 
and acceleration, curvature and Newton's Method. It also includes 
formulas and methods of integration. 

Mathemalics 23 (123) — Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 

A continuation of Mathematics 22. This course includes Simpson's 
rule, indeterminate forms, series, hyperbolic functions, partial deriva- 
tives and multiple integrals. 

Mathematics 114— The Slide Rule (1-2-2). 

An intensive stud) and practice in the use of all scales including 
the solutions of problems using the trigonometric scales. 

Music 

Music 11 — Elementary Theory and Sight Reading (5-0-5). Fall. 
A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 67 

to understand the Fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic 
dictation, melod) writing and an introduction to elemental*) harmony 

are included. 

Music \1 Theory tint/ Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 11. 

\ continuation of Music 11. with emphasis <>n harmony, harmonic 

dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and re- 
corded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 125 — Appreciation of Music (2-0-2). 

\ course designed for the musically untrained who wish an 
intelligent understanding of the art of music. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded listening sessions comprise the course. 

Applied Music Courses 

Applied music courses consist of private instruction in voice or 
an instrument. Two hours credit is received per quarter with six hours 
credit possible per year. A special applied music fee is charged for 
these courses as indicated under the course description. 

No practice facilities are available at the college. The student 
must have access to private practice facilities in order to enroll for 
applied music courses. 

Music 16 a,b,c — Woodwind Instrument. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee S48.00. 

Music 17 a,b,c — Violin. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one hour private lesson per week. Special fee S48.00. 

Music 18 a,b,c — Piano. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee S45.00. 

Music 19 a,b,c — Voice. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 21 a,b,c — Violin. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 17c. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 22 a,b,c — Piano. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 18c. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 23 a,b,c — Voice. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 19c. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 24 a.b.c — Woodwind Instrument. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 16c. Special fee $48.00. 



68 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Philosophy 

Philosophy 10 (110) — Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5). 

The Fundamentals of philosophy, tin- meaning and function of phil- 
osophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the relation 
of philosophy In art, science and religion. Includes a survey of the 
basic issues and major types in philosophy, and shows their sources in 
experience, history and representative thinkers. 

Philosophy 22 Honors Seminar ( 5-0-5 l . 

The Honors Seminar will stud\ some aspects of the nature of 
man in the natural world. The aim of the seminar will be to integrate 
what has been approached as specialization in the general curriculum. 
Instructors from the natural sciences, the humanities and the social 
sciences will serve as discussion leaders. 

This course is open by invitation to sophomores placed on the 
Permanent Dean's List at the end of their freshman year and to other 
sophomores who are recommended by their advisors. 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 11 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 
Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, 
road work, dual combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elementary Swimming ( 0-3-1 1. Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2!. Winter. 

Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 — First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 
Winter. Elective Credit. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
l»\ a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis i 0-3-1 I. Fall. 

Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' Course 
in Swimming (2-3-2). Spring. 

Ma\ be substituted for Physical Education 13. 

Physical Education 25 — Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Spring. 



COl'RSK INSCRIPTIONS 69 

Physical Education 26 Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 

\\ inter. 

Physical Education 27 Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1 I. \\ Inter. 

Physical Education 28 Adah Recreative Spar's (03-1). Spring. 
Consists of passive, semi-active and active games and spoils which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 31 — Wrestling for Men (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Science 

Physical Science 11 (111) (5-0-5). Fall. No prerequisite. 
\ stud) of the scientific method and its use in man's solutions of 
his physical environment and the nature of things about him. the 
"whys" and "wherefores" or the correlation of the physical universe. 
The student learns the fundamentals of physics and chemistry and 
acquires familiarity with their basic formulas and principles. He learns 
the similarity of the application of principles involving small particles 
to larger or planetary particles. 

Physical Science 12 (112) (5-0-5). Winter. 

Prerequisite: Physical Science 11. 

A continuation of Physical Science 11. In this course emphasis is 
placed on the study of the principles of inorganic and organic chem- 
istry with some examples of the application of chemistry in household, 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 
structure of the fundamental particles of matter (atoms and molecules) 
is used in the study of the classification of the simple components of 
matter ( elements ) and the changes which they undergo to form more 
complex substances (compounds). 

Physics 

Physics 14 (114) — General Physics — Mechanics. (4-2-5). Fall. 

Laboratory fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Mathematics 16 and 17 or 
consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics. Force and motion, work and power, energy, 
torque, and properties of gases are included. 

Physics 15 (115) — General Physics — Electricity. (4-2-5). Winter. 

Laboratory fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 14 or consent of the 
instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of magnetism, electric circuits, electric energy and power, 
electromagnetic induction, and principles of alternating current. 



70 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Physics 16 (116 I — General Physics — Heat, Sound, and Li{iht. 
(4-2-5). Spring. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 14 and 
L5 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 

the fields of heat, sound and light. I nder heat will he studied tem- 
perature measurement, thermal expansion, heat quantities, heat trans- 
fer, and thermodynamics. The study of sound includes wave motion, 
sound waves, and acoustics. Light includes reflection, refraction, spec- 
tra, color, and optics. 

Physics 21 (121) — Mechanics (5-3-61. Fall. Laboratory fee: $3.00. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 20 or 21, or concurrent. 

Physics 21, 22 and 23 together constitute a thorough course in 
basic physics for engineers. The five hours of class include one or two 
demonstration lectures per week. The solution of a large number of 
problems is required and the course includes application of the ele- 
ments of calculus. 

The laboratory work is designed to give practice in the art of 
making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipulation of ap- 
paratus and added familiarity with some of the concepts of physics. 
The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students the ability to 
decide under what conditions the greater expense of work precise 
measurements is justified. 

Physics 21 is an intensive course in mechanics. It includes the 
study of statics, kinetics, frictions, work, power, energy, machines, 
elasticity, hydrostatics, hydraulics and the mechanics of ga=es. 

Physics 22 ( 122 I — Electricity I 5-3-6 I. Winter. Laboratory fee: 
S3. 00. Prerequisite: Physics 21 and or those math requirements for 
Physics 21. 

Physics 22 is an intensive course in electricity. It includes the 
study of magnetism, static electricity, electric circuits, electric energy, 
and power, electromagnetic induction and the principles governing AC 
circuits as well as a study of some electrical instruments. 

Physics 23 ( 123 > — Heat, Sound and Light ( 5-3-6) . Spring. Labora- 
tor\ fee: $3.00. Prerequisites: Physics 21 and 22 and or those mathe- 
matics requirements for Physics 21. 

Physics 23 is an intensive course in heat, sound and light. It 
includes the stud) of heat, sound, light and atomic physics. Laboratorv 
exercises include temperature measurement, thermal expansion, heat 
qualities, heat transfer, thermodynamics, wave motion, sound waves. 
resonace, acoutics, reflection and refraction of light, the quantum 
theory, spectra and color, optics, and some optical instruments. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Political Science 

Political Science 12 1 112) — The Governments of Foreign Powers 
(5-0-5). 

A stud\ is made of the leading modem political theories, and 
attention la paid to the structure and powers <>f the major foreign gov- 
ernments, i Sot offered in da\ session 1 ( )5< ',-.")<) i . 

Political Science 13 (113). — Government of the United States 
i 5-0-5 I . Fall. Winter and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and workings of the 
national government in the I nited States and some of the major prob- 
lems of the state and local government. The course shows how develop- 
mental practice has created our government as it stands today. 

Psychology 

Psychology 20 ( 120)— Applied Psychology (5-0-51. Fall. 

This course is an orientation into college and into the choice of a 
career. The objective aids developed in the field of psychology will be 
used to discover effective ways of learning in general, and of studying 
in the college setting. Methods of objective measurement of a person's 
intelligence, interests, special aptitudes and personality traits will be 
explored and demonstrated. These will be applied to problems of edu- 
cational, vocational, and special interest training. For persons already 
in employment, special problems of personnel management and produc- 
tion output may be studied by modern psychological principles and 
techniques. Insofar as possible each student will have an opportunity to 
develop projects in the fields that will be useful in his own plans for 
education and career. 

Psychology 21a (121a) — Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

This course introduces the student to how the basic psychological 
processes operate and affect the behavior of the individual. Facts about 
patterns of growth from birth to maturity, learning to observe and deal 
objectively with the real world, having motivation, emotions, conflict 
and frustration are explored and applied to the student's present daily 
experience. Special study is given to unconscious influences on be- 
havior in the study of mechanisms of defense and ways of directing 
these processes into more realistic and creative use of one's feelings, 
understandings and actions. By the end of the course the student is 
expected to be able to see these processes at work in a given example of 
behavior and to begin to see the interaction of all these processes in 
a given act or experience. In the seminar type of class discussion the 
focus is on one of these topics at a time. The discussion objective is for 
each student, after study, to share his concept of the topic or some 



72 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

phase of it. link it with the information in the text, and test it against 
his ou n experiences. 

Psychology 21b Il21hl — Experimental Psychology (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Psychology 21a (121a). 

In this course the principles explained in Psychology 21a will he 
tested and explored by special projects and experimentation. Each 
student will select from a choice of topics introduced in 21a at least one 
systematic experiment and one live project, develop his plan of pro- 
cedure, carry out his stud) according to approved objective methods 
and prepare a satisfactory written report. Class time will be used for 
group consultation in order that each member will follow the work 
of each other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. Top- 
ics suitable for a special study project include aspects of child develop- 
ment or special behavior aspects of children, maturation, emotions, 
conflict, frustrations, mechanisms of defense, sensory processes, per- 
ception, learning, remembering, thinking, personality adjustment. 

Psychology 22 (122) — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21a (121a). 

This course centers on a study of the individual's interaction with 
his social groups ( family, friendship groups, clubs, church groups, com- 
munity groups). Forces of need, emotion and interests that bind the 
individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group interaction are 
analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used for experiencing 
the processes of communication and interaction in a group setting. 
Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, group conflicts, social 
stratification, mass communication, propaganda, public opinion forma- 
tion and methods of changing group patterns are studied by consulting 
the reports of responsible studies and by group projects. 

Social Science 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia ( 5-0-5 I . 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce: population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 

Sociology 

Sociology 20a (120a) — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter. 

Sociology is the objective study of the interrelationships of people 
as they interact with each other. This course presents information 
which has been gathered b\ systematic and scientific studies of human 
society. Material is drawn from Social Psychology on how an indi- 
vidual is 'socialized" to interact with other people within his culture. 
This leads to some objective study of population patterns and the 






COI RSE DESCRIPTIONS 73 



Bpecial distribution ol people, occupational patterns of human com- 
munities, traits and characteristics of culture groups, typical features of 
group behavior and of the effect of mass communication on public 

opinion. Looking at mankind as a whole. his institutions of family, re- 
ligion, economic behavior ami political behavior are studied as stable 
patterns for meeting basic human needs, and as infinitel) varied pat- 
terns adapted to the needs of different human groups. This introduction 
to BOciolog) is successful if it leads the student into a more informed 
identification with wider segments of the human famih and if he gains 
knowledge of objective methods for fact-gathering in his efforts to 
understand his human environment. 

Sociology 2()h I 120b )— Social Problems (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Sociology 20a (120a.) 

In this course the principles explored in Sociology will be ex- 
plored in planned projects of social research, supervised participation 
and or analysis of local community resources. These will take form in 
accordance with student interest and actual cooperative resources of 
community organizations and personnel. Suggested areas of stud\ 
are the fields of health (physical and mental), poverty, employment, 
education, government, crime (juvenile and adult), dependent children, 
housing, recreation, resources for the aged and others that reveal 
community problems or programs. Class time will be used for group 
consultation in order that each member will follow the work of each 
other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. At the end 
of the course a practical analysis will be made of how social change 
takes place in a community, with attention to the implications for 
change in national and international communities. For those who elect 
the Human Relations Concentration, a special seminar will be held at 
the end of this course for evaluating the students' experience in the 
whole Human Relations sequence. 

Sociology 21 (121) — Marriage and the Family. (5-0-5). Winter 

This course first introduces the student to the basic uniformities 
yet infinite varieties of human families. He selects for studying the 
family pattern in a culture different from his own, and then studies the 
impact of our own culture as it influences the roles and interactions of 
a typical family. This should give some sociological understanding of 
the family as a cultural institution. The rest of the course focuses on 
the individual within our culture growing and learning to love in a 
mature marital union. The early childhood learnings which affect basic 
attitudes toward parents, authority, the giving and receiving of love, 
and anger are presented from the findings of analytic psychology. Then 
each stage in the preparation for marriage is discussed: dating, court- 
ing, engagement, marriage, adjustment to money, sex, religion, in-laws, 
friends and children. Some practical studies of budget, house planning. 



74 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

settling differences, using help. etc. are worked out as projects. A 
prominent physician is guest lecturer on specialized information affect- 
ing the physical adjustment to marriage and parenthood. Through the 
process of free discussions in the group, the students begin to experi- 
ence the "give and take" that grows into honesty and mutual respect. 
The experience of this process is used as a way of learning the recipro- 
cal interaction that is basic to mature love of another person. 

Spanish 

Spanish 111-112 — Elementary (5-0-5). 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. 

Spanish 121 — Intermediate (5-0-5). 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years of 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar, conversation and readings. 

Spanish 122 — Intermediate (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Spanish 121. 
Continuation of Spanish 121. 

Spanish 123 — Survey of Spanish-American Literature (5-0-5). 

Prerequisite: Spanish 122. 

Outline of Spanish-American Literature and critical appreciation. 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

Courses are designated as follows: 

GT — General Technology for courses which are common to several 
concentrations. 

CT — Chemical Technology. 

IT — Industrial Technology. 

BCT — Building Construction Technology. 

Elec. T — Electrical and Electronic Technology. 

Civ. T — Civil Technology. 

MT — Mechanical Technology. 



COURSE DES CMITI ONS 75 

General Technology 

•GT 111— Industrial Safety i I • •_>-<> 1 \ ' 2 > . 

A basic study of industrial accident prevention considering the 
nature and extent of the accident problem. A practical stud\ is given 
the technique for control of industrial hazards together with the fun- 
damentals of good organization. 



*GT 112— Public Speaking. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: English 111 
or the equivalent. 

Study and practice in the fundamentals of public speaking. The 
subject includes training in selecting a subject, obtaining and organiz- 
ing material, and presenting speeches effectively. Each student makes 
several speeches before an audience. 

*GT 113 — Technical Report Writing (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 114 
or the equivalent. 

Study of the fundamentals of technical writing style and mechanics 
with practice in preparing reports of various types most likely to be 
used on the job by technicians. 

Technical Mathematics 

These courses are specifically designed for students who intend 
eventually to enter some field of technology. Special emphasis has 
been placed on the applications of mathematical principles to a wide 
range of specific engineering situations. 

GT 114 — Technical Mathematics I (5-0-5). 

This course covers the slide rule, a review of arithmetic and 
geometry, basic algebra, analytic geometry, more advanced algebra, 
and logarithms. 

GT 115 — Technical Mathematics II. Prerequisite: GT 114. 

This course consists of an introduction to analytical trigonometry, 
numerical trigonometry of the right triangle, oblique triangles and 
applications of numerical trigonometry, and vector algebra. 

GT 120 — Applied Higher Mathematics. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
GT 115. 

An application of mathematics to problems ordinarily not solvable 
by algebra or trigonometry. The subject consists mainly of an intro- 
duction to the more elementary principles and concepts of calculus. 



* Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corp- 
oration. 



76 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The application of the calculus is directed toward problems pertinent to 
the student's major field of stud\. 

GT 121 — Applied Higher Mathematics (5-0-5). 

A continuation of GT 120. 



Chemical Technology 

*CT 120 — Analysis of Variations. (3-0-3 1. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 116. 

An introduction to the application of recognized data analysis to 
technical problems. Instruction is given in the graphic presentation of 
engineering data for maximum effect. Emphasis is placed on determ- 
ination of data variance and comparison of two or more groups of data 
for significant differences. 

*CT 121 — Experimental Design. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: CT 120. 

Advanced statistical work, including problems in the determination 
of the proper procedure to be followed in gaining maximum information 
from given data. A study of experimental methods designed to produce 
adequate result data at a minimum expenditure of time and money. 

*CT 140— Pulping (41/0-0-41/2 I. Prerequisite: Chemistry 111. 112. 

A brief summary of all commercial pulping processes in use, 
including a study of wood species, chemicals used, cooking conditions, 
characteristics of pulp, and recovery processes. Also included is a 
thorough study of pulping processes now in widespread use in the 
South, with emphasis on the sulphate pulping of pine. 

*CT 141— Paper Machinery. (4%-0-4%). Prerequisite: CT 140. 

The study of the function and operation of the various machines 
used for the conversion of pulp to the finished product, including the 
component parts and associated equipment of the fourdrinier machine. 
A survey of the leading types of machines used in the further processing 
of paper and paperboard for the production of bags, boxes and similar 
products. 

•CT 142— Paper Testing (1-4-3). Prerequisite: CT 140. 

A study of the physical properties of paper and paperboard. with 
emphasis on the characteristics commonly tested. Details of the con- 
struction, principle and operation of testing equipment are studied. 

*CT 143— Pulp Testing (1-4-3). Prerequisite: CT 140 

A comprehensive review of standard mill and laboratory pulp 
testing equipment and procedures. The interrelationships of different 
pulp properties are studied, together with the theoretical and practical 



COI RSE DESCRIPTIONS 77 



considerations of permanganate number and < »t h< -r measures <>f the 
degree of pulping. 

*CT 150- -Organic Chemistry (5-0-5). 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 117 and Chemistry 25l>. 

\ classroom survey of the types of organic compounds, their 
names and structures, preparation, properties and reactions, including 
electronic mechanisms involved in the reaction;-. 

*CT 151 — Industrial Chemical Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 25b. 

The application of chemical principles to industrial processes of 

water treatment, paper manufacture, waste disposal, acid manufacture 
and various other related processes in the paper industry. 

*C7" 160 — Material and Energy Balances (5-0-5). Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 116. or GT 114. Chemistry 111. 112. Physics 114. 115, 116. 

A study of the basic principles of physical chemistry and the 
application of these principles in the solution of industrial problems. 
Much attention is given to the laws of thermodynamics and kinetics 
and the intergration of these laws into process design procedures. 

*CT 162 — Elementary Chemical Process. (4-0-4). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 25b. CT 160. 

A study of the transformation of energy and heat transfer, evapora- 
tion, distillation, drying, and flow of fluids. 

*CT 164 — Woodstructures and Properties. (3-2-4). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry ill, 112. Physics 114. 115, 116. 

A course covering the basic process of the formation of wood 
fibers in the living plant and the changes which occur during and 
after the life of the plant. A resume of physical and chemical character- 
istics of southern woods, and the means by which these characteristics 
may be controlled or altered. 

*CT 165 — Industrial Chemistry. 4-0-4). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
112. 

The course covers fundamental chemical processes and reactions 
used in the manufacturing of a large variety of chemical compounds. 
It also gives a general view of the problems of the chemical industry. 

Industrial Technology 

*IT 120 — Manufacturing Processes (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Math- 
matics 116, or GT 114. Physics 114. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
tools and basic manufacturing operations. 

* Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corp- 
oration. 



78 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

*IT 121 — Production Organization I 3-0-3 I . Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 121-124. and IT 120 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in planning for production budgeting, plant location, 
machinery and equipment selection, building and service selection, 
maintenance planning, plant layout, materials handling, storekeeping 
planning, personnel organization, employee selection and training. 

*1T 122 — Economic Analysis 1 3-0-3 1. Prerequisites: Business 
Administration 124 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in economic, financial and intangible analysis. A stud\ 
is made of the technique of making a decision among alternatives on 
the basis of comparative cost and suitability. A study of quality control 
methods is included. 

*IT 123 — Production and Cost Control 1 3-0-3 I . Prerequisites: 
Business Administration 124 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in factory operation, including scheduling, planning and 
detailed control of production, as well as the analysis and control of 
costs of manufacturing. 

*IT 124— Time and Motion Study I 3-0-3 I . Prerequisites: IT 121 
or approval of the instructor. 

The study of working procedures to determine the best method, 
the best human motions and the time standard or measure of human 
efficiency. 

*IT 125 — Mechanical Methods (0-4-2). Prerequisites: Engineering 
113. Mathematics 117 or GT 115. IT 124 and Physics 112. 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
mechanisms and jig and fixture design, including actual designing of 
simple machines, jigs and fixtures. 

*IT 126 — Advanced Time and Motion Study ( 3-0-3 1 . Prere- 
quisite: IT 124 or approval of the instructor. 

\ continuation of IT 124 designed for students specializing in this 
field. 

*IT 127— Data Presentation 1 3-0-3 1 . Prerequisite: IT 124 or 
approval of the instructor. 

Problems in graphical and numerical analvsis of data. Problems 
in presenting data in the most efficient and least costly form in terms 
of time required for use. Simple graphs and charts, alignment charts, 
families of curves and multi-variable chart-. 



* Clause* to be conducted at the plant of the I nion Bag-Camp Paper Corp- 
tration. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 79 



*IT L28 Personnel Motivation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Psychology 
L20. 

The course gives primar) consideration to human factor- in the 

design, approval and installation of personnel practices, procedures 
and systems. The case study method is used. 

Mechanical Technology 

I//' 120— Tools and Methods I 5-0-3 I . Prerequisite: Physics 114. 

An introduction to the field of metal work and industrial manu- 
facturing. Possibilities and limitations of various machine tools are 
developed. The characteristics of different materials are covered as 
well as their adaptability to the various processes. Each process is 
covered from a technical viewpoint. Correct terms are introduced so 
that the student will he able to use the language of the engineer or 
technician. 

*MT 122 — Machine Shop (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Mathematics 117 
or GT 115 and Civ. T 141. 

Fundamental machine operations of drilling, reaming, turning 
between centers, chuck work, thread cutting, shaper work, layout and 
finishing. Special attention will be given to cutting speeds, tool and 
drill grinding and machine upkeep. 

*MT 123— Welding, Metallurgy and Heat Treating (4-4-6). Pre- 
requisites: Physics 114, Chemistry 112 and Civ. T 143. 

Fundamentals of metallurgy and heat treating, including a survey 
of arc and acetylene welding. Emphasis is placed on material properties 
and the effect which alloying elements and or heat treatment has on 
them. 

**MT 126— General Sheet Metal (1-2-3). Prequisite. MT 122. 
Shop problems, including layouts and methods of fabrication of 
sheet metal. 

"MT 127 — Industrial Electricity (3-2-4). Prequisite: Physics 115. 

Basic elements of electrical circuits and machines. This will include 
series and parallel circuits, magnetism. D. C. motors and generators. 
A. C. motors, manual and magnetic controllers. 

*MT 128— Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Civ. T 143. 
Chemistry 112 and Physics 114. 

Basic principles of fluid mechanics and application to fluid flow 
and instrumentation. 



* Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corp- 
tration. 

** This course will be conducted at the Great Dane Trailer plant, through 
the cooperation of Great Dane Trailers, Inc. 



80 \KMSTKONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Building Construction Technology 

BCT 121 — Graphics (3-8-7). Prerequisite: Engineering 111. 

\n introductory study in architectural drawing and the principles 
of visual design. This subject equips the student with a hasic knowledge 
of drawing sections, plans, perspective and presentation drawing in ink. 

BCT 142 — Construction Materials and Estimates (5-2-6). 

An introduction to the materials most commonly used in the 
erection of structures, and the preparation of material and labor quan- 
tity sur\eys from actual working drawings and specifications. 

BCT 211 — Wood and Steel Consiruction 1 3-6-6 1 . Prerequisite: 
Civ. T 143. 

A stud\ of the design of beams, girders and columns in both wood 
and steel. Included is a study of the various timber fasteners, steel and 
timber trusses and steel frameworks. 

BCT 212 — Concrete Construction (3-6-61. Prerequisite: Civ T 143. 

A study of the properties of reinforced concrete with the determi- 
nation of direct stresses and bending stresses in beams, slabs, girders 
and columns. Laboratory work consists of problems and a study of the 
methods of testing various concrete members. 

BCT 222— Building Design I (3-10-81. Laboratory fee $1.50. Pre- 
requisites BCT 121 and BCT 142. 

Residential Design. This subject requires of each student a com- 
plete presentation drawing, a complete set of working drawings and a 
complete set of specifications for a dwelling house. Scale models will 
1) ' built from working drawings by groups of students. 

BCT 223— Building Design II (3-8-7). Prerequisites: BCT 222 
and BCT 211. 

Architectural design, working and structural drawings of more 
complex structures than those studied in BCT 222. Structural computa- 
tions are required. 

BCT 224— Building Design III (3-8-7). Prerequisite: BCT 223. 
A continuation of BCT 223. 

BCT 243 — Building Equipment ( 3-0-3 I. Prerequisite: Plnsics 116. 

A brief survey of the principles of heating, ventilating, plumbing, 
air-conditioning, lighting and electric wiring of buildings from the 
construction point <>f \ lew 

BCT 231 -Architectural History ( 3-0-3 i. 

A stud) of the progress of architecture. The material covered 
includes a review of architectural forms from early Egyptian to modern 
Engineered Architecture. 



CO] RSE DESCRIPTIONS 81 

Civil Technology 

Civ. I \1\ Elementary Surveying (3-96). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 117 or GT L15, or concurrently. 

Construction, care and use of surveying instruments; theory and 
practice of chaining; differentia] and profile leveling; transversing; 
computation <>f areas and earthwoi k: theor) and practice ol stadia 
and its application to topographic surveying; I . S. G<>\ t. system of 
public land surveys; reduction and plotting of field notes; the inter- 
pretation and plotting ol field notes of topographic surveys. 

Civ. T 122 — Route Surveying (3-6 5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Reconnaissance, preliminary location and construction surveys 
For routes of all kinds, including simple, compound and reverse curves 
US4 d on highways and railroads: superelevation of curves; computations 
of earthwork; construction of quantity, mass and haul diagrams. For 
a final project each laboratory group must lay out a complete highway 
location with each student submitting a complete set of plans, profiles, 
cross sections and earthwork computations for this location. 

Civ. T 131 — Highway Construction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
122. 

\ stud) of highway location, grading, drainage, surfacing, main- 
tenance and administration. 

Civ. T 141 — Blueprint Reading ( 3-0-3 I . 

A study of architectural blueprints for students who must trans- 
late drawing into actual existing structures. This course is also useful 
for students interested in general layout of electrical, plumbing, heating 
or air-conditioning systems. 

Civ. T 212 — Structural Drafting I (0 6-2). Prerequisite: Engineer- 
ing 111. 

Structural steel framing practices and preparation of shop drawing 
for steel fabrication. 

Civ. T 213— Structural Drafting II (0-62). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
212. 

Preparation of detail drawings for concrete structures. 

Civ. T 223 — Land Surveys (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory and practice of land surveying: sub-divisions: filing and 
recording deeds: U. S. system of land subdivisions. U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic plane coordinate systems: county and state laws; computa- 
tions on astronomical observations for azimuth determination. Georgia 
Land Lot system of land subdivision. 

Civ. T 143 — Mechanics of Materials (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Phvsics 
114 and Mathematics 117 or GT 115. 



82 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

A stud) of coplanar forces and force systems, truss solutions, force 
systems in space, friction and centroids; direct stress, properties of ma- 
terials, riveted and welded joints, torsions, stresses in beams, beam de- 
flection, and columns. 

Civ. T 224 — Typographic and Contour Surveying (2-6-4). Pre- 
requisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory, description and use of advanced surveying instruments 
and methods: practice of state and local coordinate systems for cadastral 
surveys and construction work: field work for the design and con- 
struction of engineering projects: use of the Plane Table on topographic 
surveys: theory, description and purposes of the many types of maps. 
plans and profiles used by engineers: hydrographic surveying: alti- 
metry. 

Civ. T 232 — Heavy Construction (3-3-41. Prerequisite: BCT 142. 

Heavy construction practices. This subject acquaints the student 
with the many common pieces of heavy construction equipment and 
apparatus: operation, use. limitations and maintenance of this equip- 
ment are covered along with the methods, organization and manage- 
ment for both large and small jobs. Field trips are made to construction 
projects to illustrate the usage of various pieces of equipment. 

Civ. T 241 — Hydraulics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Phvsics 114 and 
Civ. T. 143. 

Elementary principles of hydraulics with special emphasis on 
static pressure, flow through pipes, channels and over wires. 

Civ. T 242 — Water and Sewage Plant Operation (3-0-3). Pre- 
requisite: Civ. T 241 or concurrently. 

A study of operation of water and sewage treatment plants and 
the tests made in these plants. 

Civ. T 251 — Photogrammeiry (06-2). Prerequisites: Civ. T 121 
and Civ. T 224. 

The preparation of maps and charts from aerial photographs by 
Stereoscopic and ground surveying methods. Specifications and re- 
quirements for aerial surveys. 

Electrical Technology 
Electronics and Communications Technology 

Elec. T 121 — Alternating Current Circuits 1 (5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 116. or GT 114. Physics 115. 

Fundamentals of alternating current theory and practice as ap- 
plied to single-phase circuits. Properties of resistance, inductance and 
capacitance. Resistance networks. Generation of alternating emfs and 



COURSE DES CRIPTIONS S3 

elementary wave shape analysis. Reactance, impedance and phase re- 
lations in series an.) parallel circuits. Resonant circuits. Complex 

notation, vector anaKsis and use of the slide rule 

Elec. T 122 ilternating Current Circuits II (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T 121. Mathematics 117 or GT L15. 

Advanced a-c theory and practice as applied to single-phase cir- 
cuits. Further analysis of series and parallel circuit- using complex 

notation and vector analysis. Admittance, coductance. and SUSCep- 

tance. Anto-resonanl circuits. Coupled-circuit theory, impedance trans- 
formation, transformer theory, mutal inductance and reflected im- 
pedance. Construction, classification, regulation, loss determination 
and efficiency of single-phase transformers. 

Elec. T 131 — Basic Electronics (5-3-6). Prerequisite: Elec. T 121. 

Basic study of the control of free electrons in elementary electronic 
circuits. Electron emission, classification and characteristics of high- 
vacuum tubes, tube characteristics curves. Rectification, amplification, 
amplification factor, trans-conductance plate resistance, load lines, stage 
gain and basic amplifier circuits. Types of bias. Classification and 
characteristics of gas-filled, vapor-filled, and cathode ray tubes. Hard- 
tube and soft-tube voltage regulator circuits. Conversion efficiency, 
ripple factor and circuit analysis of single-phase, half-wave, full-wave 
and bridge rectifier circuits. 

Elec. T 223 — Alternating-Current Circuits III (3-3-4). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T 122 and Mathematics 120 or GT 120. 

Study of polyphase circuits, balanced and unbalanced, including 
circuit analysis, distribution systems, transformers and transformer 
connections, rectifier circuits and instrumentation. 

Elec. T 231 — Electrical Drawing (0-6-3). Prerequisites: Engineer- 
ing 111 and Elec. T 121. 

A study of A.S.A. and A.I.E.E. standard electrical drawing sym- 
bols and preparation of electrical drawings including scehmatics. single- 
line diagrams, wiring diagrams, layouts and others. 

Elec. T 232 — Industrial Electronics (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 122, Mathematics 120, or GT 120, Elec. T 131. 

Study of basic industrial electronic circuits and application of these 
circuits to such devices as electronic timers, voltage regulators, electro- 
static air cleaners, motor and generator control systems, photo-electric 
systems, web and register control systems, and induction and dia- 
electric heating equipment. 

Elec. T 233 — Advanced Electronics (3-3-4). Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 261 or concurrently, Elec. T 232. 

Study of special electronic circuits, including special amplifier 



84 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



and oscillator circuits, non-sinusoidal wave generators, pulsing cir- 
cuits, clamping, advanced stud) of transients, transistor principles and 
circuitry and Bervo-mechanisms. 

Elec. 7 241 — Communications Circuits I I 5-3-6 1. Prerequisites: 
Elec.T 122, Elec. T 131. 

Stud) of the operating principles of telephone equipment and 
circuits. Local-battery and common battery manual exchanges. step- 
In -step and all-relay automatic exchanges. Basic rela\ circuits for 
digital control. Matched transmission lines for audio frequencies, dis- 
tributed and lumped line constants, pads and attenuators, constant-k 
and m-derived filters for low-pass, high-pass, band-pass and band- 
elimination. "Pi". "T", and "LL" sections. 

Elec. T 242 — Communications Circuits II (5-3-61. Prerequisite: 
Elec. T 261 or concurrently. 

High-frequency transmission line concepts and practical applica- 
tions. Impedence-matching concepts and methods, transmission-line 
circle diagram, propagation, standing waves, basic antenna theory, 
antennas for low-frequency and high-frequency applications, and high- 
frequency measuring techniques. 

Elec. T 243 — Communications Circuits III (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 233 and Elec. T 242. 

Microwave techniques, theory and practice in pulse circuits, ultra- 
high-frequency amplifiers, transit-time effects, wave guides and cavit) 
resonators, dynatrons. transitions, klystrons and magnetrons. Prin- 
ciples of radar, types of scan, radar transmitting and receiving systems. 
synchronization, and specific studv of ASC-1 and APS-3 radar systems. 

Elec. T 251 — Direct Current Machinery (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 122. Mathematics 120 or GT 120. 

Construction, characteristics, operation and control, and industrial 
applications of direct current motors and generators. Electrical and 
mechanical characteristics of the various standard forms of field and 
armature windings. 

Elec. T 252 — Alternating-Current Machinery (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T223. Elec. T 251. 

Construction, characteristics, operation and control, and industrial 
application of polyphase induction and single-phase motors. 

Elec. T 253 — Alternating-Current Machinery (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec T 252. 

Construction, characteristics, operation and control, and industrial 
applications and synchronous generators, synchronous motors and syn- 
chronous converters. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 85 

Elec. T 254 Electrical Machinery (2-3-3). Prerequisites: Elec. T 
223 or concurrent}) . 

f electrical rotating machines, direct and alternating 



•ur\r\ 



current Construction, characteristics, operation and control and in- 
dustrial applications of d-c, Bingle-phase, a-c and polyphase a-c motors 
and generators. 

Elec. T 261 — Communications Technology I (5-6-7). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. r 211. Elec. T 232. 

The stud) of voltage amplification a> applied to radio-frequenc) 

and audio-frenquenc) circuits. Analysis of amplifier circuits and coup- 
ling methods, radio-frequency tuning circuits, regeneration and genera- 
te e circuits, decoupling networks and basic oscillator circuits. Con- 
struction, tuning, and alignment of superheterodyne receivers. 

Elec. T 262 — Communications Technology II 15-3-6). Prerequis- 
ite: Elec. T 233. Elec. T 261. 

\dvanced study of radio communication circuits. Amplitude- 
modulated transmitters, power amplifiers, phase inverters, push-pull 
amplifiers and modulator circuits. Broadcast studio techniques, re- 
corders, and recording and control room equipment. 

Elec. T 263 — Television Technology (5-3-61. Prerequisite: Elec. 
T 233. Elec. T 262. 

Principles of frequency modulation, methods of modulation and 
demodulation. FM transmitter and receiver circuits. Federal Communi- 
cations Commission standards for television transmission. Camera and 
picture tubes, composite video signal, television receiver circuits, power 
supplies, video amplifiers, deflection circuits, alignment procedures, 
transmitters circuits and color television. 

Elec T 271 — Wiring Methods (3-3-4). Prequisite: Elec. T 252. 

Types of wiring and wiring methods used in buildings. Selection 
of wire sizes, fuses, circuit breakers, insulation, distribution systems, 
control circuits, and service entrances. Design and layout of electrical 
wiring systems for lighting, motors and control circuits in accordance 
with standard practice and the recommendations of the National Elec- 
trical Code. 

Elec. T 212— Illumination (2-3-3). Prerequisite: Elec. T 122. 

Illumination principles and practices. Modern illumination princi- 
ples, calculation procedures, and equipment are coordinated in design 
problems of complete fluorescent and incandescent light installations. 

Elec. T 273 — Electric Power Distribution (3-3-4). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T. 253 or concurrently. 

Generation, transmission and distribution of electric power. Load- 
center distribution, sub-station operation, system and line protection, 
circuit analysis of distribution in lines, and electric utility practices. 



86 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

University of Georgia Extension Courses 

The classes listed below are University of Georgia Extension courses. 

Business Administration and Economics * 

Business Administration E-311 Introductory Cost Accounting < 5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-351 Principles of 

Organization & Management (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-370 Business Law, first (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-371 Business Law, second (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-390 Real Estate Principles (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-515 Income Tax Accounting (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-519 Tax Accounting (5-0 5) 

Economics E-312 Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5* 

Economics E-326 Money and Banking (5-0-5) 

Economics E-360 Principles of Marketing (5-0-5) 

Economics E-386 Labor Economics < 5-0-5 > 

Economics E-431 Investments ... ( 5-0-5 » 

Economics E-444 Government and Business ( 5 0-5) 



Cla 



SS1CS 



Classical Culture E-301 Greek Culture (5-0-5) 

Classical Culture E-302 Latin Culture (5-0-5) 



English 



English E-303 English Literature to 1800 (5-0-5) 

English E-304 English Literature after 1800 (5-0-5) 

English E-343 Contemporary Diama (5-0-5) 

English E-314a Children's Literature (5-0-5) 



History 

History E-351 American History to 1865 1 5-0-5 ' 

History E-352 American History since 1865 (5-0-5) 



Health Education 

Health Education E-344 Problems in School 

Health Education (5-0-5) 



* Economics 121 and 124 are prerequisites to all advanced courses in eco- 
nomics and business administration, except by special permission of the instructor. 



COURSE DESCR I PTI ONS 87 

Music 

Music E-302 Method- o! Teaching 

Public School Music (5-0-5) 

Music E-312 Public School Music 

For Elementary Grades (5-0-5) 



Psychology 

Psychology E-414 Psychology of Personnel (5-0-5) 

Psychology E-423 Abnormal Psychology (5-0-5) 



Social Science 

Social Science E-4 Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5) 



Sociology 

Sociology E-315 The Field of Social Work (5-0-5) 

Sociology E-360 Contemporary Social Problems (5-0-5) 



Speech 

Speech E-8 Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5) 



INDEX 

Admission to ('lass 26 

Admission to College 14-16 

Admission of Freshmen 14 

Admission of Special Students IS 

Admission of Transient Students 15 

Admission of Veterans 15-16 

Administration 5-11 

Admission by Transfer (Advanced Standing) 15 

Advisement and Placement Tests 25 

Aims 13-14 

Art. Course Descriptions 50-51 

Assemblies. Attendance at 28 

Associate Degree 14-30 

Athletics 21 

Attendance Regulations 28 

Audio-Visual Instruction 19 

Biology. Course Descriptions 51-52 

Building Construction Technology, Course Descriptions 80 

Building Construction Technology Program 45 

Business Administration. Course Descriptions 52-55 

Business Administration, Senior College Preparatory 32 

Business Administration, Terminal 38-41 

Business Administration. 1-Year Program 41 

Business Administration, 3-Year Programs: 

Accounting 38 

General 39 

Transportation 40-41 

Calendar— 1958-1959 3-4 

Civil Technology, Course Descriptions 81-82 

Civil Technology Programs 48 

Chemical Technology. Course Descriptions 76-77 

Chemical Technology Programs 45-46 

Chemistry, Course Descriptions 55-56 

College Commission 5 

Commencement Exercises 16 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 56-58 

Commerce, Secretarial, Terminal ! 41 

Commerce, Stenographic 42 

Conduct 26 



INDEX (Continued) 

Core Curriculum 31 

Counseling 16 

Course Load 25-26 

Course Descriptions 50-85 

Course Numbers 50 

Curriculums: 

Senior College Preparatory Programs 32-38 

Technical Institute Programs 45-49 

Terminal Programs 38-44 

Dean's List (See Honors) 27 

Dismissal From College 29 

Dramatics (Masquers) 21 

Economics, Course Descriptions 58-59 

Education. Course Descriptions 59 

Electrical Technology, Course Descriptions 82-85 

Electrical Technology Program 48 

Electronics and Communications Technology 49 

Engineering, Senior College Preparatory 32 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 60 

English, Course Descriptions 60-62 

Evening College 22-24 

Extension Courses, University of Georgia 86-87 

Extension Courses Credit at the University of Georgia 24 

Faculty 6-11 

Fees 17-18 

Forestry, Senior College Preparatory 32-33 

French, Course Descriptions 62 

General Information 13-24 

General Regulations 24-30 

Geography, Course Descriptions 63 

German, Course Descriptions 63 

Glee Club 21 

Grades 26-27 

Graduation, Requirements for 29-30 

Health, Course Descriptions 63 

History of the College 13 

History, Course Descriptions 63-64 

Hodgson Hall 18-19 

Holidays 3 



INDEX (Continued 



Home Economics, Course Descriptions 61-65 

Home Economics, Senior College Preparatory 33 

Home Economies. Terminal 42 

Honors 27 

Human Relations, Terminal 42-43 

Incomplete Grades. Makeup of 26-27 

Industrial Management 33 

Industrial Technology, Course Descriptions 77-79 

Industrial Technology Program 46-47 

Liberal Arts. Senior College Preparatory 33-34 

Liberal Arts. Terminal 43-44 

Liberal Arts, 3-Year Program 43-44 

Library 18-19 

Masquers 21 

Mathematics. Course Descriptions 65-66 

Mathematics. Senior College Preparatory 34 

Medical Technologists. Savannah School of 44 

Medical Technology. Senior College Preparatory 34 

Medical Technology, Terminal 44 

Music (See Glee Club) 21 

Music, Course Descriptions 66-67 

Night School (see Evening College) 22-24 

Nursing, 1-Year Program 44 

Organization of the College 13 

Orientation and Advisement 16 

Philosophy, Course Descriptions 66 

Physical Education Program 21 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 68 

Physical Education, Senior College Preparatory 35 

Physical Examination 25 

Physical Science, Course Descriptions 69 

Physics, Course Descriptions 68-69 

Physics. Senior College Preparatory 35 

Placement Service 20 

Placement Tests 25 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 71 

Pre-Dental, Senior College Preparatory 35-36 

Pre-Medical. Senior College Preparatory 36 

Pre-Nursing, Senior College Preparatory 36 



?-e*si^- /fU^TiS^f • US 

INDEX (Continued) 

Pre-Optometry, Senior College Preparatory 36-37 

Pre-Pharmacy, Senior College Preparatory 37 

Pre-Veterinary, Senior College Preparatory 37 

Psychology. Course Descriptions 71-72 

Publications 21 

Radio Work Shop (see Masquers) 21 

Recommendations 30 

Refunds 18 

Regulations — General 25-30 

Reports and Grades 26-27 

Requirements for Admission 14-1") 

Requirements for Graduation 29-30 

Scholarships 19-20 

Secretarial. 2-Year Program 41 

Senior College Courses 23-24 

Social Science, Contemporary Georgia 72 

Sociology, Course Descriptions 72-74 

Spanish, Course Descriptions 74 

Stenographic. 1-Year Program 42 

Student Activities 20 

Student Assistants 19 

Student Center 20 

Summer School Calendar 3-4 

Teaching. Senior College Preparatory 37-38 

Technical Institute. Course Descriptions: 

Building Construction 80 

Chemical 76-77 

Civil 81-82 

Electrical 82-85 

General 75 

Industrial 77-79 

Technical Institute Programs 22-23. 45-49 

Television Workshop (see Masquers) 21 

Transfer. Admission by 15 

Transfer to Other Institutions 31 

Transfer Students 15 

Transportation. Terminal Programs 41 

University of Georgia. Extension Courses 24. 86-87 

Warren A. Candler School of Nursing 44 

Withdrawal from College 28-29 

Withdrawal Schedule 18 

ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



1959-60 



tULLETIN 



ARMSTRONG 
COLLEGE 
OF 
SAVANNAH 







310.02, 

VX JWANNAH, GEORGIA 



1959-1960 



SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING 

BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 
Savannah, Georgia 



A Unit of the University System 
of Georgia 




1 8349 

Membership in 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XXIV NUMBER 1 

ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR 1959-1960 

SUMMER SESSION, 1959 

Last da^ to file Application foi Admission Friday, Ma) 15, 1 '<">'< 

Registration Friday, June 5, I :00 I'M to 8:00 I'M 

Monday, June 8. 1 :<)<) I'M to 8:00 I'M 

t lasses begin Wednesday, June 10, 1959 

Last da) to registei fo] credit Wednesday, June 10, 1959 

Mid-Term reports Friday, July 3, 1959 

Examinations Thursday and Friday, July 30th and 31st, 1959 

FALL QUARTER, 1959 

Lasl day to tile Application for Admission Tuesday, August 25. 1959 

Freshman testing and sophomore counseling Monday, September 14, 1959 

Freshman orientation and Day School registration Tuesday, September 15, 1959 
Registration Friday. September 18, 1959—1:00 PM to 8:00 PM 

Registration Monday. September 21, 1959—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 

Classes begin Monday, September 21, 1959 

Last day to register for credit Thursday, September 24, 1959 

Mid-Term reports due Friday, October 30, 1959 

Pre-registration for winter quarter (Mon. thru Wed.) November 16-18, 1959 

Thanksgiving holidays (Thurs. thru Sun.) November 26-29. 1959 

Examinations (Wed. thru Fri.) December 9-11, 1959 

HOMECOMING: 

Basketball game Saturday. December 5, 1959 

Reception and Dance Saturday, December 26. 1959 

Christmas holidays (Sat. thru Thurs.) December 12 - January 1, 1960 

REGISTRATION: 



Tuesday thru Thursday, September 15-17 — 9:00 AM to 1 

2 : 00 PM to 5 

Friday. September 18—1 : 00 PM to 8 

Monday thru Thursday. September 21-24 — 9:00 AM to 8 



00 PM 
00 PM 
00 PM 
00 PM 



WINTER QUARTER, 1960 

Last day to file Application for Admission Monday. December 14, 1959 

Registration Monday. January 4. 1960 — 9:00 AM to 1:00 PM 

and 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM 
Registration Tuesday. January 5. 1960—1 : 00 PM to 8 : 00 PM 

Registration Wednesday. January 6, 1960 

thru January 8. 1960—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 
Classes begin Wednesday. January 6. 1960 

Last day to register for credit Friday, January 8. 1960 

Mid-Term reports due Friday. February 5. 1960 

Pre-registration for spring quarter (Wed. thru Fri.) February 10-12 

Examinations (Mon. thru Wed.) March 14-16 

Spring holidays (Thurs. thru Sun.) March 17-20 



SPRIXC; QUARTER, I960 

Last da> to file Application for Admission Monday. February 29, 1960 

Registration Monday. March 21—9:00 AM to 1:00 PM and 

J: DO PM to 5:00 PM 

Tuesday March 22—1:00 PM to 8:00 PM 

Wednesday March 23—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 

Thursday March 24—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 

Friday March 25—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 

Classes begin Wednesday. March 23, 1960 

Last d;i\ to register for credit Friday. March 25, 1960 

Holiday Friday. April 15, 1960 

Mid-Term reports due Friday, April 22. 1960 

Pre-registration for summer and fall quarter 

Wednesday. Thursday. Friday. April 2 7-29. 1960 
Examinations Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Ma\ 30-31, June 1. 1960 

Graduation Wednesday. June 8. 1960 

SUMMER SESSION, 1960 



Last day to file Application for Admission 
Registration Monday. 

Tuesday. 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Mid-Term reports due 



Monday. May 23. 196Q 

June 13—1:00 to 8:00 PM 

June 14—1:00 to 8:00 PM 

Wednesday. June 15. 1960 

Wednesday. June 15, 1960 

Monday. July 11. 1960 



Examinations 



Thursday and Friday. August 4. 5. 1960 



Regents, University System of Georgia 

244 Washington Street, s w Fourth Plooi 

ATLAN l \ 

P: I rid R< gtnt Address 

State .a Large Mrs. William T. Healej Atlanta 

January 1. 1953 January 1. I960 
State at Large Allen Woodall Columbus 

February 13, 1957— January 1. 1964 
State at Large Freeman Strickland Atlanta 

January 1. 195 I January 1. I960 
State at Large Quimby Melton. Jr. Griffin 

February 14. 1956— January 1. 1963 
State at Lam«- Carey Williams Greensboro 

January 1. 1955 — January 1. 1962 
First — Everett Williams Statesboro 

January 13, 1955— January 1. 1962 
Second — John I. Spooner Donalsonville 

January 1. 1954— January 1. 1961 
Third — Howard H. Callaway Pine Mountain 

January 1. 1958— January 1. 1965 
Fourth — Robert O. Arnold Covington 

January 1, 1956 — January 1. 1963 
Fifth — David F. Rice Atlanta 

January 1, 1954 — January- 1. 1961 

Sixth — Linton D. Baggs. Jr. Macon 

July 8, 1957— January 1. 1964 

Seventh — Ernest L. Wright Rome 

February 6, 1959— January 1. 1966 

Eighth — James D. Gould Brunswick 

February 13, 1957— January 1. 1964 

Ninth — Morris M. Bryan, Jr Jefferson 

February 3, 1959— January 1. 1966 
Tenth — W. Roscoe Coleman Augusta 

January 1. 1958— January 1. 1965 



Officers of the Board of Regents 

Chairman Robert O. Arnold 

Vice-Chairman. Freeman Strickland 

Chancellor Harmon W. Caldwell 

Assistant to the Chancellor John E. Sims* 

Dir., Plant <2? Bus. Operations. J. H. Dewberry 

Executive Secretary L. R. Siebert 

Treasurer.. James A. Blissit 

Dir. of Testing <2? Guidance Dr. John R. Hills 



*On leave 



ARMSTRONG ( .( >LLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



The Armstrong College Commission 

The Commission controls certain endowment funds and scholar- 
ship funds which have been contributed by local citizens over a period 
of years. It serves also in an advisory capacity to the college. 

Herschel V. Jenkins Chairman 

Dr. Irving Victor Vice-Chairman 



Edward J. Bartli i i . 

Ex-Officio 
Jack E. Cay, Jr., 

Ex-Officio 
Dr. H. Y. Charbonnier 
H. Lee Fulton, Jr., 

Ex-Officio 
Joseph H. Harrison 



Victor B. Jenkins 
Herbert L. Kayton 
Leon McCormac, 

Ex-Officio 
W. Lee Mingledorff, Jr. 

Ex-Officio 
Dr. Helen A. Sharpley 



President's Office 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B. ; M.S. Presidt nt 

Marjorie A. Mosley, A. A. Administrative Assistant and 

Secretary to the President 

Evening College Office 

Mary H. Strong, A.B. Director of the Evening College 
Helen Meighen Secretary 



Business Office 



JULE C. ROSSITER, A. A. 

Sara Alice Williams 



Comptroller 
Clerical Assistant 



Registrar's Office 



Jack H. Padgett, A.B.. M.A. 

El I/ABETH O. HlTT 

Minnie McG. Campbell 
Jilia F. Remley 
Elizabeth Howard 



R, gistrar 

Assistant to the Registrar 

Veterans' Affairs Officer 

Clerical Assistant 

Clerical Assistant 



Admissions Office 



Jack H. Padoi i i. A.I',.. M.A. 
Xi i i ii. Han kins Schmidt, B.A. 



Director of Admissions 
Assistant to Director of Admissions 



ADMlMslRAI |( )\ 7 



Student Personnel Services 

M Lorraini Anchors, A.l'». M \ ( <>idniat<>> 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.li.. M.A. Psychologist 

I h \rii i 1 \ Ai i v retary 



Library 



Mi riii B. McCALLj A.B.j M.A. Librarian 

Ei i \ N. Clancy Assistant to the Librarian 

*Tkd Martin Assistant to the Librarian 



Other Personnel 



Angela McBrtoe P.B.X. Operator 

Mary Jean Tremonto P.B.X. Operator 

Elizabeth Pound Manager, Student Centei 

and Book Store 
Joe McNeely, Jr. Supt. of Grounds and Buildings 

The Faculty 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Graduate 
Study. Cambridge University 

Instructor in English 



:: Jane Bassett, B.S., Troy State Teachers College 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

\V. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

* Patricia Jacobson Bergrin, B.A., M.A., Hunter College 
Instructor in English 



Stephen P. Bond, B.S. in Architecture, Georgia Institute of 
Technology 

Instructor in Engineering D rawing 



William E. Covle. A.B., Emorv University: M.A., Georgetown 
University 

Instructor in History & Political Science 



*Part time. 



8 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Lamar W. Davis, B.S. and M.S., University of South Carolina; 
Certified Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

*Angkl Dkl Btsto, Artist's Diploma. Julliard School of Music; 
Mus. 1).. Zoellner Conservatory 

Instructor in Woodwind Instruments 

[osephin] Simmons Denmark. B.S., Georgia Teachers College; 
M.S.. in Home Economics, University of Georgia 
Instructor in Home Economics 

John L. M. des Islets,, Col. (Ret.), B.S.. United States Military 
Academy 

Instructor in Physics 

Rossiter C. Durfee, A.B. and M.A., Stanford University. 
Instructor in English and Director of the Masquers 

^Hartley Barrett Eckerson B.S., M.S., University of Tennessee 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Jack B. Fowler, A.B., University of Georgia; M.A., George Peabody 
College for Teachers 

Instructor in English 

^Theodore Henkle, Julliard School of Music. Pupil of Leopold Auer 

Instructor in Violin 

Daniel J. Hook, A.B., Newberry College; M.A., Columbia Univer- 
sity; Graduate Work, University of South Carolina and the Uni- 
versity of Kansas 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Essie D. Jenkins, Owensboro Business College. Kentucky 
Instructor in Typing 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.M., Converse College: A.B.. University 
of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University 

Instructor in French and English 

El mo M. McCrav, Jr., B.S. and M.S.. University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Hugh McTeer, A.B. and M.A. in Education. University of South 
( iarolina 

Instructor in History and Education 



♦Part time. 



\h\ll\ls I K A I K )\ 



Lewis Haoood Owen, A.B., Duke University 
Instructor in Chemistry 

*Thomas M. ParhaMj A.B., Emory University; M.S. in Social Work, 
I ni\ ei sit) of Tennessee 

Instructor in Sociology 

|. 1 1 \rr\ PerssEj B.F.A.3 University of Georgia; Master of Music, 
Floi ida M.ue University 

Instructor in Music and Faculty Advisor for Student Publications 

*Louis J. Poi ink. A.I).. Mercer University; M.A., New York Uni- 
versity; Graduate Study. Emory University 
Instructor in Psychology 

Norman Ray Remley, B.S.. University of Georgia; Graduate Study. 
University of Georgia 

Instructor in Psychology 

Nellie Hankins Schmidt, B.A., Mary Baldwin College; Graduate 
Study. University of Virginia. Smith College and Mt. Holyoke 
College 

Instructor in English 

Roy J. Sims, B.S., David Lipscomb College; M.S., University of Ten- 
nessee 
Instructor in Physical Education for Men and Basketball Coach 

Frank P. Sivik, B.S., Providence College; M.S., University of Massa- 
chusetts; Graduate Study. North Carolina State College 
Instructor in Botany and Biology 

Julia Floyd Smith, B.S. and M.A., Florida State University 
Instructor in Sociology and History 

Robert I. Strozier, A.B. and Graduate Study. University of Georgia; 
Graduate Study, Florida State University 

Instructor in English 

Nancy P. Summers, A.B., Bowling Green College of Commerce 
Instructor in Commerce 

Mary E. Thacker, A.B. and M.S., Emory University 
Instructor in Chemistry 



Part time. 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., North- 
western University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Western 
Reserve University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Louis A. Thompson, M.A., and LL.B.. University of Georgia; Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

William L. Travis, Col. (Ret.), B.S., United States Military Acad- 
emy; LL.B., George Washington School of Law 

Instructor in Physical Science and Engineering Drawing 
Elizabeth A. Tucker, B.S., University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women 

Anthony M. Warren, B.A. and Graduate Study. Tulane University 
Instructor in English 

William S. Winn, B.D. and A.B., Emory University: M.A.. University 
of North Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAM INSTRUCTORS FOR 

COURSES OFFERED AT UNION BAG-CAMP 

PAPER CORPORATION 

Ellis O. Barnes, B. Ch. E., University of Louisville 

C. Duncan Blake, B.S., Master of Forestry. Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 

John C. Bowers, B.S. in Ch. E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute: M.S. 
in Ch. E.j Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

George L. Brannen, B.S. in Industrial Engineeering, Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology 

Ivan H. Carr, Jr., B.S. in Industrial Engineering, University of Florida 

Ernest Clifton, B.S. in Mech. E., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Robert J. Cummings, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering, University 
of Florida; Master of Science in Engineering. University of Florida 

Robert W. Gray, Bachelor of Arts, Kings College 

Everett J. Harriman, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of 
Maine: M.S. in Pulp and Paper Technology, University of Maine 

James A. Henderson, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering, University 
of Florida 



ADMINISTRA I l< >\ 1 1 



Herman L. Letchworth, Journeyman Machinist, Methods and 
Machine 1 design 

[ames C. McKeEj Bacheloi of Forestry, Stephen F. Austin College; 
Mastei of Forestry, Duke University 

[ohn |. Ouin, Jr.. B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State 
Unh ersit) 

Creed 11. Reagan, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, University oi Ten- 
nessee 

David W. Ri in. B.S. in Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State 
University 

( \i\:\ S. s > Hi i ssmaNj B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Carnegie In- 
stitute of Technology 



The following is a resolution adopted by the Board 

of Regents at its meeting held in Atlanta, 

Georgia on March 12, 1958 

"RESOLVED, That the requirements for admission to the various 
institutions of the Universtiy System of Georgia be amended so that 
the following additional requirements must be met: 

1. Any resident of Georgia applying for admission to an insti- 
tution of the University System of Georgia shall be required 
to submit certificates from two citizens of Georgia, alumni of 
the institution that he desires to attend, on prescribed forms, 
which shall certify that each of such alumni is personally 
acquainted with the applicant and the extent of such acquaint- 
ance, that the applicant is of good moral character, bears a 
good reputation in the community in which he resides, and, 
in the opinion of such alumnus, is a fit and suitable person 
for admission to the institution and able to pursue successfully 
the courses of study offered by the institution he desires to 
attend. 

Provided, however, that any applicant who seeks admission to 
an institution with an enrollment less than 1000 students and 
who lives in a county in which no alumnus of the institution 
he wishes to attend resides, may furnish a certificate from the 
Judge of the Superior Court of his circuit in lieu of the 
certificate from alumni. In such a case the certificate of the 
Judge of the Superior Court shall set forth the same facts 
that the alumni certificate must contain in other cases. 
Each such applicant shall also submit a certificate from the 



12 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court of the county in 

which the applicant resides that such applicant is a bona fide 
resident of such county. Is oi good moral charactei and bears 
.i good reputation in the community in which lie resides. How- 
ever, any applicant who lives in a county having a population 
of 100,000 or more, may submit in lieu of the certificate from 
the Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court a certificate, on 
a prescribed form, from a third alumnus of the institution 
that applicant desires to attend. This third alumnus shall be 
one of those on a list of alumni designated by the president 
of the alumni association of the institution to assist the insti- 
tution in its efforts to select students of character, aptitude, 
and ability and to obtain corroborating evidence regarding the 
place of residence of such students. The certificate of the 
third alumnus in counties with a population of 100,000 or more 
shall set forth the facts required in the certificate from the 
Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court. 

2. Any non-resident of the State applying for admission to an 
institution of the University System of Georgia shall submit 
a similar certificate from two alumni of the institution that he 
desires to attend, or from two reputable citizens of the com- 
munity in which the applicant resides. Every such applicant 
shall also submit a certificate from a judge of a court of record 
of the county, parish, or other political sub-division of the 
State in which he resides that he is a bona fide resident of such 
county, parish, or other political sub-division and a person of 
good moral character and bears a good reputation in the com- 
munity in which he resides. 

3. There is reserved to every institution of the University System 
of Georgia the right to require any applicant for admission to 
take appropriate intelligence and aptitude tests in order that 
the institution may have information bearing on the appli- 
cant's ability to pursue successfully courses of study for which 
the applicant wishes to enroll and the right to reject any appli- 
cant who fails to satisfactorily meet such tests. 

4. There is reserved to every institution of the University System 
of Georgia the right to determine the sufficiency of any certifi- 
cate required by this resolution ; the right to determine whether 
any applicant has met the requirements for admission as set 
forth by this resolution, or otherwise, and is a fit and suitable 
person for admission to such institution. There is also reserved 
the right to reject the application of any person who has not 
been a bona fide resident of Georgia for more than twelve 
months. 



ADMINISTRATION l I 



It it shall appeal to the presidenl oi othei propei authority 
oi any institution of the University System of Georgia that the 
educational needs oi an) applicant lot admission to that insti- 
tution can best be met al some other institution of the Univer- 
sity System, he may refer tho application to the Board of 
Regents foi consideration, foi reference or assignment to such 

Othei institution. 

'This resolution shall become effective immediately and cata- 
logs of all institutions of the University System shall carry 
these requirements. Catalogs already printed shall cany inserts 
oi addenda showing these requirements. The foregoing require- 
ments shall apply to all applicants who have applied for ad- 
mission to any institution of the University System of Georgia, 
but have not been actually enrolled and admitted, and to all 
applicants who hereafter make application for admission to 
any such institution. 

All alumni, ordinaries and clerks of the superior courts, called 
upon or requested to execute certificates on behalf of appli- 
cants for admission to any institution under any paragraph 
as hereinbefore provided, shall, with respect to certifications as 
to good moral character, reputation, fitness and suitability for 
admission to the institution, and ability to pursue successfully 
the courses of study therein, be guided and controlled by the 
following standards : 

(a) Age of the applicant. 

(b) Past educational record, academic achievements, and 
overall scholastic ability of the applicant. 

(c) Temperament, demeanor and attitude of the applicant. 

(d) Any past criminal record of the applicant or other dis- 
ciplinary problems. 

(e) Sobriety. 

(f) Martial status, and all other similar obligations. 

(g) Financial ability of the applicant to successfully defray 
all school and living expenses. 

(h) Physical and mental fitness — any nervous or other phy- 
sical defects or disorders. 
(i) Any military service record of the applicant. 
(j) The general reputation of the applicant in the community 
in which he or she resides, as the same may be known 
to such alumnus, ordinary, or clerk, or as may be made 
known by recommendations or testimonials from persons 
known to such alumnus, ordinary or clerk to be reliable.'* 
This 28th day of October, 1958. 

s/s L. R. Siebert, Executive Secretary 
Regents of the University System 
of Georgia. 














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General Information 

History and Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on May 27, 1935, 
by the Mayoi and Aldermen of the Cit) of Savannah to meet .1 long- 
felt need for a junior college. The first college building was the 
magnificent home of the late George F. Armstrong, .1 gift to the city 

from his widow and his daughter. The former home, now called the 
Armstrong Building, is an imposing structure of Italian Rennaissance 

architecture: inside, its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air 
of dignit) : while outside it is one of the beautiful college buildings 
in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropria- 
tion, the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four addi- 
tional buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, 
prominent banker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are 
located the Student Center, the Home Economics Program, class- 
rooms and the Dancing Studio; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, which 
contains the auditorium and theater for the Armstrong College Mas- 
quers and classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most 
beatiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one 
of the carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, 
contains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia 
Historical Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college was under the administrative control of the Armstrong 
College Commission until January 1, 1959. On this date the institu- 
tion became a unit in the University System of Georgia and under 
the control of the State Board of Regents. 

Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community by giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet 
the obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student may complete one or more of the following spec it "ic 
objectives. 

1. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree; 



16 ARMSTRONG ( OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

2. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading 
toward medic inc. dentistry, law. home economics, the 
ministry and other professions; 
Graduate from a semi-professional program, pre- 
pared to go into business or industry; 

4. Complete two years of an engineering program which 
is transferable for credit to colleges of engineering; 

5. Complete a two-year technical institution program: 

6. Obtain two years of learning in fields that will enrich 
personal and social living. 

The college awards an associate degree to students completing 
an approved program. 

Admission to the College 

Scholastic & Personal Requirements 

An applicant planning to enter Armstrong College will obtain 
from the Director of Admissions an "Application for Admission" form. 
Completion of all application forms and of all requirements con- 
tained therein is required of each applicant before his request foi 
admission can be considered. No application forms will be considered 
unless received by the date prescribed in the calendar set forth on 
page 3. which is in each case at least twenty 20) days prior 
to the first day of registration. Armstrong College reserves the right 
to terminate receipt of application forms when enrollment limit 
reached. 

The applicant will request the high school principal, or the 
college registrar in the case of a transfer student) to send a trans- 
cript of credits to the Director of Admissions. Armstrong College of 
Savannah. Savannah, Georgia. 

The Director of Admissions will notify the applicant that he lias 
been admitted if he meets the minimum requirements for admission 
listed below . 

1. The applicant must be at least sixteen years of age and of 
established moral character. Armstrong College reserves the right to 
examine and investigate the moral worth, character, and personality 
of the applicant. 

2. The College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic- Apti- 
tude Test is required of all applicants for admission including those 
who have had previous college work. The results ot the tests must 
be filed with the Director of Admissions before the application can 
be considered. In order that the scores may be received in time for 
evaluation, the applicant is urged to follow the testing schedule below: 

For Summer Quarter, 1959 — take test on 
December 6. 1958. January 10. 1 
February 14, 1959 or March 14. 1959. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 



Foi Fall Quarter, l ( »j ( » take test on 
Decembei 6, L958 3 January 10, L959, 
February l I. L959, March 1 I. 1959 oi 
May 16, 1959. 

Foi Winter Quarter, 1960 — take test on 
May 16, 1959 or August 12. 1959. 

For Spring Quarter, 1960-take test on 
December 5. 1959 or January 9. 1960. 

The high school principal, counsellor, or the Director of Admis- 
sions of Armstrong College will supply the necessary information for 
making application to take the College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test; or the applicant may write directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 592, Princeton, New 
Jersey. Please note that application must be made to the College 
Entrance Examination Board one month prior to the testing dates 
listed above. 

3. The applicant must meet at least one of the following re- 
quirements: 

a. Graduation from an accredited high school. 

b. Have credit in a minimum of 15 units, as specified 
in Section 4, below, from an accredited high school. 

c. Acceptable scores on the General Educational De- 
velopment Tests (high school level). An applicant 
twenty years of age or over, who is not a graduate of 
an accredited high school, may take the General 
Educational Development Tests (high school level). 
These tests comprise five (5), two (2) hour exami- 
nations and must be completed two weeks prior to 
registration. Additional information may be obtained 
from the Office of the Director of Admissions. 

4. Applicants must meet the requirements in units as specified 
here : 

English 3 

^Mathematics 2 or 3 

Social Studies 2 

Natural Sciences 1 

Other academic units 4 

Others 3 or 2 



* As most senior colleges require two (2) units of Algebra and one (1) unit 
of Plane Geometry for admission to degree programs in Engineering and/or 
Science, students planning to enter these fields are strongly urged to present 
these three (3) units in mathematics for admission to Armstrong College. 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Beginning with the Fall quarter of I960, a minimum of 16 units 
from .in accredited hii^h school will be required in the fields listed 
below : 

English 4 

*Mathemati< s 2 or 3 One must be in Algebra) 

Social Studies 2 

Natural Sciences 2 

Other academic units 4 

Other 2 or 1 

Armstrong College reserves the right to reject the credits from 
any high school or other institution notwithstanding its accredited 
status, where the college determines either from investigation or other- 
wist. that the quality instruction available at such high school or 
institution is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. 

5. Applicants who qualify under the terms of Numbers 3 and 4 
above must also have a predicted grade point average ( based on high 
school record. College Entrance Examination Board scores, and other 
pertinent data as determined by the Admissions Committee of Arm- 
strong College) which indicates that the applicant has the potential 
to pursue effectively the educational program of Armstrong College. 

6. If the application forms, College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, and properly transmitted records of 
the applicant are found to be complete and in proper order and the 
grades and scores indicate that the candidate is eligible for considera- 
tion, the applicant will be informed that his application for admis- 
sion has been tentatively accepted. 

He will then be directed by the Admissions Officer to appear 
at Armstrong College for personal testing and interview. Appoint- 
ments will be made as soon as possible after his application for ad- 
mission has been tentatively accepted. Testing and interview must 
be completed prior to the first day of Orientation Week or prior to 
the first day of Registration, whichever is the earlier date. Appli- 
cants are urged to take advantage of the earliest date for testing and 
interview as final acceptance cannot be given until this process is 
completed. 

At this time, every applicant will be evaluated in terms of his 
test scores and grades, scholastic aptitude, social and psychological 
adjustment, and the probability of his completing the requirements 
for a college degree. 

In reviewing the application, the interviewing representative ot 
Armstrong College shall consider all examination scores, scholastic 



As most senior colleges require two (2) units of Algebra and one (1) unit 
of Plane Geometry for admission to degree programs in Engineering and/or 
S. ience, students planning to enter these fields are strongly urged to present 
these three (3) units in mathematics for admission to Armstrong College. 



GENERAL INFORMA1 [ON l'» 



records, personal data, and tin- applicant's ability to make the social 
and psychological adjustment to the college environment. Each appli- 
cant must give evidence oi sturdiness ol character, promise oi growth, 
seriousness ol purpose, and a sense of social responsibility. Armstrong 
College reserves the right, in every case, to reject any applicant whose 
genera] records and attitude do not prognosticate success in Armstrong 
College notwithstanding the completion of other requirements. Arm- 
strong College reserves the right further to test any applicant ex- 
tensively by the use of psychological, achievement and aptitude tests. 

7. The Admissions Committee shall review any application di- 
rected to them by the Director of Admissions for total study and sub- 
sequent recommendation to the Director of Admissions. 

8. Acceptance or rejection of each and every application will 
be determined by the Director of Admissions, subject to the right of 
appeal as provided in the Faculty Statutes of Armstrong College and 
the by-laws of the Board of Regents of the University System. 

9. APPLICATION FORM DEPOSIT: A validating deposit of 
$15.00 must accompany each complete application form before it can 
be given official consideration. This deposit does not bind Armstrong 
College to admit the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the 
applicant's qualifications. If the applicant is admitted, the deposit 
will be applied towards tuition for the quarter following acceptance. 
The deposit will be refunded to the applicant if he is not eligible 
for admission. If the applicant wishes to withdraw his application, 
the deposit will be refunded if the applicant does not register and if 
the refund is requested in writing twenty (20) days prior to the first 
day of registration. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

1. Students who desire to transfer to Armstrong College from 
another college-level institution will be required to present scores of 
the College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test 
and will be required to obtain acceptable scores on standardized 
aptitude and/or achievement tests prior to admission. Armstrong 
College will designate the standardized tests required of an individual 
in accordance with the level of college at which the transfer is being 
made and the program which the applicant desires to enter. In every 
other respect transfer students must qualify as, and must comply with, 
the admissions requirements of, entering freshmen. 

Transfer students whose applications for admission have been 
tentatively accepted will be expected to appear for personal testing 
and interviews on dates specified by the Director of Admissions. 
Testing and interviews must be completed prior to the first day of 
Orientation Week or prior to the first day of registration, whichever 
is the earlier date. Applicants are urged to take advantage of the 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

earliest date foi testing and interview as final acceptance cannot be 
given until this process is completed. 

2. Transfei students should refer to the foregoing information 
relative to the admissions procedures, requirements, and dates for 
filing the completed application with the Office of the Director of 
Admissions. 

3. Transfei applicants must comply with the policy of the Board 
of Regents in furnishing the certificate found in the official appli- 
cation for admission form. 

4. The applicant must request that official transcripts showing 
evidence of studies pursued at all other colleges or universities be 
sent to the Director of Admissions. These transcripts must furnish 
a statement of honorable dismissal. Completion of ALL application 
forms is required of each applicant for admission by transfer from 
other institutions before his request for admission can be considered. 
It should be understood that only those applicants will be admitted 
whose past records indicate a favorable prospect of successful study 
with the faculty and with the other students in college. Every transfer 
student seeking admission will be evaluated for aptitude, achieve- 
ment, motivation, social and psychological adjustment, scholastic per- 
formance and probability of completing the requirements for a degree. 

5. Armstrong College reserves the right to deny admission to 
any student transferring to Armstrong College when, in the opinion 
of the Director of Admissions, the academic standards or the admis- 
sion procedures of the institution i s ) previously attended are not 
equivalent or comparable to those existing at Armstrong College. 

6. When a transfer applicant's qualifications are in question, 
the Director of Admissions, at his discretion, will refer the application 
in totality to the Admissions Committee for their review and recom- 
mendations. However, the final determination of the applicant's 
eligibility for admission to the College will be made by the Director 
of Admissions. 

7. Acceptance or rejection of each and every application will 
be determined by the Director of Admissions, subject to the right of 
appeal as provided in the by-laws of the Board of Regents of the 
University System. 

8. APPLICATION FORM DEPOSIT: A validating deposit of 
$15.00 must accompany each completed application form before it 
can be given official consideration. This deposit does not bind Arm- 
strong College to admit the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance 
of the applicant's qualifications. If the applicant is admitted, the 
deposit will be applied towards tuition for the quarter following 
acceptance. The deposit will be refunded to the applicant if he is not 
eligible for admission. If the applicant wishes to withdraw his appli- 
cation, the deposit will be refunded if the applicant does not register 



GENERAL INFORM A I ION 21 

and if the refund is requested in writing twenty 20 days prioi to the 
first day of registration. 

9 rhe amount of academic credit that Armstrong College will 
allow tot work done in another institution within a given period oi 
time ma\ not exceed the normal amount of credit that could have 
been earned at Armstrong College during that time. A maximum <>t 
sixty 60 academic quarter hours from an accredited college may 
be applied in the program foi which the applicant desires to enroll. 

10. Courses transferred for credit from othei colleges or univer- 
sities must have an oxer-all average of "C" grade. Under no cir- 
cumstances will credit be allowed lor courses in freshman English 
unless the grades received are "C" or better. College credit will not 
be allowed for such courses as remedial English and remedial mathe- 
matics or courses basically of secondary school level. 

11. Credit for specific courses designated as "core curriculum" 
or 'major" courses will not be allowed unless grades received are ( 
or above. 

12. It is the policy of the Board of Regents that the total numbei 
of hours that may be earned toward an associate degree by extension 
courses shall not exceed 22/2 quarter hours. 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Develop- 
ment tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do 
college work. A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA Form 
No. 7-1993) is required of every veteran who attends this institution 
under Public Law 550 'Korean Bill), application for which may be 
completed at the Veterans Administration office at 300 Drayton 
street. Savannah. Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificates 
from the Veterans Adminstration, the student should contact the 
Armstrong College Veterans Office regarding processing of certificate 
and future monthly reports. All veterans attending Armstrong under 
Public Law 550 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at time of 
registration. 

Orientation and Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the student's 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when 
the difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the adviser is usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits 



22 AkMs I RONG ( OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems 
which do not fit into these general categories, either because of 
greatei intensity oi critical developments, are referable to community 

agencies outside the college if this is agreeable to the student and 
liis parents or guardians. 

The academic advisement of students is distributed among the 
entire faculty so that each instructor carries the responsibility for a 
proportionate number of the entire student body registered in the day 
program. Advisement interviews are scheduled with each student 
at least once a quarter and appointments for these interviews are 
mailed from the office of the Registrar. These interviews are designed 
to aid the student in planning his program of work in college. 

Student Personnel Services 

In the fall of 1957 the office of Student Personnel Services was 
added to the advisement program discussed above. The services avail- 
able are as follows: individual diagnostic tests for students of high 
ability and low performance: vocational aptitude tests on an individual 
basis; and short-time counseling with students whose difficulties in 
adjusting to college life, either academic or social, require help be- 
yond that which may be given by advisors and instructors. 

Student Personnel Services also attempts to help the student to 
chose a senior college and to plan his program according to require- 
ments of the senior college. Information concerning scholarships 
may be obtained through this office. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this time 
an associate degree is awarded to those students who have met the 
requirements for graduation, and recognition is given to those who 
qualify for scholastic honors. The faculty and graduates participate 
in full academic dress. 

FEES 

Application Deposit 

The Application Deposit of SI 5.00 is made by all students at 
the time of initial application for admission to Armstrong College. 
This fee is applied as a credit against registration fees, if registration 
is completed the quarter following acceptance; otherwise, not refund- 
able. The acceptance of the Application Deposit does not constitute 
acceptance of student. If applicant wishes to withdraw application 
tot admission, complete refund will be made provided written request 
is received twenty days prior to official registration date of the 



GENERAL INK >RMA HON J I 



quartei following acceptance. The Application Deposit will be re- 
funded to the applicant it h<' is not eligible foi admission. 

Matriculation Fee 

The Marticulation Fee for students registering foi the normal 
course load oi fifteen hours is $33.00. Special students those carrying 
less than 12 credit hours in a quarter will pay at the rate oi $3.00 pei 
quarter hour in Matriculation Fee. 

Out of State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $50.00 per quarter 
in addition to all regular fees. Special students those carrying less 
than 12 credit hours in a quarter) who are not legal resident- <>! 
the state of Georgia will pay at the rate of $4.00 per quarter hour 
Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 

Student Activity Fee 

There will be a Student Activity Fee of $10.00 per quarter. 
This fee is not refundable. Student Activity Fee will be charged to 
any Day Student who has registered for ten or more quarter hours. 
Xo charge will be made to Evening College Students. 

Late Registration Fee 

Five days will be allowed for completion of registration. A late 
registration fee of $3.00 will be charged on the fourth day of regis- 
tration and a late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged on the 
fifth day of registration. This fee is not refundable. 

Change of Schedule Fee 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made 
if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 

Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
jm\ a special fee. The fees are indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make up 
an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to make 
up the announced test must be made within one week after the stu- 
dent returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 
one student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged as follows: The student was absent 
1 on official college business; (2) due to illness: (3) because of 
death in the family: or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 

Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 33.00 

Student Activity, per quarter... 10.00 



TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS $ 43.00 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter 50.00 



TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $ 93.00 

Matriculation. Special Students, per quarter hour 3.00 
Non-Resident Tuition. Special Students, per quarter 

hour in addition to Matriculation Fee). 4.00 

Application Deposit I paid only once, applied against fees) 15.00 

Privilege Fees 

Late Registration — Maximum 4.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation 7.50 

Transcript, first one tree, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 



GENERAL INFORMA1 h )\ 



Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application foi 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
.1 course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund <>! 80', of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 
ing the period between one and two weeks aftei the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60' , of the tecs paid for thai 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks aftei the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of M)' < of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who fonnalK 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks alter the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20 r r of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
lout weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change 
at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up. and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Library 

The college library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson 
Hall on the corner of Whitaker and West Gaston Streets. All the 
materials are readily available to the students since all books are on 
open shelves. On the main floor is the reference room which contains 
reference books, non-fiction books, biography, and the reserve and 
circulation desk. Downstairs is another reading room, containing fic- 
tion, books in foreign languages, current and bound volumes of 
periodicals, and the career information. The workroom and the office 
of the Librarian are also downstairs. 

At the present time the library collection consists of 15.000 vol- 
umes as well as a large number of pamphlets on subjects of current 
interest. More than one hundred periodicals are received, including 
four newspapers. Besides the books, periodicals and pamphlets, the 
library has a collection of recordings and a phonograph located in the 
downstairs reading room for the use of the students, faculty and staff. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historcial Society, also 
housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains an outstanding collec- 



26 ARMSTRONG I OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

tion of materials on Georgia and its histm\ as well as a large collection 
of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the Historical So- 
ciety consist of more than ten thousand books, eighty periodical sub- 
scriptions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of the more 
complete files of the Savannah newspapers, dating back to 1763. 

Audio Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, for- 
eign languages and music, visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is in- 
terested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application forms may be secured in the President's office in the Arm- 
strong Building. Those who wish to apply for a scholarship for the 
school year beginning in September should file an application in the 
President's office not later than July 15. All applicants are required 
to appear before an oral interview board during the month of August. 
Each applicant is notified in writing when to appear for his interview. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF WOMEN ACCOUNTANTS — 1 

is offered each year. Value: S100.00. Women only are eligbile . This 
scholarship is awarded to a woman student of one of the local high 
schools who is planning to major in accounting. 

ARTHUR LUCAS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS— 5 are of- 
fered each year. Value: $100.00 each. Both men and women are 
eligible . 

JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE— 2 are offered each 
year. Value $200.00 each. Both men and women are eligible . 
One scholarship is awarded to a sophomore and one to a freshman. 

EDWARD McGUTRE GORDON MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP—I is offered each year. Value: $200.00. Men only are eligi- 
ble . Applicants must be residents of Chatham County. 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY— 3 are offered each year. Value: 
$150.00 each. (Both men and women are eligible . These scholar- 
ships are awarded to students in the day school only. 






GENERAL INFORMA I U >\ 27 



HUNTER FIELD OFFICERS' WIVES' CLUB 2 are offered 
each year. Value: $100.00 ea( h. Both men and women are eligible 

PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION OF SAVANNAH 1 is of- 
fered each year. Value: $100. 00. Women <>nl\ are eligible 

HARRY (i. STRACHAN, III MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
1 is offered foi the school year 1959-1960. Value: $100.00. Both 
men and women are eligible) . 

Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit ol em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place 
his name on file with the Business Office. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Stu- 
dent Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and 
provides light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides 
recreational facilities and houses the book store. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 

The governing body for student affairs at Armstrong College is 
the Student Senate. This organization is made up of elected repre- 
sentatives from all student groups recognized by the Senate. It is the 
function and responsibility of the Senate to coordinate, direct and 
control student organizations and activities at Armstrong. 

Athletics 

Armstrong participates on the inter-collegiate level in basketball. 
golf, and tennis. All other sports at the college are on an intramural 
basis. Intramural competition is offered in such sports as basketball, 
volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, golf, softball and ping-pong. 
All are encouraged to take part in this program. 

Physical Education Program 

All regular day students are required to participate in a physical 
education program. Courses are offered each quarter except during 
the summer. These are listed elsewhere in the catalog under "Course 



28 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Descriptions." See 'General Regulations" for specific information 
concerning requirements of the program. 

Publications 

There are two student publications at Armstrong, the Inkwell, a 
newspaper, and the 'Geechee, the college annual. These afford the stu- 
dents an opportunity to express themselves through creative writing 
and art work, and to gain experience in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950, after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was re- 
organized as the Little Theatre, Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in ana- 
phase of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up, costuming, 
and other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio and Tele- 
vision Workshop, formed to offer interested students an opportunity 
to develop techniques of radio and television broadcasting. 

The Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who enjoy 
singing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from group singing. 
Besides two yearly concerts at the college, the Glee Club has produced 
musicals with the Armstrong Masquers and sung for many civic 
groups in Savannah. 

Armstrong Evening College 

Armstrong Evening College, as successor of the Savannah Branch 
of the University of Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation 
in June 1951. Fully accredited college classes are offered after 5:30 
p.m., Monday through Friday. Classes meet one. two or three eve- 
ings a week according to the amount of credit the course offers and 
its duration. 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non- 
credit basis. 



GENERAL INFORM. VI K )N 



The dates for refunds in the case ol withdrawal listed elsewhere 
in this Bulletin arc applicable. When .1 student is enrolled in more 
than out' course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. 
Refunds are made onl) in case of withdrawal from the college. 

'The cost of tuition, etc.. is covered undei "Fees." Student activity 

fees are not assessed evening college students unless they wish to par- 
ticipate in the regular activity program of the college. 

Qualified Armed Service personnel, currently on active duty, 
may have their tuition partially defrayed b) the services. This is 
arranged through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of Evening College courses, instructors, 
etc. may be obtained by addressing requests to the Director, Arm- 
strong Evening College. P. O. Box 1913. Savannah. Georgia. 

Students employed during the day are advised to limit their 
enrollment to one or two courses. A student planning to graduate 
should follow one of the programs of study listed elsewhere in this 
Bulletin under "Curriculums." The Director of the Evening College 
and members of the staff are available to assist students in planning 
their programs. 

The Technical Institute Programs 

Six programs leading to the degree of Associate in Science are 
offered by the Armstrong Evening College. These are two year termi- 
nal programs which qualify the student as a technician in his chosen 
field. Curriculums are available in the following technologies: Build- 
ing Construction, Civil and Electronic. In addition three other pro- 
grams are offered in cooperation with the Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corporation in Chemical, Industrial and Mechanical technologies. In 
these three fields the basic courses are taught at Armstrong College by 
the college staff. The advanced technical courses are conducted at the 
plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation by fully qualified 
company personnel. Excellent shop, laboratory and classroom facili- 
ties are available. These courses are fully accredited by Armstrong 
College and are not restricted to employees of the company. 

Tuition for Technical Institute courses taught at Armstrong Col- 
lege is the same as for other Evening College courses. Tuition for the 
courses conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper plant is $1.00 per 
credit hour, payable to Armstrong College. 

Classes are scheduled whenever possible with duplicate or extra 
sessions to accommodate shift workers with rotating work hours. 

Programs of study and course descriptions in the Technical Insti- 
tute program will be found elsewhere in this bulletin. 



ARMSTRONG COLLECT OF S.W'ANNAIl 



Senior College Courses 

A limited number of upper division courses are offered through 
the Extension Division of the University of Georgia. Instructors in 
these courses are approved by the heads of the departments at the 
University of Georgia. The courses carry University of Georgia credil 
and the uncles are recorded in the Registrar's Office at the University 
of Georgia. 

Fees for Extension courses are $5.00 per quarter hour. A registra- 
tion fee of $1.00 is also charged. Registration for Extension courses 
is handled by representatives of the Extension Division entirely sepa- 
rate from Armstrong registration. 



General Regulations 

Advisement and Placement Tests 

l<> help a student select .1 definite objective early in his college 

program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman a 

series of interest and achievement tests. In the fall, these are given dur- 
ing Freshman Week and are scored prior to the student's interview 
with an adviser. On the basis of these objective measurements, the 
student's previous record, his interest and his family counsel, the stu- 
dent with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of study which 
will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examinations 

Each day student must submit a completed physical examination 
report on the forms furnished by the college before he can complete 
his registration. On the basis of the examination, the physical educa- 
tion director will adapt a program of training and recreation to indi- 
vidual requirements. This regulation is not applicable to students 
enrolled in the Evening College. 

Physical Education Program 

All regular day students who are candidates for diplomas or 
certificates are required to attain credit for six physical education 
courses, one each quarter. A student graduating in less than six 
quarters may reduce the physical education requirements accordingly. 
Regular courses should be taken in proper sequence and two required 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 

A student who has served a minimum of three months in the 
military services shall be exempt from Physical Education 11. A 
student who has served a minimum of six months in the military 
services shall be exempt from Physical Education 11 and 12. Proof 
of service time shall be presented. 

In order for a regular day student to be excused from any one 
physical education course, he must have his or her doctor sign a spe- 
cial form. A student who does not plan to graduate from Armstrong 
College will be allowed to register for any one quarter without physi- 
cal education providing he or she signs the proper form. No student 
may register without a required physical education course except with 
written permission from the Physical Education Department. 

The physical education department requires all students to make 
up all excused absences. Any unexcused absence from class will re- 
sult in a lower final grade. 



:>2 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Course Load 

The unit of work foi .1 regular student is 16-17 quarter houis pei 
quarter. A schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that the 
average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per week 
to his college (lasses and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements 
for graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 
21 hours in any one quarter. 

No student will be allowed to take more than 1 1 quarter hours 
of work in the Evening College during the fall, winter and spring 
quarters unless he has better than a *'B'' average in the last quarter 
for which grades are available. A student will be limited to 6 quarter 
hours during any one term of the summer unless he has better than 
a "B" average in the last quarter of work for which grades are avail- 
able. The limitations in the two preceding sentences apply only to 
students who are full-time employed. All entering students and 
students with full-time employment are limited to 1 1 quarter hours 
of work in the fall, winter and spring quarters; and to 6 quarter 
hours of work during any one term of the summer session. This 
regulation does not apply to transient students who are regularly 
enrolled in another institution. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registra- 
tion and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Regents 
of University System of Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and 
the use on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the administration and faculty that students in col- 
lege should be held accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly. 
report cards, warnings of deficient scholarship and all such notices 
.ue not sent to parents or guardians by the Registrar except on 
request. Instead the students themselves receive these reports and 
are expected to contact their advisers whenever their work is un- 



( ,1 NERAL REG1 LA I K >NS 



A plus 


95-100 


l.\. eptional 


A 


90- 94 


Ex< ellent 


B 


80- 89 


Good 


C 


70- 79 


Fail 


D 


60- 69 


Poor 


E 




Incomplete 


F 




Failure 


w 




Withdrew 


W/F 




Withdrew Failing 



satisfactory. Report cards are issued .it the end ol each quarter. 
Reports of failing grades are issued in the middle of each quarter. 
Each student has access to an adviser; in addition, tin- Registrai and 
all instructors are available to help an) student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system ol grading: 

1 honor points pel quartet hoin 
3 honor points per quarter hour 

2 honoi points pei quartei houi 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
Xo honor points per quarter hour 
Incomplete must be removed before 

mid term of the following quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade) should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements 
of the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the 
middle of the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". 

Any student in the Evening College who is unable to remove 
a grade of "E" because of absence due to military service or condi- 
tions of employment, may appeal to the Academic Standing Com- 
mittee for a waiver of this regulation. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load (not less than fifteen hours per quarter), 
and achieving an average grade of U B" or better with no grade be- 
low that of "C" will be placed on the Permanent Dean's list. This 
list is published each June in the commencement program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 
with highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with dis- 
tinction) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above require- 
ments with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be selected by the graduating class from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a grade of "B" or bet- 
ter in each course during any quarter will be placed on the Dean's 
Scholastic Attainment List. 

Students in the Evening College enrolled for ten or more hours, 
who earn 15 consecutive quarter hours of credit with grades of *B" or 



ARMSTRONG ( OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

bettei in each course will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attain- 
ment List. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence. 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A day student who has been absent from class for a valid reason 
should have the absence excused with a written statement to his in- 
structor who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the 
Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from 
the date the student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not 
be excused. Evening College students must leave excuses for absence 
in the Evening College office on a special form provided for that 
purpose. 

Any student whose absences for any cause exceed one third of 
the number of times the class meets in the quarter will be dropped 
from the class. The student will be given a "W" if at the time he 
was dropped he had a passing grade; if at the time he was dropped 
he was failing, he will be given a "WF". 

The above regulation is waived only in those cases approved by 
the academic standing committee. 

Any student who has unexcused absences equal in number to 
the times the class meets in one week, and has one additional unex- 
cused absence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will 
notify the Registrar's office when a student should be dropped. The 
Registrar's office will notify the student. Grades assigned to those 
who have been dropped will be either W or W/F. A student who is 
dropped within three weeks after the beginning of the quarter will 
automatically receive a grade of W. A student who is dropped after 
the 3rd week of the quarter will receive either a W or a W/F de- 
pending upon his status at time the student withdraws or is dropped 
from class. 

Students will be charged with absences incurred by late registra- 
tion in the college as indicated in the current bulletin and these ab- 
sences carry the same penalty as the other absences from a course. 

Attendance at monthly assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such intentions known to the administration of the college in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

A student should formally withdraw from any class which he 
discontinues by securing the written approval of the instructor and 



GENERAL REG! LA IK >NS 

his faculty adviser. This written approval should be filed in the 
Registrar's office. Grades assigned to those who withdraw will be 
eithei W oi W/F. A student who withdraws within three weeks 
after the beginning of the quarter will automatically receive a grade 

ol" W. A student who withdraws after the 3rd week of the quaitei 

will receive a W or W F depending upon his status at the time the 

student withdraws or is dropped from class. 

Dismissal 

An\ day student failing except in cases excused before examina- 
tions on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than 
physical education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls 
of the college. Any student who fails to make an average of at least 
0.6 honor points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the 
first three quarters work at the college will not be allowed to re- 
register. Withdrawal is recommended to all students who have less 
than a "C" average at the end of the fourth quarter. At the end of 
the sixth quarter's work a student must have an 0.8 honor point per 
quarter hour average in order to re-register. 

Any student in the evening program seeking credit who fails (ex- 
cept when excused before final examination on account of illness) to 
pass at least one course with a recorded grade of "D" or better in 
two consecutive quarters will be dropped from the rolls of the college. 
Any student in the evening program who fails to make an average 
of at least 0.6 honor points per quarter hour in the first 50 quarter 
hours of work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. With- 
drawal is recommended to all students who have less than a "C" 
average at the end of 70 quarter hours of work. At the end of 90 
quarter hours of work, a student must have an average of 0.8 honor 
points per quarter hour in order to re-register. 

Students who have been asked to withdraw on account of aca- 
demic deficiency will be re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes 
to another college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If 
a student does not go to another college he may re-register at Arm- 
strong College after two quarters. He re-enters on probation for 
one quarter, during which quarter he must make a "C" average. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of 
Savannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed else- 
where in the catalog under "Curriculums'' with an average 
grade of "C". Any exceptions to a program may be re- 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



ferred l>\ a student's advise] to the Committee on Academic 
Standing. 

2. One-third of the work required foi graduation will be com- 
pleted at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. Examination on the Constitutions. Examinations on the Con- 
stitution of the United States and that of the State of Geor- 
gia, required of all persons receiving a degree from the Col- 
lege unless exempted 1>\ credit in Political Science 13, will be 
given at times to be announced. 

Examination on United States and Georgia History. Exami- 
nations on the history of the United States and of Georgia 
are required of all persons receiving a degree from the Col- 
lege unless exempted by credit in History 100. The examina- 
tions will be given at times to be announced. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Regis- 
trar's office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and 
other agencies having access to confidential records. A good college 
record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curricula 



General 

Before registration, the student should PLAN A PROGRAM I >I 

STUDY Willi AN ADVISER. Even if a student knows what 
courses are required foi graduation, he should have on record in the 
office of his adviser a copy of his program. In order Tor a student 
to make any changes in his planned program he must consult his 
adviser. The adviser and the Registrar will check a student's pro- 
mam and it will be approved two quarters prior to the expected 
date of graduation. 

An associate degree is conferred upon all students who success- 
fully complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the two-yeai 
programs. 

If a student plans to transfer to another institution either before 
or after graduation, it is essential that he determine what courses 
must be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree 
requirement of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 

The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indis- 
pensable to every college trained man and woman. The understand- 
ing of one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful 
ends, the ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings, right 
group-attitudes and coordinated physical activity — these objectives 
are set up in the following courses required of all students desiring 
to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 14. 15: History. 14. 15: ten quarter 
hours of natural sciences**, and Physical Education 11. 12. 13. With 
permission of instructor, students may substitute Physical Education 
14 for Physical Education 12 and Physical Education 23 for Physical 
Education 13. 

Students enrolled in one year programs may choose any three 
of the required physical education* courses as listed for freshmen and 
sophomores. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of physi- 
cal education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses described 
below may substitute English 28 for one of the required English 
courses. 

A student mav choose anv three of the following phvsical educa- 
tion courses: 21. 23. 25. 26. 27, 28. 31. 



*Physical Education is not required of Evening College students. 
**Xatural sciences include biology, chemistry, physics, human biology, and 
physical science. 



38 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 

SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
PROGRAMS 



(1) Business Administration* 



First Year 

, 15 — Freshman 



Second Year 



Western 



English 14 

English 
History 14. 15 

Civilization 
Physical Education 1 
Laboratory Science 
Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 
Mathematics 19 — Finance 5 

Electives 5 



12. 13 



English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Business Administration 24. 25 — 

Accounting 10 

Economics 21. 24 — Principles 

and Problems 10 

Political Science 13 — Gov't of 

U. S 5 

Electives 10 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 



48 



(2) Engineering 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The student should obtain a catalog from the senior 
college he plans to attend and check this program against the require- 
ments. The courses required for the freshman year have been worked 
out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 

English 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Chemistry 11. 12— General 10 

Mathematics 16. 17. 20 — College 

Aluebra. Trigonometry and 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 15 
Chemistry 13 — Qualitative 

Analysis 5 

Engineering 11. 12 — Drawing 4 

Engineering 19 — Descriptive 

Geometrv 2 



Second Year 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 



History 14. 15 
Physical Education 
Mathematics 21. 22. 23— 
Calculus 



10** 
3 

15 



Physics 21. 22. 23 18 

Political Science 13 5 1 



TOTAL 



56 



TOTAL 



49 



* A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for 
required subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this 
coin i 

*!> quarters of a foreign language may be taken in lieu of the social sciences. 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



19 



(3) Forestry 



A one-yeai program for students in Forestry. The student should 

obtain .1 catalog from the senior college \\r plans to attend and check 
this program against the requirements. 

English II. 15 Freshman 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 ..... 3 

Biology 11. 12 Botany 10 

Economics 21 Principles 5 

Engineering 11 — Drawing 1 

Mathematics 16, 17 — College Algebra and Trigonometry 10 

Physics 1-1 or Physical Science 11 5 

Political Science la Government of U. S. 5 



TOTAL 



50 



(4) Home Economics 
First Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman 

English 10 

History 14. 15 — History of 

Western Civilization 10 



Physical Education 11, 12, 13.... 

Art 11 — Creative Art 

Home Economics 10 — 

Orientation: 

Careers & Personal Development 
Home Economics 11 — Clothing... 
Laboratory Science 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

English 21, 22— Sophomore 

English 
Physical Education 
Home Economics 12 — Family 

Meal Planning and Serving 
Home Economics 21 — Home 

Planning and Decorating 
Home Economics 24 — Family 

Fundamentals 
Social Studies 

Electives 

Mathematics 9 or 16 

TOTAL 



10 

3 

5 
5 
5 

m 

5 
5 



48 



(5) Industrial Management 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman 

English 10 

History 14 — Western Civilization 5 

Phvsical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Chemistry 11. 12— General 10 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative 

Analysis 5 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 4 

Engineering 19 — Descriptive 

Geometry 2 

Mathematics 16, 17, 20— College 

Algebra. Trigonometry and 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus 15 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

History 15 — Western Civilization 5 
Business Administration 24, 25 — 

Principles of Accounting 10 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles 

and Problems 10 

Mathematics 19 — Mathematics of 

Finance 5 

Physics 14. 15. 16— 

General Physics 15 



TOTAL 



58 



TOTAL 54 



40 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



(6) Liberal Arts 



This program is recommended for candidates for the A.B. de- 
gree, pre-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism] and other 
pre-professional concentrations. 

First Year Second Year 



English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14, 15 Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education IF 12. 13 3 

Laboratory Science . 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

*Foreign Language 10 



TOTAL 



53 



English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English .... 10 

Physical Education 3 

*Scicnce 10 

Two of the following courses 10 

History 25 — Recent European 
Political Science 13 — Govt, of 

U.S. 
Psychology 21a — Introductory 
Sociology 20a — Introductory 
Economics 21 — Principles 
Philosophy 10 — Introductory- 
Electives 10 



TOTAL 



43 



(7) Mathematics 



A course designed for those students who wish to major in mathe- 
matics. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14. 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 
Chemistry or Biology . 10 
Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 
Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 
Mathematics 20 — Analytic Geom- 
etry and Calculus 5 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English ........ 10 

Physical Education . 3 
Phvsics 14. 15. 16 

21, 22. 23 . 10 

Electives .. 25 



TOTAL 



48 



TOTAL 



48 



(8) Medical Technology 



This program is designed for those students 
their first two years toward a Bacheloi 



ho w ish 



of Science degree in 



to obtain 
Medical 



h A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of his adviser, 
substitute other courses required by the senior institution during the first two 
vears. 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 11 

Technology. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion oi the academic program described below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 11. 15 Freshman English 10 English 21, 22 Sophomore 

Biology 11. 15 General Zoology 10 English 10 

Mathematics 16, 17 Algebra Biology 23 — Comparative 

and Trigonometry 10 Anatomj 6 

Chemistry 11. 12. 13— History 11. 15 Western 

Genera] Chemistry 15 Civilization Hi 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 French or German 11, 12 .10 

Electives .... 10 

TOTAL 48 Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 49 



(38) Music 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 

History 14. 15 — Western Civilization 10 

Physical Education 3 

Applied Music 6 

Music 1 1 — Music Theory 5 

Music 12 — Music Theory. 5 

Electives 10 

TOTAL 49 



(9) Physical Education 
First Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14, 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 .... 3 

Biology 14, 15 10 

Home Economics In — Nutrition.... 4 

Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

**Electives 6 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology 18, 19 — Anatomy and 

Physiology 10 

***Physical Education 23 — Senior 

Life Saving and Swimming 2 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating 

of Basketball 2 

Psychology 21a — Introductory 5 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 5 

Sociology 21 — Marriage & the 

Family 5 

**Electives 6 



TOTAL 



48 



** It is recommended that English 28 and Physical Education 20 be taken as 

elective courses. 
***The student is exempt from this course provided he has a Red Cross Senior 

Life Saving Certificate. 



12 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



(10) Physics 

A i ourse designed foj those students who wish to major in Physics. 



First Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 
History 14. 15 — Western 
C livilization 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 
Chemistry or Biology 
Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 
Mathematics 1 7 — Trigonometry 
Mathematics 20 — Analytic Geom- 
t'trv and Calculus 



48 



Second Year 

Sophomore 



English 21, 

English 
Physical Education 
Mathematii i 21, 22 
Physics 21, 22, 23 
fElectives 

TOTAL 



-Calculus 



10 
3 

15 
18 

1" 



56 



TOTAL 

(11) Pre-Dental 

This program is designed for those students who wish to pie- 
pare themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three 
or more years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is 
awarded upon successful completion of the academic program de- 
scribed below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 

Biology 14. 15 — General Zoology .. 10 
Mathematics 16. 17 — Algebra & 

Trigonometry 10 

Chemistry 11. 12. 13— General 

Chemistry 15 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 



TOTAL 



48 



English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 
History 14. 15 — Western 

Civilization 
Biology 23 — Comparative 

Anatomy 
French or German 11, 12 
Electives 
Phvsical Education 



10 

10 

6 
10 

1" 
3 



TOTAL 49 

(12) Pre-Medical 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of medicine after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded 
upon completion of the academic program described below. 

First Year Second Year 



English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 

Biology 11. 15 — General Zoology 10 
Chemistry 11. 12. 13— General 

Chemistry 15 
Mathematics 16. 17 — Algebra 

and Trigonometry 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 



English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 
Biology 23 — Comparative 

Anatomy 
French or German 11. 12 
History 14. 15— Western 

Civilization 
Electives 



TOTAL 



48 Physical Education 



10 

6 
10 

10 
10 



TOTAL 

t Electives should include a foreign language, preferably German. 



49 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



(13) Pre-Nursing 

This is a one-year program lor those students who wish to obtain 

tlieii freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offei ing a B.S. in Nursing. 

First Year 

English II. 15— Freshman English 10 
History 11. 15 Western 

Civilization 10 

Chemistry 11 — General Chemistry 5 
Sociology 20a — Introductory 

Sociology 5 

Psychology 2 1 a- — Introductory 

Psychology 5 

Psychology 5 

Physics 14 — General Physics 5 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

TOTAL 48 

In addition to the above requirements, the School of Nursing, 
Medical College of Georgia, requires that the student satisfy the State 
requirements covering the Constitution of the United States and the 
History of the United States and Georgia by completing an examina- 
tion in each of these two areas or by taking Political Science 13 and 
History 100. In addition it should be pointed out that the pre- 
requisites for taking Physics 14 are Mathematics 16 and 17 (College 
Algebra and Trigonometry). It should be obvious at this point that 
in order to complete all of these requirements, the student should 
begin this program in the summer preceding the anticipated Fall 
enrollment. 

( 14) Pre-Optometry 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of op- 
tometry in the United States are relatively uniform but are not 
identical. The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards 
of Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare 
a student for transfer to any school or college of optometry in the 
United States and Canada. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

History 14. 15 — Western English 10 

Civilization 10 Biology 23 — Comparative Anatomy 6 

Biology 14. 15 — General Zoology 10 Mathematics 17. 20 — Trigonom- 

Chemistry 11. 12 — General etry and Analytics 10 

Chemistry 10 Sociology 20a — Introductory 5 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 Psychology 21a — Introductory 5 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 Electives ' 10 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 48 

TOTAL 49 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

(15) Pre-Phannacy 

1 his is a two-yeai concentration foi those students who wish to 

obtain theii freshman requirements foi entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmac) require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Pharmacy after completing two years of 
academic studies. Beginning in 1960 all students of Pharmacy are 
required to complete a five-year program, two of which are in Pre- 
Pharmacy and three in an accredited School of Pharmacy. An Asso- 
ciate in Arts degree is awarded upon completion of the academic 
program described below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

History 14, 15 — Western English 10 

Civilization 10 Economics 21 — Economic 

Mathematics 16, 17 — Algebra Principles 5 

and Trigonometry 10 Political Science 13 — Government 

Chemistry 11, 12, 13— General of U. S 5 

Chemistry . 15 Phvsics 14 — General Physics 5 

Phvsical Education 11, 12, 13 3 Biology 11. 14, 15— Botany & 

Zoolosv 15 

TOTAL 48 Electives .10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 48 

(16) Pre- Veterinary 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a senior institution. 
Some colleges and universities require a veterinary student to begin 
specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well-rounded 
foundation for the study of veterinary medicine, it is recommended 
that he pursue the two year pre-medical program. 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 

History 14. 15 — Western Civilization 10 

Phvsical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Biolosv 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 11, 12 10 

Mathematics 16, 17 10 



TOTAL 53 

(17) Teaching 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years 1>\ 

colleges preparing teachers are general in nature: English, history, 
mathematics, sciences, social studies and physical education, to men- 



I LUMINAL PR( HIK.Wh 



r» 



tit mi some of these. The program belov* enables prospective teachers 
to In- certified by the State Department of Education as having com- 
pleted two years of college and entitles the student to the Associate 

in Aits 1 >egtf 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15 10 Education Jl 

History 1 1. 15— 10 English 21 10 

Biological Science . 10 Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

Physical Ed. 11. 12, 13 3 Physical Education 

Political Science 13 5 Psychology 21a 

Art 1 1 or Music 20 5 *Electives 20 

•Elective* 5 

TOTAL 48 

TOTAL 48 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 

(18) Business Administration 

Accounting 

TWO-YEAR TERMINAL 



counting T td^unp^t 



First Year 

Business Administration 24, 25 — 

Accounting .... 10 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 
History 14. 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Natural Science 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 .... 3 

Elective 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

Bus. Administration 34, 35 — 
Intermediate Accounting . 
English 21, 22 or English 21, 28 
Economics 21, 24 — Principles 

of Economics 
Bus. Administration 27 — 

Business Law- 
Physical Education . 
Electives 



TOTAL 



in 
10 

10 

5 
3 

in 



18 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll 
for additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate 
will be awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 



* Students in this curriculum should secure the catalog of the senior college 
which they plan to attend and plan a program with an adviser. 
Recommended electives for elementary teachers include health, geography, 
economics. Georgia problems (Social Science 4). English 28 and additional 
science courses. 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Business Administration 36, 37 — Income Tax Accountiim 10 

Business Administration 29 — Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 160 — Principles of Management 5 

Business Administration 28 — Business Law 5 
Electives chosen from Business Administration. Economics or 

Industrial Technology courses 20 



TOTAL 45 

(20) Business Administration 

General 

TWO-YEAR TERMINAL 
First Year Second Year 

English 14. 15 — Freshman English 10 Bus. Administration 24, 25 — 

History 14, 15 — Western Principles of Accounting 10 

Civilization 10 English 21. 22 or English 21. 28 10 

Natural Science 10 Bus. Administration 27 — Bus. Law 5 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles Electives 20 

of Economics 10 Physical Education 3 

Bus. Administration 160 — 

Principles of Management 5 TOTAL 48 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

TOTAL 48 

A student who desires further training in this field may enroll 
for additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will 
be awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration T 28 — Business Law 5 

Business Administration T 151 — Principles of Transportation 5 

Business Administration T 161 — Principles of Insurance 5 

Business Administration T 162 — Real Estate Principles 5 

Economics T 125 — Elementary Economic Statistics 5 

Economics T 127 — Money and Banking 5 

Economics T 128 — Principles of Marketing 5 

Economics T 129 — Labor Economics 5 

Economics T 130 — Personnel Administration 5 

Economics T 131 — Government and Business 5 

Economics T 132 — Investments 5 

Students interested in the field of Industrial Management ina\ 
substitute 15 hours in the Industrial Technology Curriculum from 
the following courses: 

IT 121 — Production Organization 3 

IT 122 — Economic Analysis .... 3 

IT 123— Production and Cost Control 3 

IT 12 I Time and Motion Study 3 

IT 127— Data Presentation 3 

II 128- -Personnel Motivation 3 



fERMINAL PROGRAMS 47 



(2 1 ) Business Administration 

Transportation 

As a communications center. Savannah offers man) opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management. A 
committee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck 
lines, in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the pro- 
fessional classes listed below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 11. 15 — Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 — World Literature 
History 14. 15 — Western or English 28 — Public Speaking 

Civilization 10 and Bus. Administration 115 — 

Bus. Administration T-151 — Bus. Corrrespondence 10 

Introduction to Transportation 5 Natural Science 10 

Bus. Administration T-152 — Bus. Administration T-154 — Ad- 

Elementary Rates & Tariffs 5 vanced Rates & Tariffs 5 

Bus. Administration T-153 — Bus. Administration T-155 — Inter- 

Intermediate Rates & Tariffs 5 state Commerce Law 5 

Economics 21. 24 — Principles Bus. Administration T-156 — Inter- 

and Problems 10 state Commerce Commission 

and Public Service Commission 
Procedure 5 

s. Administration 24. 25 — 
Elementary Accounting 10 



TOTAL 45 Procedure 

Bus. Administration 24. 25 



TOTAL 45 

Students desiring further training in this general field may select 
five other subjects listed under the Business Administration, General, 

(curriculum number 20). A certificate will be awarded upon com- 
pletion of 45 hours additional work. 

(22) Transportation 

Fifty-Hour Concentration in Transportation 

Students wishing a thorough background in transportation may 
receive a certificate upon satisfactory completion of the program that 
follows : 

BA T-151 — Introduction to Transportation 5 

BA T-152— Elementary Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA T-153— Intermediate Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA T-154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA T-155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 
BA T-156 — Interstate Commerce Commission and Public 

Service Commission Procedure 5 

Economics 121 and 124 — Principles and Problems 10 

English 114 and 115 — Freshman English, or English 128 — Public 10 

Speaking and BA 115 — Business Correspondence 10 

TOTAL 50 



48 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

(23) Business Administration 

One-Year Program 

A one year program in Business Administration with emphasis 
on business courses) for those persons who may not wish to complete 
the two-year concentration. A certificate will be awarded to those who 
successfully complete the program. 

Business Administration 24, 25, 34 15 

Economics 21. 24 10 

Business Administration 27 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education ..... 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 



(24) Commerce Secretarial 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business. If, due to prior 
training, a student is permitted by the instructor to omit the beginning 
theory courses in shorthand or typing, the student must choose elective 
subjects to supplement the total college hours required. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15 — Freshman English 10 Business Administration 24 — 

History 14, 15 — Western Accounting 10 

Civilization .10 *English 21, 22 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Natural Science 10 Commerce 21 a-b-c — Typing 6 

Commerce 11 a-b-c — Typing 6 Commerce 22 a-b-c — Shorthand 15 

Commerce 12 a-b-c — Shorthand ... 15 Physical Education 

TOTAL 54 TOTAL 44 



(25) Commerce Stenographic 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the clerical skills which will enable her to secure employment 
as a stenographer or clerk. Whether or not a sttident will be placed 
in beginning theory classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon 
how much previous training she has had in those subjects; a more 
advanced standing must be approved by the instructor. A certificate 
is awarded upon completion of the following program. 



* English 28 may be substituted for English 22 



rERMINAL PR< K3RAMS !'• 



Commerce 1 1 a, 1>. c Typing '_• 

Commerce 12 a, K c Shorthand '5 

Commerce 17 Office Practice _' 

Business Administration 2 I Accounting ' 

••English 1 !. 15 Freshman 1 ( > 
Physical Education 1 1. 12. 13 

Elective 5 

TOTAL W 

(26) Home Economics 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who 
plan to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives 
are allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which 
have a vocational value or cultural subjects for worthy use of leisure 
time. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14, 15— Freshman English 10 English 21, 22— Sophomore 

History 14, 15 — Western English 10 

Civilization 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 3 Home Economics 21 — Home 

Natural Science 10 Planning and Decorating 5 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation: Home Economics 24 — Family 

Personal Development 5 Fundamentals 5 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing .... 5 Home Economics 12 — Family 

Psychology 21a — Introductory 5 Meal Planning and Serving 5 

Electives 20 

TOTAL 48 

TOTAL 48 

(27) Human Relations* 

The Terminal sequence in Human Relations is designed to start 
with the student's immediate interests in earning methods of study and 
aptitude measurement. The next course, on principles and facts about 
the individual's growth, needs, feelings and learning about the world 
around him, is followed by a practical application through experiments 
or by interning in selected community programs where individual 
development and adjustment may be directly observed. This leads to 
a study of a person's relationship to his social groups, a study of 
marriage and family adjustment, principles and facts about the way 
that our society is organized and finally to a practical study, through 
local organizations, of needs and resources for human adjustment in 
our community. A student who completes this sequence should have 
a basic understanding of himself and others that will improve his 



* Students in other concentrations may elect any Psychology or Sociology 
course in this program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites 
are necessary in Psychology 21b, Sociology 20b and Psychology 22. 

**English 28 may be substituted for English 15. 



50 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



effectiveness in his family, his work whether in the home 01 employed 
elsewhere . his sb< ial relationships and his responsible participation 
in community living. 



First Year 



HI 



English 14. 15. Freshman English 
History 11. 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

Political Science 13 5 

Psychology 20 — Applied 

Psychology 5 

Psychology 2 1 a — Introductory 

Psychology 5 

Psychology 21b — Experimental 

Psychology 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Biology 14, 15 — General Zoology 

or 
Biology 16. 17 — Human Biology 10 
Physical Education 3 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and 

Family 5 

Psychology 22 — Social Psychology 5 
Sociology 20a — Introductory 

Sociology 5 

Sociology 20b — Social Problems 5 

Elective 5 



TOTAL 



48 



(28) Liberal Arts 

A student in the Liberal Arts, Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 



First Year 



10 



English 14. 15. Freshman English 
History 14. 15 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Mathematics 9 or 16 5 

••Electives 10 



Second Year 

TOTAL 48 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

**Electives 35 



TOTAL 



48 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will 
be awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

History 25 5 

Philosophy 10 5 

Select 20 hours from the following 20 

French. German or Spanish 

Two additional laboratory (double) or 
Mathematics Courses 
Electives 15 



**A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following depart- 
ments: Foreign Language, Political Science. Economics. Fine Arts. Home 
Economics. Philosophy. Psychology. Sociology. Mathematics (other than 
Mathematics 19). 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 51 

(29) Medical Technology 

This is a two-year program for those students who wish to meet 
the requirements of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and 
who will complete their training at some approved school of Medical 

Technology. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion oi the academic program described below. 

Armstrong College is affiliated with the Savannah School for 
Medical Technologists, which is nationally approved. It is possible 
for a student to meet all requirements for national registration through 
these two institutions. 

First Year Second Year 

English 14. 15. Freshman English 10 English 21. 22 — Sophomore 
Biology 14. 15 — General Zoology 10 English 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 Chemistry 25a, 25b — 
Chemistry 11. 12. 13 — General Quantitative 

Chemistry 15 Biology 23— Comparative 

**Electives 5 Anatomy 6 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 Biology 21 — Microbiology 5 

History 14. 15 — Western 

TOTAL 48 Civilization 10 

**Electives 7 to 10 
Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 48 to 51 



(40) Medical Office Assistant 

This two year curriculum leading to the degree of Associate in 
Arts is designed to develop a graduate who can meet the ever-increas- 
ing demand for efficient assistants trained not only in standard office 
operations but also in professional ethics and the routine technical 
procedures that are commonly carried on in the physician's oil ice. 
In addition, the student will have a good background in the area of 
general education. 

The Medical Office Assistant must be prepared to act as recep- 
tionist, office nurse, secretary and laboratory assistant. She must be 
tactful, understanding and discreet, as well as meticulously accurate 
in laboratory work and the keeping of medical and financial records. 
Such an assistant would be in demand not only in physicians' offices 
but in hospitals, clinics, public health agencies, and a number of other 
institutions in the areas of health and welfare. 



**Electives strongly recommended are Physics. Typing and Psychology. It 
should be noted that if Physics is desired, an additional course in mathe- 
matics should be taken, preferably during the Freshman year. 



ARMSTRONG. ( OLLEGE OI SAVANNAH 



First Year Second Year 

Commerce Ha, b, c Typing 6 Bioloux 21, 22 Microbiology and 

Commerce 12a, 1>. c Shorthand 15 Clinical Laboratory 10 

English 14. 15, Freshman English 10 Chemistry 11 — Inorganic 5 

Biology 18. 19 — Anatomy & English 21 — Sophomore English 5 

Physiol 10 English 22 or 28 — Sophomore Eng- 

History 14 — Western Civilization 5 lish or Public Speaking 5 

Bus Administration 24 — History 15 — Western Civilization 5 

Accounting 5 Commerce 24 — Med. Terminology 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 and Dictation 5 

Commerce 28 — Med. Office 

TOTAL 54 Practice 5 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Physical Education 

TOTAL 48 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 

BASIC SUBJECTS 

Required in all Technical Institute Programs 

Course descriptions for Technical Institute Programs are listed 

elsewhere in this Bulletin. A student may register for any of the 

subjects in the program of his choice as soon as he has met the 
prerequisites. 

English 14 Freshman English 5 

GT 114 Technical Mathematics I (or Math 16) 5 

GT 115 Technical Mathematics II (or Math 17) 5 

Physics 14 Mechanics 5 

Physics 15 Electricity 5 

Physics 16 Heat. Sound. Light 5 

Engineering 1 1 Engineering Drawing 3 

Psychology 20 Applied Psvchologv 5 

GT 113 ' Technical Report 'Writing 3 

GT 112 or Public Speaking 3 

English 28 or Fundamentals of Speech 5 

English 50 Public Speaking 5 



44 or 46 

(39) Building Construction Technology 

Building Construction Technology deals with the design, con- 
struction and construction supervision of homes, industrial plants. 
offices, schools and hospitals. The student is taught to design, draw- 
plans and follow through with construction details and methods. 

Graduates in this program will be qualified for many positions. 
Including engineering draftsman, general contractor, junior engineer, 



1 i.( HNICAL INSTITUl E PROGRAMS 



architectural i1i.iIimh.ui and estimator, building inspector] and man) 
othei s. 



Ci\. 1 121 


Elemental \ Sui \ <\ ing 


6 


B( I 121 


( .1 ,l|)ll!i s 


i) 


<, h 11 \\ 


Mechanics ol Materials 


6 


B< I Jll 


Wood and Steel Construction 


5 


B< r 212 


( Soncrete ( lonstruction 


5 


Civ. T211 


Structural Drafting I 


2 


Civ. T 212 


Structural Drafting II 


I 


B( l ::: 


Building Design I 


'» 


BC l .i: 1 


Building Design II 


6 


BCT 224 


Building Design III 


t> 


B( I 1 12 


Construction Materials and Estimates 


6 


BCT 243 


Building Equipment 


3 


BCT 231 


Architectural History 


3 



62 

(31) Chemical Technology 

The curriculum for Chemical Technology has been designed to 
meet the needs of the chemical, paper and other related heavy in- 
dustries for competent and well-trained technicians. The program 
gives the student a working knowledge of the fundamental branches 
of formal chemistry and chemical engineering. 

Industries are placing greater emphasis every year on instrumental 
methods of analysis which are far more rigid and precise than formal 
chemical methods. The student completing the curriculum in Chemical 
Technology will acquire training in the theory and use of these 
electronic, optical and thermal instruments. 

Positions open to graduates are assistant to reasearch personnel, 
control chemist, assistant to chemical engineers, analyst and pilot 
plant assistant, as well as many others. 

Chemistry 11 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 12. General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 13 Qualitative Inorganic Analysis 5 

Engineering 12 Engineering Drawing 3 

Chemistry 25a Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 4 

Chemistry 25b Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 3 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety l/ 2 

*CT 120 Analysis of Variations 3 

*CT 121 Experimental Design 3 

*CT 160 Material & Energy Balances 5 

*CT 162 Elementary Chemical Processes 4 

*CT 165 IndustriafChemistrv 4 



45/a 



In addition, the student will select one of the two options listed 
below. 



* These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corporation. 



"»1 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



PULP AND PAPER OPTION 

Pulping 5 

Papei Machinery 5 

Paper Testing 3 

Pulp Testing 3 

Wood Structure and Properties 4 



( 1 


1 in 


CT 


111 


( 1 


1 U 


CT 


1 i:; 


( 1 


164 



20 
CHEMICAL OPTION 

Engineering 13 Engineering Drawing 3 

GT 120 Applied Higher Mathematics 5 

Mathematics 114 Slide Rule 2 

h CT 150 Organic Chemistry 5 

h CT 151 Industrial Chemical Analysis 3 



18 

(32) Industrial Technology 

The curriculum in Industrial Technology is designed to enable 
the graduate to compete successfully for a variety of supervisory and 
management positions in manufacturing industries. These positions are 
in such categories as personnel work, quality control, methods and 
cost control, and the equipment, planning and production functions. 
The graduate will also be qualified for many staff positions with trans- 
portation, distributing and utility companies, and for the operation 
of private business. 

Economics 21 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 24 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics T-128 Principles of Marketing 5 

Business Adm. 24 Principles of Accounting 5 

Engineering 12 Engineering Drawing 3 

Engineering 13 Engineering Drawing 3 

Chemistry 11 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 12 General Inorganic 5 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety 1 '/> 

*IT 120 Manufacturing Processes 3 

*IT 121 Production Organization 3 

*IT 122 Economic Analysis 3 

*IT 123 Production and Cost Control 3 

*IT 124 Time and Motion Study 3 

•IT 125 Mechanical Methods 2 

•IT 126 Advanced Time and Motion Study 3 

•IT 127 Data Presentation 3 

•IT 128 Personnel Motivation 3 



63 

(37) Mechanical Technology 

This field embraces the manufacture and production of mechan- 
ical products and the tools, machines and processes by which they are 
made. In a broad sense mechanical technology is the creation and 

* I hese courses will he taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corporation. 



1 ECHNK \1. INS I I I l I E PROGRAMS 35 



utilization of mechanical power, and men with technical institute type 
of training in this field possess a knowledge that is basic to companies 
in nearly ever) line of business throughout the world. 

Positions open to mechanical technicians include various kinds <>! 

inspection, maintenance men. engineer's assistant, foreman in various 

fields, production supervisoi and junior designer of machines oi tools 

and dies. 

Mathematics 1 1 1 Slide Rule 

Chemistry 11 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 12 General Inorganic 5 

Economics 2 1 Principles and Problems 5 

Engineering 12. 13 Engineering Drawing 6 

Civ. T 1 IS Mechanics of Materials 6 

*MT 120 Tools and Methods . 5 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety 1/.. 

*IT 120 Manufacturing Processes .. 3 

•IT 125 Mechanical Methods 

*MT 122 Machine Shop 5 

*MT 123 Metallurgy, Welding. Heat Tr. 6 

**MT 126 General Sheet Metal 2 

*MT 127 Industrial Electricity 4 

*MT 128 Fluid Mechanics 5 

*IT 124 Time. Motion Studv 3 



65 J/ 2 

(34) Civil Technology 

Civil Technology covers one of the broader fields in the Technical 
Institute Program. The civil technician is a surveyor, a construction 
man on buildings of all kinds, highways and railroads, hydroelectric 
projects, locks, dams, tunnel and similar projects. He is trained to 
handle work in any of these fields with a minimum of supervision. 

Civ. T 141 Blueprint Reading 3 

BCT. 142 .Construction Materials and Estimates 6 

Civ. T 121 Elementary Surveying 6 

Civ. T 122 Route Surveying 5 

Civ. T 131 Highway Construction 3 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212.- Concrete Construction 5 

Civ. T 212 Structural Drafting I 2 

Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 2 

Civ. T 224 Topographic and Contour Surveying 4 

Civ. T 223 Land Surveys ..... 5 

Civ. T 232 Heavy Construction 4 

Civ. T 241 Hydraulics 6 

Civ. T 143.. Mechanics of Materials 6 



62 



* These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper 

Corporation. 
**This class will be conducted at the plant of the Great Dane Trailers. Inc. 



56 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

(36) Electronics and Communication Technology 

This course gives the student training in the fields of electrical 
and electronic circuitry, transmission lines, radiation, wave filters, 
instrumentation and test equipment, telephony, AM and FM radio, 
television and radar. 

Students completing the electronics course should be able to fill 
i (sponsible positions as production and maintenance technicians and 
project and control technicians in the fields of radio, television and 
radar; electronics laboratory and research technicians and electronic 
equipment sales and service technicians. 

GT 120 Applied Higher Mathematics 5 

Elec. T 121 Alternating Current Circuits I 6 

Elec. T 122 Alternating Current Circuits II 6 

Elec. T 223 Alternating Current Circuits III 4 

Elec. T 131 Basic Electronics 6 

Elec. T 232 Industrial Electronics 6 

Elec. T 233 Advanced Electronics 4 

Elec. T 241 Communications Circuits I 6 

Elec. T 242 Communications Circuits II 6 

Elec. T 243 Communications Circuits III 4 

Elec. T 254 Electrical Machinery 3 

Elec. T 261 Communications Technology I 6 

Elec. T 262 Communications Technology II 6 

Elec. T 263 Television Technology 4 

72 

Plus one of the following electives: 

Civ. T 141 Blueprint Reading 3 

CT 120 Analysis of Variations 3 

GT 111 Industrial Safety 1/a 

Math. 121 Calculus 5 

Math. 114 Slide Rule .2 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to I 1 withdraw an) course 
foi which less than ten students noisier, (2) limit the enrollment in 

any course 01 class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as demand and 
stall personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 

the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed, 
for example: Biology 16-17. 

Economics and Business Administration courses marked with a 
T are terminal courses, and do not transfer to the University of 
Georgia. Technical Institute courses transfer only to another Tech- 
nical Institute. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, 
the number of hours of laboratory: and the third, the number of 
quarter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biology 11- 
General Botany (3-4-5). 

Art 

Art 11 — Creative Art (3-4-5). Spring. 

Drawing, painting and design principles, with some pertinent 
background history. Introductory practice in techniques, and applica- 
tion to everyday life needs. 

Art 13— Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A beginner's course in the fundamentals of pottery and clay 
modeling. Various ways of forming clay, decorating, glazing and 
firing suitable subjects. 

Art 14— Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A continuation of the beginner's course with emphasis on design, 
using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Work 
may be developed in pottery or clay sculpture. 

Biology 

Biology 11— General Botany (3-4-5). Fall. 

A study of the structure of roots, stems and leaves, basic physi- 
ology and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative species. 



58 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Biology 12 General Botany 3-4-5 . Spring. Prerequisite: Bi- 
ology 1 1 . 

A stud) of Mproduction, heredity and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes frequent field trips. 

Biology 14 — General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey of 
the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species of 
the basic invertebrate phyla. 

Biology 15 — General Zoology (3-4-5 . Winter and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Botany 14. 

Study of vertebrate structure and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. 

Biology 16-17 — Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Four lectures and one demonstration period. 

A non-laboratory course beginning with a survey of the basic 
biological principles and continuing with a study of the structure 
and function of the human body. The second quarter is a continua- 
tion of the first and concludes with a study of the principles of 
genetics and evolution. No credit for graduation is allowed until 
sequence is completed. 

Biology 18-19- — Human Anatomy and Physiology (3-4-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

A two-quarter course considering the gross anatomy, histology and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physi- 
ology. Not for pre-medical and pre-dental students. 

Biology 20 — General Entomology. (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite 
- — One quarter of a laboratory biology. Four lectures and one demon- 
stration period each week. 

A study of the structure, biology, classification and control of 
important and significant insects as applied to man. 

Biology 21 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Ten 
hours of a biological science with a laboratory and five hours of in- 
organic chemistry. 

An introduction to micro-organisms with primary emphasis on 
bacteria. The morphology, life history and public health importance 
of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa and helminthes arc 
considered. 

Biology 22- —Clinical Laboratory (3-4-5). Prerequisite: Sopho- 
more standing. 

Sterilization of gloves and instruments: professional assistance to 



COURSE DESCRIF1 IONS 

the doctor; injections; urinalysis, hemotology, hemoglobin determina- 
tion, EKG and basal metabolism techniques. 

Biology 2!> Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 3-6-6 . Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems oi 
the vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration 24 — Principles of Accounting s Introduc- 
tory 5-0-5 . Fall. Winter and Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals 
and the voucher adjustment system. 

Business Administration 25 — Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 24. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of financial state- 
ments. 

Business Administration T-27 — Business Law (5-0-5). Fall. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, 
rights of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Business Administration T-28 — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. 

The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the fol- 
lowing subjects which are of particular interest to those planning to 
major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of 
partners, termination. Corporation: formation, power rights of se- 
curity holders, types of securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, 
remedies. 

Business Administration T-29 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
the order and the process methods. 

Business Administration T-34 — Principles of Accounting, Inter- 
mediate (5-0-5) . Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 

Basic accounting theory and the solution of problems requiring an 
application of accounting theory. 



60 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Business Administration T-35- Intermediate Accounting (5-0-5). 
Second course. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-34. 

A continuation of Business Administration T-34 emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the appli- 
cation of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration T-36 — Income Tax Accounting. Fall. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 

A study of federal income tax laws and the application of these 
laws to the income tax returns of individuals, partnerships and 
corporations. 

Business Administration T-37 — Tax Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration T-36 (136). 

A continuation of Business Administration T-36 with emphasis on 
corporations and fiduciary returns and social security taxes, gift taxes 
and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cation. Stress is placed upon the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Business Administration T-31 — -Retail Advertising and Sales Pro- 
motion (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 24. 

A course in retail advertising and sales promotion basically con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields — emphasizing the psychology of 
advertising as a branch of sales. The course explores the various media 
and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an advertising 
course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the average 
salesman. 

Business Administration T-151 — Introduction to Transportation 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

History of transportation; development leading to legislatiw 
supervision of railroads; developments leading to Federal regulation 
of carriers, other than railroads; freight classifications: principles of 
freight rates and tariff. 

Business Administration T-152 — Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-151 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application: special freight serv- 
ices; Freight claims, overcharge and loss and -damage: freight tariff 



COURSE DES< KH'l K >NS 61 

circulars; construction and filing <>l t.nitls: terminal facilities and 
sw itching : and demui rage. 

Business Administration T-153 Intermediate Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5 . Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-152, 01 per- 
mission of instructor. 

Reconsignment and diversion; transit privileges; rules governing 
stopping in transit shipments for partial unloading and to complete 
Loading; weights, weighing, and payment oi freight charges; ware- 
housing and distribution : material handling; and packaging. 

Business Administration T-154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-153, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Through routes and rates; milling in transit: technical tariff and 
rate interpretation; overcharges and undercharges; loss and damage 
claims: import and export traffic; and classification committee pro- 
cedure. 

Business Administration T-155 — Interstate Commerce Law. 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration T-154, or 
permission of the instructor. 

Evolution of Interstate Commerce Act; construction of Interstate 
Commerce Act; interpretation and application of Interstate Commerce 
Act; application of penalties under the Interstate Commerce Act; 
creation and organization of Interstate Commerce Commission; prac- 
tice before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business Administration T-156 — Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion and Public Service Commission Procedure (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration T-155, or permission of the in- 
structor. 

Practice before Interstate Commerce Commission; statutory au- 
thority for awarding damages; revision of Commission's decision; 
general review. 

Business Administration 160 — Principles of Management. 5-0-5) . 
Prerequisite : Economics 24. 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Business Administration T-161 — Principles of Insurance (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 24. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 



62 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

tion ol the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted 

insurance practices. 

Business Administration T-162 -— Real Estate Principles (5-0-5). 
Prerequiiste : Economics 24. 

A consideration of the general principles of property utilization. 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens; the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulatory legislation. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 11 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, Mathematics 9, or 
consent of instructor. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and 
their applications. 

Chemistry 12 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite : Chemistry 1 1 . 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 1 1 . 

Chemistry 13 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 12. 

A study of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 
common cations and anions by semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 25a — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-6-4). Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Chemistry 13 or approval of the instructor. 

A study of the fundamental theories and applications of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. No credit 
is given for this course before completion of Chemistry 25b. 

Chemistry 25b — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis i 1-6-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 25a or its equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 25a. 

Commerce 

Commerce Ha.— Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. 

'This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care o( the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. 



( oi RSE DES< KIM IONS 



Comment lib lit ginning Typing Continued 0-5-2 . Fall, 
Winter and Spi ing. 

This course is a continuation oi speed development. In addition. 
Instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commera Lie — Intermediate Typing 0-5-2). Fall. Wintei and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce I la-b or equivalent. 

A typewrite] course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 

minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 12a-b — Beginning Shorthand 5-0-5 . Fall and Win- 
ter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dicta- 
tion and transcription from studied material. 

Commerce 12c Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 13a — Burroughs Calculator and Comptomi h / 0-5-2). 
Fall. Winter and Spring. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in 
the operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a 
thorough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to 
the operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calcu- 
lator. 

Commerce 13b — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2 | . 
Fall, Winter and Spring. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, 
invoicing over the fixing decimal, percentages, discounts and chain 
discounts, cost, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Winter and Spring. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain, 
cipher, divisions, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy 



64 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Commerce 21a Advanced Typing [0-5-2). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various Legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. 

Commerce 21b — A continuation of Commerce 21a (0-5-2). Fall. 
Winter and Spring. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 21b (0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 22a — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequi- 
site: Commerce 12a, b, c. or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 
plied in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in 
transcribing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general 
business material; the second half, to dictation material applying to 
major vocations. 

Commerce 22b — A continuation of Commerce 22a (5-0-5). Win- 
ter. 

Commerce 22c — A continuation of Commerce 22b 5-0-5 
Spring. A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 24— Medical Terminology and Orientation (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite : Sophomore standing- The building of a medical vocabu- 
lary, use of medical dictionaries. Practice in dictation and transcrib- 
ing of medical material. 

Commerce 28 — Medical Office Procedure 5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Sophomore standing. 

Preparing, indexing and filing of patients' medical records: pa- 
tient management: patient finance: professional ethics: use of forms 
used bv Medicare. Insurance. Workman's Compensation and Welfare 
Departments. Setting up and maintaining practical financial records. 

Economics 

Economics 21 — Principles and Problems of Economics (5-0-5). 
Fall. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economies 24 — Principles and Problems of Economics 5-0-5 
Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 21. 

A continuation of the study of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 21. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



omics T-125 Elementary Economit Statistics 5-0-5 
An introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart making; elemen- 
tal") statistical procedures and their economic interpretation; intro- 
duction to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 126 American Economic History 5-0-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present with majoi 
emphasis on the period since 1860. It will deal with agriculture, 
industry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, money 
and banking, and finance. 

Economics T-127 -Money and Banking 5-0-5). Prerequisite: 

Economics 124. 

The role of money in the economic organization; monetary 
theory: methods of stabilizing the price level ; the integration of finan- 
cial institutions: theory of bank deposits and elasticity of bank cur- 
rency: discount policy and the interest rate of central banks: methods 
of regulating credit and buisness activities. 

Economics T-128 — Principles of Marketing (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 24. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers; marketing functions: market- 
ing manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products; 
proposals for improving the marketing structure. 

Economics T-129 — Labor Economics (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 24. 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern labor 
organizations and their remarkable growth in recent years. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects of 
our labor problems including the study of wages, working conditions, 
unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hours, workers 
welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future develop- 
ments along these lines. 

Economics T-130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
sites: Psychology 21a and Economics 21. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
istration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded 
personnel program. 

Economics T-131 — Government and Business (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Economics 24. 

A general survey of the economic aspects of business regulation 



66 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

}>\ the government, with specific reference to regulatory developments 
and methods in the United States: othei activities affecting business 
m general^ as extension of loans and subsidies, maintenance of fact- 
finding agencies and government owned corporation. 

Economics T- 132 — Investments. 5-0-5 .Prerequisite: Economics 
T-127. 

A study of stocks and bonds, market operations, investment mathe- 
matics, investment policies and financial statements. 

Education 

Education 21 — Orientation to Teaching 5-0-5). Fall. 

For the beginning or prospective teacher, this subject offei 
broad understanding of the American spirit in education, the place of 
the school in society, its growth and changing function as a social in- 
stitution. The problem and discussion approach is used. 

Education 22— Educational Psychology (5-0-5). 

Special emphasis is placed upon developing competencies on the 
part of the prospective elementary and high school teachers in under- 
standing and applying the psychological principles involved in the 
growth and development of children and youth. Supervised visits 
will be made to schools for observation and study. 

Engineering 

Engineering 11 — Engineering Drawing 0-6-2). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: One year of plane geometry in high school or Mathe- 
matics 108. 

Topics of study include lettering: the use of the instruments; 
orthographic projection: auxiliary views; sections and conventions. 

Engineering 12 — Engineering Drawing 0-6-2). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions: dimensions; pic- 
torial representation: threads and fastenings: shop processes: technical 
sketching: working drawings; pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 — Engineering Drawing 0-6-2 .Spring. Prerequi- 
site: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fit- 
ting ; working drawings; ink tracing on cloth: working drawings 
from assemblies and assemblies from working drawings. 



COURSE DESCRIPTN >NS 



Engineering 1 () Applied Descriptivt Geometry 0-6-2 . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of stud) include the solution of problems involving points. 
lines, .ind planes b) use of auxiliary views; the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes b) revolution methods: simple inter- 
sections; developments of surfaces; an introduction to warped sur- 
faces. Practical applications are emphasized. 

English 

Students will he assigned to freshman English according to re- 
sults of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 

English X— Basic English i 5-0-0) . Fall, Winter and Spring. 

This is a non-credit course for entering students whose rank in 
placement tests is below the minimum required for entrance to full 
academic standing. It is designed to help such students repair de- 
ficiency in reading and writing skills. Upon successful completion 
of this course, a student may be admitted to English 14R. This 
course will not be offered in 1959-60.) 

English 14A — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. 

This course includes theme writing, with emphasis on correct 
and forceful expression. The student also reads and discusses such 
works as the Iliad, the Odssey, and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripedes and Aristophanes. 

English 14R — Freshman English (4-2-5). 

This course will satisfy the requirements for the first quarter of 
Freshman English. It is devoted to grammar, punctuation, spelling, 
vocabulary building, study habits, and organizational skills. The lab- 
oratory portion of the course is designed to help students who show 
a deficiency in reading and related skills. The student's reading diffi- 
culties will be diagnosed. Good reading techniques will be taught. 

English 15A — A continuation of English 14A (5-0-5). Fall. Win- 
ter and Spring. Prerequisite: English 14A. 

The student reads and discusses selections from such authors as 
Montaigne. Swift. Dickens and English and American poets. Theme 
writing is continued with practice in preparing documented papers. 

English 15B — A continuation of English 14R (5-0-5). Winter, 
Spring. 

This course is essentially the same as English 15 A, but more time 
is given to correct expression in writing. A documented paper is pre- 
pared. 



68 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

English 21 — Sophomori English— World Literature 5-0-5 . Fall 
and Winter. Prerequisite: Freshman English. 

A stud) is made of some of the works of Shakespeare Goethe's 
Faust, and selections from the Bible. 

English 22 — Sophomon English — World Literatun 5-0-5 
Winter and Spring. 

Modern literature. The course includes selected modern poetry 
of 19th and 20th century British and American poets; plays by Ameri- 
can, British and continental authors: novels by such writers as 
Faulkner. Flaubert. Fitzgerald. Joyce, etc. 

English 24 — An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 
A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special 
emphasis on more recent poetry. 

English 25 — American Literature 5-0-5). Fall. 

A survey of American literature and culture. Each student is 
asked to select one particular period or era or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 
The course is primarily conducted by reading and discussion. 

English 27 — Modern Drama 5-0-5 i . Fall. 

Class reading and discussion of modern plays from Ibsen's 
"Ghosts" to Miller's ''Death of a Salesman." The course is centered 
on appreciation of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 
reading selected plays aloud. 

English 28 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Winter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gives some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, 
phonetics, gesture, articulation, pronounciation. and regional speech 
differences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the funda- 
mentals of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, ex- 
temporaneous, impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 30 — Principles of Theatre Art 5-0-5 . Spring. 

A study and discussion of the fundamentals involved in the de- 
velopment of dramatic art and in the staging methods which have 
been and are now utilized in producing drama. The course will 
develop chronologically and will relate directly to historical events 
and to the changing form and method of writing for the stage. 

English 50 Public Speaking 5-0-5 . 

Construction and delivery of various types of extemporaneous 

speeches with emphasis on the organization of speeches, the prin- 
ciples of attention, the logical and psychological principles of think- 
ing and speaking, and practices in delivery. 



( oi RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



renc 



French 11-12 Elementary French 5-0-5 , Fall and Winter. 

A course foi beginners. The spoken language is studied -is well 
as LM.inini.tt and reading. No credil foi graduation will be given until 
the sequence is completed. No credit will be given for these courses 
it two years of high school French have been presented for entrance 
credit. 

French 21 Intermediate French (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 

Two quarters of college French or two years of high school French. 
ke\iew grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 — Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama i 5-0-5). Spring, Prerequi- 
site: French 22. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine. 

Geography 

Geography 111 — World Human Geography (5-0-5). 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 
ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

German 

German 11-12 — Beginning German (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

Drill upon pronounciation and elements of grammar, conversation 
and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as much 
as practicable in the classroom instruction. The idiomatic use of the 
language will be studied: reading of texts and translations, conversa- 
tion, dictation, and dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

No credit will be given for these courses if two years of high 
school German has been completed. 

German 21 — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring.- Prerequisite: 
Two quarters of college German or two years og high school German. 

''Grammar review and dialogues." 

Grammar review and comparative grammar studied with the view 
ol enabling students to write compositions. Short stories, life situations 
in Germany. German magazines, memorization of famous German 
songs. Conversation and dialogues. 



70 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Health 

Health 111 Personal and Community Health Problems 5-0-5 . 
This course considers the meaning of health and factors influenc- 
ing health behavior; health problems as related to the individual; 

overview <>1 world, national, state and local health prohlems: com- 
munity health organizations; mobilizing and evaluating community 
health resources. The legal aspects in community health and the 
laws governing reportable diseases is given special attention. 

History 

History 14 — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main cur- 
rents of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western 
Civilization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the 
present time. 

History 15 — A continuation of History 14 (5-0-5 . Winter and 
Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato. Dante. Machiavelli. Descartes, 
Locke, Jefferson, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Malthus, Marx and others. 

History 24 — History of England (5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from early 
times to the present with special emphasis given to developments since 
the Tudor period. 

History 25 — Recent European History (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 
voted to the first World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing that war and the complex of world events which preceded the Sec- 
ond World War. 

History 26 — Recent American History (5-0-5). Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can Life from about 1865 to the present time. 

History 100 — Surrey of American History ^ 5-0-5 ) . 

This course is designed to satisfy the state law requiring that all 
students receiving degrees shall pass an examination on the history 
o( the United States and of Georgia. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 71 



Home Economics 

Hom, Economics In Nutrition and Food Preparation >---l 
Winter. 

The requirements oi different individuals for energy, protein, 
minerals and vitamins; foods as a source of daily requirements, and 
the relation of food and the state of nutrition of an individual to 
physical fitness. 

Horn, Economics 10 — Orientations: Careen and Personal De- 
velopment 5-0-5). Fall. 

The many opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 
and others will be discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
visit the class to show the many vocations dealing with the home. 

How to be more attractive through personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics 11 — Elementary Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. 

Wardrobe planning and selection related to simple problems in- 
volving fundamental garment construction processes; care of clothing, 
including repair. 

Home Economics 12 — Foods (3-4-5). Fall. 

Introductory course in food preparation, and serving of nutritious 
and palatable meals for the family. 

Home Economics 21 — Home Furnishings (4-2-5). Winter. 

The interior and exterior planning of the home is studied. Em- 
phasis is placed on style of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economics 23 — Clothing for the Family (2-6-5). Spring. 

Planning the family wardrobe problems. Construction of garments 
for family member. 

Practical application of elementary textile study to the selection 
and use of clothing for the family. 

Home Economics 24 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Fall. 
A course in the family with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

Home Economics 132. — Nutrition Education for Teachex. 

A study of the diet habits of Georgia school children and the re- 
lation of nutrition to health. Emphasis is placed on how teachers 
can enrich school and community programs and improve the health 
of school children through nutrition education. 



72 ARMSTRONG COI.LKtiK ( )1 VWANNAH 

Mathematics 

Mathematics X — Basil Mathematics 5-0-0). Text: Essential 
Mathematics foi College Students. 

This is .1 non-credit course and includes a study of the follow- 
ing topics: operations with integers, operations with common frac- 
tions and mixed numbers, operations with decimals, measurement. 
percentage, and elements of algebra. The last unit includes opera- 
tions with signed numbers, algebraic monomials and polynomials. 
(This course is not offered in 1959-60.) 

Ma the mat ics 8 — Pla ne Geometry 5-0-5 . 

Topics of study include rectilinear figures, congruent triangles, 
the circle, similar figures and polygons. 

Students will not receive college credit for this course if they 
have completed one unit of high school credit in geometry. 

Mathematics 9 — Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5). Fall. Winter, and 
Spring. 

This course includes a study of fractions, signed numbers, linear 
and quadratic equations, ratio, proportion, variation and graphs. 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. 
Prerequisite : Two units of high school algebra or Mathematics 9. 

The course consists of functions and graphs, logarithms, linear 
and quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and 
the elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle. 
the solution of trigonometric equations, proof of trigonometric identi- 
ties, graphs of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric 
functions. 

Mathematics 19 — Mat hematics of Finance (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: 
the operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple prob- 
lems concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and 
annuities. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The 
necessary aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be 
studied. 

Mathematics 20 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 5-0-5). 
spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, graphs of functions, 



i <>l RSE DESCRIPTIONS 73 



limits, differentiation of algebraic functions and some applications ol 

dei i\ au\ es. 

Mathematics 21 Calculus 5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 20. 

This course includes the differentiation and integration of poly- 
nomials, problems in maxima and minima, approximations l>\ differ- 
entials, areas, volumes, centroids*, moment oi inertia and work. 

Mathematics 22 — Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

A continuation of Mathematics 21. This course includes differen- 
tiation of transcendental functions with application to rates, velocity 
and acceleration, curvature and Newton's Method. It also includes 
formulas and methods of integration. 

Mathematics 23 — Calculus 5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 

A continuation of Mathematics 22. This course includes Simp- 
son's rule, indeterminate forms, series, hyperbolic functions, partial 
derivatives and multiple integrals. 

Mathematics 114—77^ Slide Rule | 1-2-2). 

An intensive study and practice in the use of all scales including 
the solutions of problems using the trigonometric scales. 

Music 

Music 11 — Elementary Theory and Sight Reading. (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic- 
dictation, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmony 
are included. 

Music 12 — Theory and Harmony 5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 1 1. 

A continuation of Music 11, with emphasis on harmony, harmonic- 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and re- 
corded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 125 — Appreciation of Music (2-0-2). 

A course designed for the musically untrained who wish an 
intelligent understanding of the art of music. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded listening sessions comprise the course. 



71 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Applied Music Courses 

Applied music courses consist of private instruction in voice or 
an instrument. Two hours credit is received per quarter with six hours 
credit possible pel year. A special applied music fee is charged for 
these courses as indicated under the course descriptions. 

No practice facilities are available at the college. The student 
must have access to private practice facilities in order to enroll for 
applied music courses. 

Music 16 a,b,c — Woodwind Instrument. 2 hours credit per quar- 
tet. One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 17 a, b,c — Violin. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 18 a,b,c — Piano. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 19 a,b,c — Voice. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 21 a,b,c — \'iolin. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 17c. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 22 a, b, c — Piano. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 18c. Special fee $45.00. 

Mu^c 23 a,b,c — Voice. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 19c. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 24 a,b,c — Woodicind Instruments. 2 hours credit per quar- 
ter. A continuation of Music 16c. Special fee $48.00. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy L0 — Introduction to Philosophy 5-0-3 . 
The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulary and problems of philosophy, and the rela- 
tion of philosophy to art, science and religion. Includes a survey ol 
the basic issues and major types in philosophy, and shows their sources 
in experience, history and representative thinkers. 

Philosophy 22- -Honors Seminai 5-0-5 . 

The Honors Seminar will study some aspects of the nature of 
man in the natural world. The aim of the seminar will be to integrate 
what has been approached as specialization in the general curriculum. 
Instructors from the natural sciences, the humanities and the social 
sciences will serve as discussion leaders. 



( ( >URSE DESCRIPTN >NS 75 

This course is open l>\ invitation to sophomores placed on the 
Permanent Dean's Lis! at the end of their freshman yeai and to othei 
sophomores who are recommended l»\ then advisors. 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 11 Conditioning Course 0-3-1). Fall. 
Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lilts and carries, 

load work, duel COmbatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 —Team Sports 0-3-1 . Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

^Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball 1-3-2). Win- 
ter. 

Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

"Physical Education 20 — First Aid and Safety Education 4-0-3). 
Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
by a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

^Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' 
Course in Swimming (2-3-2). Spring. 

May be substituted for Physical Education 13. 

Physical Education 25 — Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 26 — Modem Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 27 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 28 — Adult Recreative Sports i 0-3-1 ). Spring. 

Consists of passive, semi-active and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 31 — Wrestling for Men (0-3-1). Winter. 



Elective unless substituted as written in course description. 



76 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Physical Science 

Physii al Si iem el) 5-0-5) . Fall. No prerequisite. 

A study of the scientific method and its use in man's solutions of 
his physical environment and the nature of things about him, the 
"whys" and "wherefores" or the correlation of the physical universe. 
The student learns the fundamentals of physics and acquires fami- 
lial it\ with the basic formulas and principles. He learns the similarity 
of the application of principles involving small particles to larger or 
planetary particles. If student has completed a course in college 
physics, no credit will be given for this course. 

Physical Science 12 (5-0-5). Winter. No prerequisite. 

A continuation of Physical Science 11. In this course emphasis 
is placed on the study of the principles of inorganic and organic chem- 
istry with some examples of the application of chemistry in household, 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 
structure of the fundamental particles of matter | atoms and molecules) 
is used in the study of the classification of the simple components of 
matter (elements) and the changes which they undergo to form more 
complex substances (compounds). If the student has completed a 
course in college chemistry, no credit will be given for this course. 

Physics 

Physics \l~General Physics— Mechanics. 4-2-5). Fall. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 16 and 17 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics. Force and motion, work and power, 
energy, torque, and properties of gases are included. 

Physics 15 — General Physics — Electricity (4-2-5). Winter. 

Prerequisite: Physics 14 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of magnetism, electric circuits, electric energy and power, 
electromagnetic induction, and principles of alternating current. 

Physics 16 — General Physics — Heat, Sound, and Li^ht 4-2-5 . 
Spring. Prerequisite: Physics 14 and 15 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of heat, sound and light. Under heat will be studied tem- 
perature measurement, thermal expansion, heat quantities, heat trans- 
fer, and thermodynamics. The study of sound includes wave motion, 
sound waves, and acoustics. Light includes reflection, refraction, spec- 
tra, color, and optics. 



i ( >URSE DESCRIF1 K >NS 77 



Physics 21 Mechanu i 5- 1-6 . Fall. 
Prerequisite : Mathematics 20 oi 21. oi concurrent. 

Physics 21. 22 and 23 togethei constitute a thorough course in 
basic physics foi engineers. The five hours of class include one oi two 
demonstration lectures pei week. The solution oi a large numbei of 

problems is required and the course includes application of the ele- 
ments of calculus. 

The laboratory work is designed to give practice in the art of 
making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipulation of ap- 
paratus and added familiarity with some of the concepts of physics. 
The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students the ability to 
decide under what conditions the greater expense of more precise 
measurements is justified. 

Physics 21 is an intensive course in mechanics. It includes the 
study of statics, kinetics, friction, work, power, energy, machines. 
elasticity, hydrostatics, hydraulics and the mechanics of gases. 

Physics 22 — Electricity 5-3-6). Winter. Prerequisite: Physics 
21 and/or those math requirements for Physics 21. 

Physics 22 is an intensive course in electricity. It includes the 
study of magnetism, static electricity, electric circuits, electric energy, 
and power, electromagnetic induction and the principles governing 
AC circuits as well as a study of some electrical instruments. 

Physics 23 — Heat, Sound and Light (5-3-6). Spring. Prerequi- 
sites: Physics 21 and 22 and/or those mathematics requirements for 
Physics 21. 

Physics 23 is an intensive course in heat, sound and light. It 
includes the study of heat, sound, light and atomic physics. Labora- 
tory exercises include temperature measurement, thermal expansion, 
heat quantities, heat transfer, thermodynamics, wave motion, sound 
waves, resonance, acoustics, reflection and refraction of light, the 
quantum theory, spectra and color, optics, and some optical instru- 
ments. 

Political Science 

Political Science 12 — The Governments of Foreign Po:c<i^ 
(5-0-5). 

A study is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. 

Political Science 13 — Government of the United States 5-0-5). 
Fall. Winter and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and workings of the 
national government in the United States and some of the major prob- 



78 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

lems oi the state and local government. The course shows how de- 
velopmental practice has < reated our government as it stands today. 

Psychology 

Psychology 20 — Psychology of Adjustment I 5-0-5 ) . Fall, Winter 
and Spring. 

This course is an orientation into college and into the choice of a 
career. The objective aids developed in the field of phychology will be 
used to discover effective ways of learning in general, and of studying 
in the college setting. Methods of objective measurement of a person's 
intelligence, interests, special aptitudes and personality traits will be 
explored and demonstrated. These will be applied to problems of edu- 
cational, vocational, and special interest training. For persons already 
in employment, special probelms of personnel management and pro- 
duction output may be studied by modern psychological principles and 
techniques. Insofar as possible each student will have an opportunity 
to develop projects in the fields that will be useful in his own plans 
for education and career. 

Psychology 21a — Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall, Winter 
and Spring. 

This course introduces the student to how the basic psychological 
processes operate and affect the behavior of the individual. Facts 
about patterns of growth from birth to maturity, learning to observe 
and deal objectively with the real world, having motivation, emotions, 
conflict and frustration are explored and applied to the student's 
present daily experience. Special study is given to unconscious inllu- 
ences on behavior in the study of mechanisms of defense and ways 
of directing these processes into more realistic and creative use of 
one's feelings, understandings and actions. By the end of the course 
the student is expected to be able to see these processes at work in a 
given example of behavior and to begin to see the interaction of all 
these processes in a given act or experience. In the seminar type oi 
class discussion the focus is on one of these topics at a time. The dis- 
cussion objective is for each student, after study, to share his concept 
of the topic or some phase of it, link it with the information in the 
text, and test it against his own experiences. 

Psychology 21b — Experimental Psychology i 5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21a. 

In this course the principles explained in Psychology 21a will be 
tested and explored by special projects and experimentation. Each 
student will select from a choice of topics introduced in 21a at least 
one systematic experiment and one live project, develop his plan of 
procedure, carry out his study according to approved objective methods 
and prepare a satisfactory written report, ('lass time will be used for 



COURSE DESCRIPTK >NS 7 ( » 

group consultation in ordei that each membei will follow the work 

oi each Other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. 

Topics suitable for a special study project include aspects oi child de- 
velopment or special behavior aspects of children, maturation, emo- 
tions, conflict, frustrations, mechanisms of defense, sensor) processes, 
perception, learning, remembering, thinking, personality adjustment. 

Psychology 22 Social Psychology 5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21a. 

This course centers on a study of the individual's interaction with 
his social groups family, friendship groups, clubs, chinch groups, com- 
munity groups). Forces of need, emotion and interests that bind the 
individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group interaction 
are analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used for experi- 
encing the processes of communication and interaction in a group 
setting. Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, group con- 
flicts, social stratification, mass communication, propaganda, public 
opinion formation and methods of changing group patterns art- studied 
In consulting the reports of responsible studies and by group projects. 

Psychology 120— Basic Applied Psychology (5-0-5). 

The uses of phychology and what it can accomplish in industry. 
A study is made of causation in behavior, leadership, testing, training 
and fatigue, with a view to developing the technique of working with 
superiors, associates and subordinates. Methods of objective measure- 
ments of a person's intelligence, interests, aptitudes and personality- 
traits will be explored and demonstrated. Special problems of per- 
sonnel management and production. 

Psychology 123 — Child Psychology (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 21a. 

This course includes a systematic study of child development: 
physical, mental, emotional, and as a total person. 

Social Science 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce; population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 

Sociology 

Sociology 20a — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter. 

Sociology is the objective study of the interrelationships of people 
as they interact with each other. This course presents information 
which has been gathered by systematic and scientific studies of human 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OI SAVANNAH 

society. Material is drawn from Social Psychology on how an indi- 
vidual is "socialized" to interact with othei people within his culture. 
This leads to some objective study of population patterns and the 

special distribution of people, occupational patterns of human com- 
munities, traits and characteristics of culture groups, typical features of 
group behavior and of the effect of mass communication on public- 
opinion. Looking at mankind as a whole, his institutions of family, re- 
ligion, economic behavior and political behavior are studied as stable 
patterns for meeting basic human needs, and as infinitely varied pat- 
terns adapted to the needs of different human groups. This introduc- 
tion to sociology is successful if it leads the student into a more in- 
formed identification with wider segments of the human family and 
if he gains knowledge of objective methods for fact-gathering in his 
efforts to understand his human environment. 

Sociology 20b — Social Problems 5-0-5 . Spring. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 20a. 

In this course the principles explored in Sociology will be ex- 
plored in planned projects of social research, supervised participation 
and/or analysis of local community resources. These will take form 
in accordance with student interest and actual cooperative resources 
of community organizations and personnel. Suggested areas of study 
are the fields of health physical and mental), poverty, employment. 
education, government, crime juvenile and adult), dependent chil- 
dren, housing, recreation, resources for the aged and others that reveal 
community problems or programs. Class time will be used for group 
consultation in order that each member will follow the work of each 
other student and for use of class guidance and criticism. And the end 
of the course a practical analysis will be made of how social change 
takes place in a community, with attention to the implications for 
change in national and international communities. For those who elect 
the Human Relations Concentration, a special seminar will be held 
at the end of this course for evaluating the students" experience in the 
whole Human Relations sequence. 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and the Family. ~^-^-j . Winter and 
Spring. 

This course first introduces the student to the basic uniformities 
yet infinite varieties of human families. He selects for studying the 
family pattern in a culture different from his own. and interactions of 
a typical family. This should give some sociological understanding of 
the family as a cultural institution. The rest of the course focuses on 
the individual within our culture growing and learning to love in a 
mature marital union. The early childhood learnings which affect basic 
attitudes tow aid parents, authority, the giving and receiving of love, 
and angei are presented from the findings of analytic psychology. 
Then each stage in the preparation for marriage is discussed: dating, 



COURSE DESCRIF1 K >NS Ml 



courting, engagement, marriage, adjustment to money, sex, religion, 
in-laws, friends and children. Some practical studies oi budget, house 
planning, settling differences, using belp, etc., are worked out as 
projects. A prominent physician Is guest lecturei on specialized infor- 
mation affecting the physical adjustment to marriage and parenthood. 
Through the process of free discussions in the group, the students 
begin to experience tin- "give and take "that grows into honesty and 
mutual respect. The experience of this process is used as a way ol 
learning the reciprocal interaction that is basic to mature love ol 

another person. 

Spanish 

Spanish 11-12 Elementary 5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 
These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 

credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. No 
credit will be given for these courses if two years of high school 
Spanish have been completed. 

Spanish 21 — Intermediate 5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years ol 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar, conversation and readings. 

Spanish 22 — Intermediate (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Spanish 21. 
Continuation of Spanish 21. 

Spanish 23 — Survey of Spanish-American Literature (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Spanish 22. 

Outline of Spanish-American Literature and critical appreciation. 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

Courses are designated as follows: 

GT — General Technology for courses which are common to sev- 
eral concentrations. 

GT — Chemical Technology. 

IT — Industrial Technology. 

BCT — Building Construction Technology. 

Elec. T — Electronic and Communications Technology. 

Civ. T — Civil Technology. 

MT — Mechanical Technology. 



82 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

General Technology 

*GT ill— Industrial Safety P/ 2 -0-l/ 2 ). 

A basic study of industrial accident prevention considering the 
nature and extent of the accident problem. A practical study is given 
the technique for control of industrial hazards together with the funda- 
mentals of good organization. 

*GT 112 — Public Speaking. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: English 14 
or the equivalent. 

Study and practice in the fundamentals of public speaking. The 
subject includes training in selecting a subject, obtaining and organiz- 
ing material, and presenting speeches effectively. Each student makes 
several speeches before an audience. 

*GT 113 — Technical Report Writing (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Eng- 
lish 14 or the equivalent. 

Study of the fundamentals of technical writing style and me- 
chanics with practice in preparing reports of various types most likely 
to be used on the job by technicians. 

Technical Mathematics 

These courses are specifically designed for students who intend 
eventually to enter some field of technology. Special emphasis has 
been placed on the applications of mathematical principles to a wide 
range of specific engineering situations. 

GT 114— Technical Mathematics I (5-0-5). 

This course covers the slide rule, a review of arithmetic and 
geometry, basic algebra, analytic geometry, more advanced algebra, 
and logarithms. (Mathematics 16 may be taken instead.) 

GT 115 — Technical Mathematics II. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
GT 114. 

This course consists of an introduction to analytical trigonometry, 
numerical trigonometry of the right triangle, oblique triangles and 
applications of numerical trigonometry, and vector algebra. (Mathe- 
matics 17 may be taken instead.) 

GT 120— Applied Higher Mathematics. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
GT 115. 

An application of mathematics to problems ordinarily not solvable 
by algebra or trigonometry. The subject consists mainly of an intro- 
duction to the more elementary principles and concepts of calculus. 



*( Masses to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



( OURSE DESCRIPTH >NS 



The application oi the calculus is directed toward problems pertinent 
to tli« v student's majoi field ol study. Mathematics 20 ma) be taken 
instead. 

GT 121 Applied Higher Mathematics 5-0-5). 
A continuation of GT 120. 

Chemical Technology 

*CT 120 — Analysis of Variations. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 16. 

An introduction to the application of recognized data analyse to 
technical problems. Instruction is given in the graphic presentation of 
engineering data for maximum effect. Emphasis is placed on determi- 
nation of data variance and comparison of two or more groups of 
data for significant differences. 

*CT 121— Experimental Design. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: CT 120. 

Advanced statistical work, including problems in the determina- 
tion of the proper procedure to be followed in gaining maximum 
information from given data. A study of experimental methods de- 
signed to produce adequate result data at a minimum expenditure of 
time and money. 

*CT 140— Pulping (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 11, 12. 

A brief summary of all commercial pulping processes in use. 
including a study of wood species, chemicals used, cooking conditions, 
characteristics of pulp, and recovery processes. Also included is a 
thorough study of pulping processes now in widespread use in the 
South, with emphasis on the sulphate pulping of pine. 

*CT Hi—Paper Machinery. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: CT 140. 

The study of the function and operation of the various machines 
used for the conversion of pulp to the finished product, including the 
component parts and associated equipment of the fourdrinier machine. 
A survey of the leading types of machines used in the further proc- 
essing of paper and paperboard for the production of bags, boxes and 
similar products. 

*CT 142— Paper Testing (1-4-3). Prerequisite: CT 140. 

A study of the physical properties of paper and paperboard with 
emphasis on the characteristics commonly tested. Details of the con- 
struction, principle and operation of testing equipment are studied. 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



84 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

*CT 143 Pulp Testing t-4-3 . Prerequisite: CT 140. 
A comprehensive review of standard mill and laboratory pulp 
testing equipment and procedures. The interrelationships of different 

pulp properties are studied, together with the theoretical and prac- 
tical considerations of permanganate number and other measures of 
the degree of pulping. 

*CT 150 -Organic Chemistry 5-0-5). 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 17 and Chemistry 25b. 

A classroom survey of the types of organic compounds, theii 
names and structures, preparation, properties and reactions, including 
electronic mechanisms involved in the reactions. 

*CT 151- — Industrial Chemical Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 25b. 

The application of chemical principles to industrial processes of 
water treatment, paper manufacture, waste disposal, acid manufac- 
ture and various other related processes in the paper industry. 

*CT 160 — Material and Energy Balances (5-0-5). Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 16. or GT 114, Chemistry 11. 12, Physics 14. 15, 16. 

A study of the basic principles of physical chemistry and the 
application of these principles in the solution of industrial problems. 
Much attention is given to the laws of thermodynamics and kinetics 
and the integration of these laws into process design procedures. 

*CT 162 — Elementary Chemical Process. 4-0-4). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 25b. CT 160. 

A study of the transformation of energy and heat transfer, evapo- 
ration, distillation, drying, and flow of fluids. 

*CT 164 — Woodstructures and Properties. 3-2-4) . Prerequisites: 

Chemistry 11. 12. Physics 14. 15. 16. 

A course covering the basic process of the formation of wood 
fibers in the living plant and the changes which occur during and 
after the life of the plant. A resume of physical and chemical charac- 
teristics of southern woods, and the means by which these charac- 
teristics may be controlled or altered. 

*CT 165 — Industrial Chemistry (4-0-4). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
12. 

The course covers fundamental chemical processes and reactions 
used in the manufacturing of a large variety of chemical compounds. 
It also gives a general view of the problems oi the chemical industry. 



•Classes to In- conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Gamp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



( ( )l RSE DES< Kll'l K >NS 



Industrial Technology 

// 120 Manufacturing Processes t-0-3 . Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics L6 3 01 ( rT 1 1 1. Physics 14. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
tools and basic manufacturing operations. 

•77 121 — Production Organization 3-0-3 . Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 21-24, and IT L20 oi approval of the instructor. 

Problems in planning for production budgeting, plant location, 
machine] \ and equipment selection, building and service selection, 
maintenance planning, plant layout, materials handling, storekeeping 
planning, personnel organization, employee selection and training. 

*IT 122 — Economic Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Business 

Administration 24 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in economic, financial and intangible analysis. A study 
is made of the technique of making a decision among alternatives on 
the basis of comparative cost and suitability. A study of quality control 
methods is included. 

*IT 123— Production and Cost Control (3-0-3). Prerequisites: 
Business Administration 24 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in factory operation, including scheduling, planning and 
detailed control of production, as well as the analysis and control of 
costs of manufacturing. 

*IT 124— Time and Motion Study 3-0-3). Prerequisites: IT 121 
or approval of the instructor. 

The study of working procedures to determine the best method, 
the best human motions and the time standard or measure of human 
efficiency. 

*IT 125 — Mechanical Met hods (0-4-2). Prerequisites: Engineer- 
ing 13, Mathematics 17 or GT 115, IT 124 and Physics 14. 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
mechanisms and jig and fixture design, including actual designing of 
simple machines, jigs and fixtures. 

*IT 126— Advanced Time and Motion Study (3-0-3). Prere- 
quisite: IT 124 or approval of the instructor. 

A continuation of IT 124 designed for students specializing in 
this field. 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



86 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

*IT 127 Data Presentation 3-0-3). Prerequisite: IT 124 or 
approval of the Instructor. (CT 120 may be substituted with consent 
of instructor.) 

Problems in graphical and numerical analysis of data. Problems 
in presenting data in the most efficient and least costly form in terms 
of time required for use Simple graphs and charts, alignment charts, 
families of curves and multi-variable charts. 

*IT 128 — Personnel Motivation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Psychol- 
ogy 20. 

The course gives primary consideration to human factors in the 
design, approval and installation of personnel practices, procedures 
and systems. The case study method is used. 

Mechanical Technology 

*MT 120 — Tools and Methods (5-0-5) . Prerequisite: Physics 14. 

An introduction to the field of metal work and industrial manu- 
facturing. Possibilities and limitations of various machine tools are 
developed. The characteristics of different materials are covered as 
well as their adaptability to the various processes. Each process is 
covered from a technical viewpoint. Correst terms are introduced so 
that the student will be able to use the language of the engineer or 
technician. 

*MT 122 — Machine Shop (3-4-5). Prerequisites: Mathematics 17 
or GT 115 and Civ. T 141. 

Fundamental machine operations of drilling, reaming, turning 
between centers, chuck work, thread cutting, shaper work, layout and 
finishing. Special attention will be given to cutting speeds, tool and 
drill grinding and machine upkeep. 

*MT 123— Welding, Metallurgy and Heat Treating ^4-4-6). Pre- 
requisites: Physics 14, Chemistry 12 and Civ. T 143. 

Fundamentals of metallurgy and heat treating, including a survey 
of arc and acetylene welding. Emphasis is placed on material properties 
and the effect which alloying elements and/or heat treatment has on 
them. 

**MT 126— General Sheet Metal | 1-2-3). Prerequisite: MT 122. 
Shop problems, including layouts and methods of fabrication of 
sheet metal. 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 
**This course will be conducted at the Great Dane Trailer plant, through 
the < ooperation of Great Dane Trailers. Inc. 



( ( >l RSE DES< RIF1 IONS 



•X- 



MT 127 Industrial EUctricity(3-2~4 .Prerequisite: Physics 15. 
Basic elements of electrical circuits and machines. This will in* Lude 
series and parallel circuits, magnetism, I). C, motors and generators, 

A ( . motors, manual ami magnetic controllers. 

*MT i2S— Fluid Mechanics 5-0-5 . Prerequisites: Civ. T L43, 
( hemistry 12 and Physics 14. 

Basic principles of fluid mechanics and application to fluid flow 

and instl uinentution. 

Building Construction Technology 

BCT 121 — Graphics (3-9-6). Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

An introductory study in architectural drawing and the principles 
of visual design. This subject equips the student with a basic knowledge 
of drawing sections, plans, perspective and presentation drawing in ink. 

BCT 142 — Construction Materials and Estimates 5-2-6). 

An introduction to the materials most commonly used in the 
erection of structures, and the preparation of material and labor quan- 
tity surveys from actual working drawings and specifications. 

BCT 211 — Wood and Steel Construction 3-6-5). Prerequisite: 
Civ. T 143. 

A study of the design of beams, girders and columns in both wood 
and steel. Included is a study of the various timber fasteners, steel and 
timber trusses and steel frameworks. 

BCT 212 — Concrete Construction 3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ 
T 143. 

A study of the properties of reinforced concrete with the determi- 
nation of direct stresses and bending stresses in beams, slabs, girders 
and columns. Laboratory work consists of problems and a study of the 
methods of testing various concrete members. 

BCT 222— Building Design I 3-9-6). Prerequisites BCT 121 
and BCT 142. 

Residential Design. This subject requires of each student a com- 
plete presentation drawing, a complete set of working drawings and a 
complete set of specifications for a dwelling house. Scale models will 
be built from working drawings by groups of students. 

BCT 223— Building Design II 3-9-6 i . Prerequisites: BCT 222 
and BCT 211. 

Architectural design, working and structural drawings of more 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 






88 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

complex sti uc tines than those studied in BCT 222. Structural com- 
putations are required. 

BCT 22 1 Building Design 111 (3-9-6). Prerequisite: BCT 223. 
A continuation of BCT 223. 

BCT 243 — Building Equipment (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Physics 16. 

A brief survey of the principles of heating, ventilating, plumbing, 
air-conditioning, lighting and electric wiring of buildings from the 
construction point of view. 

BCT 231— Architectural History (3-0-3). 

A study of the progress of architecture. The material covered 
includes a review of architectural forms from early Egyptian to modern 
Engineered Architecture. 

Civil Technology 

Civ. T 121 — Elementary S urv eying (3-9-6) . Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 17 or GT 115, or concurrently. 

Construction, care and use of surveying instruments: theory and 
practice of chaining; differential and profile leveling: traversing; 
computation of areas and earthwork; theory and practice of stadia 
and its application to topographic surveying; U. S. Gov't, system of 
public land surveys; reduction and plotting of field notes; the inter- 
pretation and plotting of field notes of topographic surveys. 

Civ. T 122— Route Surveying (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Reconnaissance, preliminary location and construction surveys 
for routes of all kinds, including simple, compound and reverse curves 
used on highways and railroads; superelevation of curves; computations 
of earthwork; construction of quantity, mass and haul diagrams. For 
a final project each laboratory group must lay out a complete highway 
location with each student submitting a complete set of plans, profiles, 
cross sections and earthwork computations for this location. 

Civ. T 131 — Highway Construction (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Civ. 
T 122. 

A study of highway location, grading, drainage, surfacing, main- 
tenance and administration. 

Civ. T 141— Blueprint Reading (3-0-3). 

A study of architectural blueprints for students who must trans- 
late drawing into actual existing structures. This course is also useful 
lot students interested in general Layout of electrical, plumbing, heating 
or air-conditioning systems. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



< / 212 Structural Drafting I 0-6-2 , Prerequisite: Engi- 
neei ing 111. 

Structural sttu*l framing practices and preparation ol shop drawing 
iiu steel fabrication. 

Civ. T 213- Structural Drafting II (0-6-2). Prerequisite: Civ. I 
212. 

Preparation of detail drawings for concrete structures. 

Civ. T 223 LandSurveys 3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory and practice of land surveying; sub-divisions; filing and 
recording deeds: U. S. system of land subdivisions. U. S. Coast and 
Geodetic plane coordinate systems; county and state laws: computa- 
tions on astronomical observations for azimuth determination. Georgia 
Land Lot sytem of land subdivision. 

Civ. T 143 — Mechanics of Materials (5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Physics 14 and Mathematics 17 or GT 115. 

A study of coplanar forces and force systems, truss solutions, force 
systems in space, friction and centroids; direct stress, properties of 
materials, riveted and welded joints, torsions stresses in beams, beam 
deflection, and columns. 

Cir. T 224— Typographic and Contour Surveying (2-6-4). Pre 
requisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory, description and use of advanced surveying instruments 
and methods; practice of state and local coordinate systems for cad- 
astral surveys and construction work ; field work for the design and con- 
struction of engineering projects: use of the Plane Table on topog- 
raphic surveys; theory, description and purposes of the many types of 
maps, plans and profiles used by engineers; hydrographic surveying; 
altimetry. 

Civ. T 232— Heavy Construction (3-3-4). Prerequisite: BCT 
142. 

Heavy construction practices. This subject acquaints the student 
with the many common pieces of heavy construction equipment and 
apparatus; operation, use, limitations and maintenance of this equip- 
ment are covered along with the methods, organization and manage- 
ment for both large and small jobs. Field trips are made to construction 
projects to illustrate the usage of various pieces of equipment. 

Civ. T 241 — Hydraulics (6-0-6) . Prerequisites: Phvsics 14 and 
Civ. T 143. 

Elementary principles of hydraulics with special emphasis on 
static pressure, flow through pipes, channels, and over weirs. A survey 
of the operation of water and sewage treatment plants is included. 
Several field trips are scheduled. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Electronics and Communications Technology 

Elec. T 121 — Alternating Current Circuits I 5-3-6). Prerequis 
ites: Mathematics 16, or GT 114, Physics 15. 

Fundamentals of alternating current theory and practice as ap- 
plied to single-phase circuits. Properties of resistance, inductance and 
capacitance. Resistance networks. Generation of alternating emfs 
and elementary wave-shape analysis. Reactance, impedance and phase 
relations in series and parallel circuits. Resonant circuits. Complex 
notation, vector analysis and use of the slide rule. 

Elec. T 122 — Alternating Current Circuits II (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T 121, Mathematics 17, or GT 115. 

Advanced a-c theory and practice as applied to single-phase cir- 
cuits. Further analysis of series and parallel circuits usig complex 
notation and vestor analysis. Admittance, conductance, and suscep- 
tance. Anto-resonant circuits. Coupled-circuit theory, impedance 
transformation, transformer theory, mutual inductance and reflected 
impedance. Construction, classification, regulation, loss determination 
and efficiency of single-phase transformers. 

Elec. T 131 — Basic Electronics (5-3-6). Prerequisite: Elec. T 
121. 

Basic study of the control of free electrons in elementary electronic 
circuits. Electron emission, classification and characteristics of high- 
vacuum tubes, tube characteristics curves. Rectification, amplification, 
amplification factor, trans-conductance plate resistance, load lines, 
stage gain and basic amplifier circuits. Types of bias. Classification 
and characteristics of gas-filled, vapor-filled, and cathode ray tubes. 
Hard-tube and soft-tube voltage regulator circuits. Conversion effi- 
ciency, ripple factor and circuit analysis of single-phase, half-wave, 
full-wave and bridge rectifier circuits. 

Elec. T 223— Alternating-Current Circuits III (3-3-4). Prere- 
quisites: Elec. T 122 and Mathematics 20 or GT 120. 

Study of polyphase circuits, balanced and unbalanced, including 
circuit analysis, distribution systems, transformers and transformer 
connections, rectifier circuits and instrumentation. 

Elec. T 232 — Industrial Electronics (5-3-6). Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 122. Mathematics 20, or GT 120. Elec. T 131. 

Study of basic industrial electronic circuits and application of these 
circuits to such devices as electronic timers, voltage regulators, electro- 
static air cleaners, motoi and generator control systems, photo-electric 
systems, web and register control systems, and induction and dia- 
electric heating equipment. 



COl RSE DESCRIF1 h >NS 91 

Elec, T 233 Advanced Electronic* 1-3-4 . Prerequisites: Elec. 
I 261, or concurrently, Elec. T 2 12. 

Study of special electronic circuits, including special amplifiei 
and oscillator circuits, non-sinusoidal wave generators, pulsing cir- 
cuits, clamping, advanced stud) <>i transients, transistoi principles and 
circuitr) and servo-mechanisms. 

Elec. T 241 Communications Circuits I 5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Physics 15. 

Study of the operating principles of telephone equipment and 
circuits. Local-battery and common battery manual exchanges, step- 
by-step and all-relay automatic exchanges. Basic relay circuits for 
digital control. Matched transmission lines for audio frequencies, dis- 
tributed and lumped line constants, pads and attenuators, constant-k 
and m-derived filters for low-pass, high-pass, band-pass and band- 
elimination. "Pi", "T", and %4 LL" sections. 

Elec. T 242 — Communications Circuits II (5-3-6). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T 261, or concurrently. 

High-frequency transmission line concepts and practical applica- 
tions. Impedence-matching concepts and methods, transmission-line 
circle diagram, propagation, standing waves, basic antenna theory, 
antennas for low-frequency and high-frequency applications, and high- 
frequency measuring techniques. 

Elec. T 243 — Communications Circuits III (3-3-4). Prerequis- 
ites: Elec. T 233 and Elec. T 242. 

Microwave techniques, theory and practice in pulse circuits, ultra- 
high-frequency amplifiers, transit-time effects, wave guides and cavity 
resonators, dynatrons, transitions, klystrons and magnetrons. Prin- 
ciples of radar, types of scan, radar transmitting and receiving systems. 
synchronization, and specific study of ASG-1 and APS-3 radar systems. 

Elec. T 254 — Electrical Machinery (2-3-3). Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 223, or concurrently. 

Survey of electrical rotating machines, direct and alternating 
current. Construction, characteristics, operation and control and in- 
dustrial applications of d-c, single-phase, a-c and polyphase a-c motors 
and generators. 

Elec. T 261 — Communications Technology I (5-3-6). Prere- 
quisites: Elec. T 241, Elec. T 232. 

The study of voltage amplification as applied to radio-frequency 
and audio-frequency circuits. Analysis of amplifier circuits and coup- 
ling methods, radio-frequency tuning circuits, regeneration and gen- 
eration circuits, decoupling networks and basic oscillator circuits. 
Construction, tuning, and alignment of superheterodyne receivers. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Elec. T 262. — Communications Technology II (5-3-6). Prere- 
quisites: Elec. T 233, Elec. T 261. 

Advanced study of radio communication circuits. Amplitude- 
modulated transmitters, power amplifiers, phase inverters, push-pull 
amplifiers and modulator circuits. Broadcast studio techniques, re- 
corders, and recording and control room equipment. 

Elec. T 263 — Television Technology (3-3-4). Prerequisite: Elec. 
I 233, Elec. T 262. 

Principles of frequency modulation, methods of modulation and 
demodulation, FM transmitter and receiver circuits. Federal Com- 
munications Commission standards for television transmission. Camera 
and picture tubes, composite video signal, television receiver circuits, 
power supplies, video amplifiers, deflection circuits, alignment pro- 
cedures,, transmitters circuits and color television. 






INDIA 

Absences 1 1 

Admission to Glass \2 

Admission to College 16-21 

Admission of Veterans 21 

Administration 6 

Admission by Transfer Advanced Standing 19-21 

Advisement and Placemenl rests 31 

Advisei 37 

\iins 15-16 

Ait. Course Descriptions 57 

Associate Degree 22 

Athletics 27-28. 31 

Attendance Regulations 34 

Audio-Visual Instruction 26 

Biology, Course Descriptions 57-59 

Board of Regents 5 

Botany 57-58 

Building Construction Technology. Course Descriptions 87-88 

Building Construction Technology Program 52 

Business Administration, Course Descriptions 59-62 

Business Administration, Senior College Preparatory 38 

Business Administration, Terminal 46-48 

Business Administration, 1-Year Program 48 
Business Administration, 3-Year Programs: 

Accounting 45 

General 46 

Transportation 47 

Calendar— 1959-1960 3-4 

Civil Technology, Course Descriptions 81-92 

Civil Technology Programs 52-56 

Chemical Technology. Course Descriptions 83-84 

Chemical Technology Programs 53-54 

Chemistry. Course Descriptions 62 

College Commission 6 

College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test 16-17 

Commencement Exercises 22 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 62-64 

Commerce, Secretarial. Terminal 48 

Commerce, Stenographic 48-49 

Conduct 32 

Constitutions: Examinations 36 

Counseling 21-22 

Course Load 32 

Course Descriptions 57-92 

93 



INDEX (Continued) 

C -iii riculums : 

Senioi College Preparatory Programs 38-45 

Technical Institute Programs 52-56 

Terminal Programs 45-52 

1 v. m\ List l See Honors 33 

Degrees 35 

I )ismissa] From ( lollege 35 

Dramatics Masquers 28 

Economics, Course Descriptions 64-66 

Education, Course Descriptions 66 

Electrical Technology, Course Descriptions 90-92 

Electronics and Communications Technology 56 

Engineering, Senior College Preparatory 38 

Engineering, Course Descriptions . 66-67 

English, Course Descriptions _ 67-68 

Entrance Requirements 16-21 

Evening College . 28-29 

Expenses 22-25 

Faculty 7-1 1 

Fees .. 22-25 

Forestry, Senior College Preparatory 39 

French, Course Descriptions 69 

General Educational Development Tests 17-21 

General Information 15-30 

General Regulations 31-36 

Geography, Course Descriptions 69 

German, Course Descriptions 69 

Glee Club 28 

Grades ..... 32-33 

Graduation, Requirements for 35-36 

Health, Course Descriptions 70 

History of the College 15 

History, Course Descriptions 70 

Hodgson Hall 25-26 

Holidays . .... 3-4 

Home Economics, Course Descriptions 71 

Home Economics, Senior College Preparatory 39 

Home Economics, Terminal 49 

Honors 33 

Human Biology 58 

Human Relations, Terminal 49-50 

Incomplete Grades. Makeup of 32-33 

Industrial Management 39 

Industrial Technology, Course Descriptions 85-86 

Industrial Technology Program 54 

94 



INDIA Continued) 

1 ate Registration Fee 

Libera] Aits. Senioi College Preparatory K3 

Libera] Ai ts, 1 erminal 50 

Libera] Arts, 3-Year Program ~> (| 

Library 25-26 

Load of Work 32 

Masquers 28 

Mathematics, Course Description^ 72-71^ 

Mathematics, Senior College Preparatory 40 

Medical Technologists, Savannah School of 51 

Medical Technology, Seniqi College Preparatory 40-41 

Medical Technology, Terminal 51 

Music See Glee Club) 28 

Music, Course Descriptions 73-74 

Night School (see Evening College) 28-29 

Non-Resident Fee 23 

Nursing 43 

Organization of the College 15 

Orientation and Advisement 21-22 

Pharmacy 44 

Philosophy. Course Descriptions 74-75 

Physical Education Program 27,31 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 75 

Physical Education, Senior College Preparatory 41 

Physical Examination 31 

Physical Science, Course Descriptions 76 

Physics, Course Descriptions 76-77 

Physics, Senior College Preparatory 42 

Placement Service . 27 

Placement Tests 31 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 77 

Pre-Dental, Senior College Preparatory 42 

Pre-Medical, Senior College Preparatory 42 

Pre-Nursing, Senior College Preparatory 43 

Pre-Optometry, Senior College Preparatory 43 

Pre-Pharmacy, Senior College Preparatory 44 

Pre-Veterinary, Senior College Preparatory 44 

Probation Regulation 35 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 78-79 

Publications 28 

Radio Work Shop (see Masquers) 28 

Recommendations 36 

Refunds 25 

Regents, Board of 5 

Regulations — General 31-36 

95 






INDEX (Continued) 

Reports and Grades 32-33 

Requirements for Admission 16-21 

Requirements for Graduation 35-36 

Scholarships 26-27 

Secretarial, 2- Year Program 48 

Senior College Courses 30 

Shorthand and Typing 48-49. 62-64 

Social Science, Contemporary Georgia 79 

Sociology, Course Descriptions 79-81 

Spanish, Course Descriptions 81 

Speech 68 

Stenographic, 1-Year Program 48-49 

Student Activities 27 

Student Assistants 26 

Student Center 27 

Student Publications 28 

Summer School Calendar 3-4 

Teaching, Senior College Preparatory 44-45 
Technical Institute, Course Descriptions: 

Building Construction 87-88 

Chemical 83-84 

Civil 88-89 

Electrical 90-92 

General 82 

Industrial 85-86 

Technical Institute Programs 29, 52-56 

Television Workshop see Masquers) 28 

Transfer, Admission by 19-21 

Transfer to Other Institutions 37 

Transfer Students 19-21 

Transportation, Terminal Programs 47 

Warren A. Candler School of Nursing 43 

Withdrawal from College 34-35 

Withdrawal Schedule 25 

Work. Normal Load of 32 

Zoology, Courses in 58 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



96 



& 






316 OZ 
AH 35 






L>e£jLQ^ 



L960-1961 






y 




SUM MLR 



FALL 



WINTKR 



spring 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 
Savannah, Georgia 



A Unit of the University System 
of Georgia 




16 

Membership in 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XXV 



NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR 1960-61 

SUMMER SESSION, 1960 

Last da) to file Application foi Admission Monday, \\,w 2 I I960 

Registration Monday. June 13 L:00 to 8:00 I'M 

Tuesday, June 1 1 1:00 to 8:00 I'M 
Classes begin Wednesday, June 15. I960 

Mid-Term reports due Monday. July 11, 1960 

Examinations Thursday and Friday, August 4-5, 1960 

FALL QUARTER, I960 

Last day to file Application for Admission Friday. August 26. 1960 

Freshman testing and sophomore counseling 

9:00 AM Monday. September 12, 1960 

Freshman orientation and Day School registration Tuesday. September 13, 1960 

Registration ' Friday. September 16. 1960—1:00 PM to 8:00 PM 

Registration Monday. September 19. 1960—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 

Classes begin Monday. September 19, 1960 

Mid-Term reports due Friday, October 28, 1960 

Pre-registration for Winter Quarter (Wed. thru Fri.) November 2-4, 1960 

Thanksgiving holidays (Thurs. thru Sun.) November 24-27. 1960 

Examinations (Wed. thru Fri.) December 7-9. 1960 

HOMECOMING: 

Basketball game Saturday, December 3. 1960 

Dance .... Monday. December 26, 1960 

Christmas Holidays (Sat. thru Sun.) December 10. 1960- January 1. 1961 

WINTER QUARTER, 1961 

Last day to file Application for Admission Monday. December 12. 1960 

Registration Monday. January 2. 1961—9:00 AM to 1 : 00 PM 

And 2 : 00 PM to 5 : 00 PM 

Registration Tuesday. January 3, 1961 — 1 :00 PM to 8 :00 PM 

Classes begin Tuesday. January 3. 1961 

Mid-Term reports due Friday. February 3. 1961 

Pre-registration for Spring Quarter (Wed. thru Fri.) February 8-10 

Examinations (Mon. thru Wed.) March 20-22 

Spring Holidays (Thurs. thru Sun.) March 23-26 



SPRING QUARTER, 1961 



Last day to file Application for Admission Tuesday, March 7, 1961 

Registration Monday, March 27—9:00 AM to 1:00 PM 

and 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM 
Tuesday, March 28—9:00 AM to 8:00 PM 
Classes begin Tuesday, March 28, 1961 

Holiday (Good Friday) Friday, March 31, 1961 

Mid-Term reports due Friday. April 28, 1961 

Pre-registration for summer and fall quarter 

Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, May 3-5. 1961 
Examinations Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday, June 5-7, 1961 

Graduation Monday, June 12, 1961 

SUMMER SESSION, 1961 

Last day to file Application for Admission Wednesday. May 24, 1961 

Registration Wednesday and Thursday, June 14-15, 1961 

Classes begin Friday, June 16, 1961 

Mid-Term reports due Friday. July 14, 1961 

Examinations Wednesday and Thursday. August 9-10. 1961 



Regents, University System of Georgia 

244 Washington Street, s.W. Fourth Flooi 
\ 1 LANTA 



District 



Regent 



State .it Large James A. Dunlap 

February I () I960 January 1. 1967 

St. itc .it Large Allen Woodall 

February 13, 1957 January 1. 1964 

State at Large Roy V. Harris 

February 19. 1960— January 1. 1967 

State at Large— Quimby Melton, Jr. 

February 14. 1956— January 1. 1963 

State at Lame Carey Williams 

January 1. 1955— January 1. 1962 

First — Everett Williams 

January 13. 1955— January 1. 1962 

Second — John I. Spooner 

January 1. 1954 — January 1. 1961 

Third — Howard H. Callaway 

January 1. 1958— January 1. 1965 

Fourth — Robert O. Arnold 

January 1. 1956 — January 1. 1963 

Fifth— David F. Rice 

January 1. 1954 — January 1, 1961 

Sixth — Linton D. Baggs. Jr. 

July 8. 1957— January 1. 1964 

Seventh — Ernest L. Wright 

February 6. 1959— January 1. 1966 

Eighth — James D. Gould 

February 13. 1957— January 1. 1964 

Ninth — Morris M. Bryan, Jr. 

February 3. 1959— January 1. 1966 

Tenth— W. Roscoe Coleman 

January 1. 1958— January 1. 1965 



A (I tli > 
( rainesville 

( Solumbus 

Augusta 

Griffin 

Greensboro 

Statesboro 

Donalsonville 

Pine Mountain 

Covington 

Atlanta 

Macon 

Rome 

Brunswick 

Jefferson 

Augusta 



Officers of the Board of Regents 



Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Chancellor 

Executive Secretary 
Treasurer 



Robert O. Arnold 

Everett Williams 

Harmon W. Caldwell 

L. R. Siebert 

James A. Blissit 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



The Armstrong College Commission 

The Commission controls certain endowment funds and scholar- 
ship funds which have been contributed by local citizens over a period 
of years. It serves also in an advisory capacity to the colic-" 

Hkrschkl V. Jenkins, Honorary Chairman 
Dr. Irving Victor Chairman 

Joseph H. Harrison Vice-Chairman 

Edward J. Bartlett, H. Lee Fulton, Jr., 

Ex-Officio Ex-Officio 

Lawton M. Calhoun, Arthur I. Jeffords, Jr. 

Ex-Officio Victor B. Jenkins 

Dr. H. Y. Charbonnier Leon McCormac, 

Grady L. Dickey Ex-Officio 

W. Lee Mingledorff, Jr., Ex-Officio 

Office of the President 



Foreman M. Havves, A.B., M.S. 
Marjorie A. Mosley, A. A. 



President 

Administrative Assistant 

and Secretary to the President 



Evening Program 



Marv H. Strong, A.B. 
Helen Meighen 



Director 
Secretary 



Office of the Comptroller 



JULE C. ROSSITER, A. A. 

Norma Jean Callow ay 
Elizabeth S. Dixon 



Comptroller 
Clerical Assistant 
Clerical Assistant 



Office of the Registrar 

Jack H. Padgett, A.B., M.A.. Registrar & Director of Admissions 

Nellie Hankins Schmidt, B.A. Assistant Registrar 

Elizabeth O. Hitt Assistant to the Registrar 

Minnie McG. Campbell Veterans' Affairs Officer 

Bertis Jones Clerical Assistant 

Elizabeth Howard Clerical Assistant 



Student Personnel Services 



M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B.. M.A. 
Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., M.A. 
1 Ii NRii i i a All 



Coordinator 
Psychologist 

Secretary 



ADMINISTRATE >.\ 



Librarj 

R\ in Peck Smith, A.B., B.S. in L.S. Librarian 

Ei i \ \i oi \i Clancy Assistant to tin Librarian 

[ames Bis son Assistant to the Librarian 

Other Personnel 

Angi i \ McBridi P.B.X. Operator 

Sara Beth Tuten P.B.X. Operator 

Mary Elizabeth Poind Manager, Student Centei 

and Book Store 
J. Allen Seay Supt. of Grounds and Buildings 

Joi McNeelYj Jr. Assistant Supt. of Grounds and Buildings 

The Faculty 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Graduate 
Study. Cambridge University 

English 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A.. University 
of Georgia; Graduate Study, Emory University 

Chairman, Social Science Department 
History 

-Stephen P. Bond, B.S. in Architecture, Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Engineering Drawing 

B. Ransom Bradford, A.B., Emory University; Graduate Study, 
Emory University 

English 

William E. Covle, A.B., Emory University; M.A.. Georgetown Uni- 
versity 

History and Political Science 

Leslie B. Davenport, B.S., College of Charleston: M.S.. Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; Graduate Study, University of Georgia 
Chairman, Biology Department 

Lamar W. Davis. B.S. and M.S.. University of South Carolina; Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Chairman, Business Administration and Commerce Department 
Business Administration 



*Part time. 



8 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

W. {Catherine Dean, H.s. . University of Tenn< 

Physical Education 

*Angel Del Bi >i<>. Artist's Diploma. Julliard School of Music; Mus. 
1).. Zoellner Conservatory 

Woodwind Instruments 

Josephine Simmons Denmark, B.S.. Georgia Southern College: 
M.S. in Home Economics. University of Georgia; Graduate Study, 
Texas Woman's University 

Chairman, Home Economics Department 

John L. M. des Islets, Col. (Ret.), B.S.. United States Military 
Academy 

Chairman, Physics and Physical Science Department 

Stratos George Dukakis, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University 
of Massachusetts 

Engineering Drawing 

Rossiter C. Durfee, A.B., M.A., Stanford University 

English 

^Hartley Barrett Eckerson, B.S., M.S.. University of Tennes 

Mathematics 

Jack B. Fowler, A.B.. University of Georgia: M.A.. George Peahod\ 
College for Teachers 

English 

Albert Gordon, A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina 
English and Director of the Masquers 

*Theodore HenklEj Julliard School of Music. Pupil of Leopold Auer 

I 'iolin 

Daniel J. Hook, A.B., Newberry College; M.A.. Columbia University; 
Graduate Study. University of South Carolina and the University 
of Kansas 

Mathematics 

**Lutrecia Adams Hintf.r. B.S. and M.A.. George Peabodv College 
for Teachers 

Acting Chairman, Mathematics Department 

Ted L. Hunter, B. A.. University of Florida; Graduate Study. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Psychology and Sociology 



*Part time. 

*Rrsitrned. 



ADMIMsl R VI ION 



Essn 1 ). Ji n kins, Owensboro Business College, Kentucky 

Typing 

Margarei Spencer Li bs, B.M., Cohmisc College; A.B., University 
of Georgia; M.A.. Columbia University 

Chairman, Humanities Department; English and French 

[ohn Hugh McTeer, A.B., M.A. in Education, University of South 
C Sarolina 

History and Education 

Francis (>. Mi mo, B.S., George Washington University; Graduate 
Study, Clemson College and Emory University 

Chairman. Chemistry Department 

J whs Harry Persee. B.F.A., University of Georgia: Master of Music, 
Florida State University 

Music, Faculty Advisor for Student Activities 

Norman Ray Ri.mley, B.S., University of Georgia: Graduate Study, 
University of Georgia 

Psychology 

Robert B. H. Rockwell, Gol. Ret.). B.S. in Electrical Engineering. 
Georgia Institute of Technology 

Physics 

Roy Jesse Sims, B.S., David Lipscomb College: M. S., Universiu of 
Tennessee 

Chairman, Physical Education Department 
Basketball Coach 

Frank P. Siyik, B.S., Providence College; M.S.. University of Massa- 
chusetts: Graduate Study. North Carolina State College 
Botany and Biology 

Julia Floyd Smith. B.S.. M.A., Florida State University 
Sociology and History 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., M.A., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Chairman, Mathematics Department 

Carol Dysart Tapp, B.S., University of Tennessee 

Shorthand and Comptometer 

Lawrence M. Tapp, B.S., University of Tennessee: Graduate Study. 
University of Tennessee 

Physical Education for Men 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Dorothy M. THOMPSON j A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., North - 
western University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Western 
Resen e Uni\ ersity 

Psychology and Sociology 

William Livingston Travis, Col. (Ret.), B.S., United States Mili- 
tary Academy; LL.B., George Washington School of Law 

Chairman, Technical Instituh 
Physical Science and Engineering Draii ing 

Anthony M. Warren, B.A. and Graduate Study. Tulane University 

English 

Mildred Aleen Williams, B.S. Western Carolina College; Graduate 
Study. Clemson College 

Chemistry 

William Swoll Winn, B.D.. A.B., Emory University; M.A.. Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 

Mathematics 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAM INSTRUCTORS FOR 

COURSES OFFERED AT UNION BAG-CAMP 

PAPER CORPORATION 

Ellis O. Barnes, B. Ch. E., University of Louisville 

C. Duncan Blake, B.S., Master of Forestry, Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 

John C. Bowers, B.S. in Ch. E., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 
in Ch. E.j Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

George L. Brannen, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology 

Ivan H. Carr, Jr., B.S. in Industrial Engineering. University of Florida 

Ernest Clifton, B.S. in Mech. E.. Georgia Institute of Technology 

Robert J. Cummings, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering, University 
of Florida: Master of Science in Engineering. University of Florida 

David Donald. B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Georgia Institute of 

Technology 

Robert W. Gray, Bachelor of Arts. Kings College 

Everett J. Harriman, B.S. in Chemical Engineering. University of 
Maine; M.S. in Pulp and Papei Technology. University of Maine 

[ames A. Henderson, Bachelor of Industrial Engineering. University 

of Florida 



ADMINIS I RA riON 11 

Herman 1. I.i rcHWORTHj Journeyman Machinist, Methods and 
Machine Design 

James C. McKee, Bachelor of Forestry, Stephen F. Austin College; 
Mastei «<t Forestry, Duke University 

[ohn J. Owen, Jr.. B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Louisiana Stato 
University 

(Kiin H. Reagan, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, University <>f 
Tennessee 

David W. Ki in. B.S. in Chemical Engineering, North Carolina Stan 
University 

Calvin S. Schlessman, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Carnegie In- 
stitute of Technology 

John Toland. B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. Georgia Institute of 
Technology 

The following is a resolution adopted by the Board 

of Regents at its meeting held in Atlanta, 

Georgia on March 12, 1958 

"RESOLVED. That the requirements for admission to the various 
institutions of the University Svstem of Georgia be amended so that 
the following additional requirements must be met: 

1. Any resident of Georgia applying for admission to an insti- 
tution of the University System of Georgia shall be required 
to submit certificates from two citizens of Georgia, alumni of 
the institution that he desires to attend, on prescribed forms, 
which shall certify that each of such alumni is personally 
acquainted with the applicant and the extent of such acquaint- 
ance, that the applicant is of good moral character, bears a 
good reputation in the community in which he resides, and. 
in the opinion of such alumnus, is a fit and suitable person 
for admission to the institution and able to pursue successfully 
the courses of study offered by the institution he desire^ to 
attend. 

Provided, however, that any applicant who seeks admission to 
an institution with an enrollment less than 1000 students and 
who lives in a country in which no alumnus of the institution 
he wishes to attend resides, may furnish a certificate from the 
Judge of the Superior Court of his circuit in lieu of the 
certificate from alumni. In such a case the certificate of the 
Judge of the Superior Court shall set forth the same facts 
that the alumni certificate must contain in other cases. 



12 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Each such applicant shall also submit a certificate from the 
Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court of the county in 
which the applicant resides that such applicant is a bona fide 
resident of such county, is of good moral character and bears 
i good reputation in the community in which he resides. How- 
ever, any applicant who lives in a county having a population 
of 100,000 or more, may submit in lieu of the certificate from 
the Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court a certificate, on 
a prescribed form, from a third alumnus of the institution 
that applicant desires to attend. This third alumnus shall be 
one of those on a list of alumni designated by the president 
of the alumni association of the institution to assist the insti- 
tution in its efforts to select students of character, aptitude, 
and ability and to obtain corroborating evidence regarding the 
place of residence of such students. The certificate of the 
third alumnus in counties with a population of 100,000 or more 
shall set forth the facts required in the certificate from the 
Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court. 

2. Any non-resident of the State applying for admission to an 
institution of the University System of Georgia shall submit 
a similar certificate from two alumni of the institution that he 
desires to attend, or from two reputable citizens of the com- 
munity in which the applicant resides. Every such applicant 
shall also submit a certificate from a judge of a court of record 
of the county, parish, or other political sub-division of the 
State in which he resides that he is a bona fide resident of such 
county, parish, or other political sub-division and a person of 
good moral character and bears a good reputation in the com- 
munity in which he resides. 

3. There is reserved to every institution of the University System 
of Georgia the right to require any applicant for admission to 
take appropriate intelligence and aptitude tests in order that 
the institution may have information bearing on the appli- 
cant's ability to pursue successfully courses of study for which 
the applicant wishes to enroll and the right to reject any appli- 
cant who fails to satisfactorily meet such tests. 

4. There is reserved to every institution of the University System 
of Georgia the right to determine the sufficiency of any certifi- 
cate required by this resolution: the right to determine whether 
any applicant has met the requirements for admission as set 
forth by this resolution, or otherwise, and is a fit and suitable 
person for admission to such institution. There is also reserved 
the right to reject the application of any person who has not 
been a bona fide resident of Georgia for more than twelve 
months. 



ADMIMM K \l ION 1 I 



It it shall appear to the presidenl 01 othei propei authority 
oi .m\ institution oi tin- University System oi Georgia that the 

educational needs of an) applicant for admission to that insti- 
tution can best In- met at some other institution ol the I nivei- 

Mt\ System, he may refer the application to the Board of 
Regents tor consideration, lot reference <>i assignment to such 

Other institution. 

This resolution shall become effective immediately and cata- 
logs of all institutions of tin- University System shall cany 
these requirements. Catalogs already printed shall carry inserts 
or addenda showing these requirements. The 1 foregoing require- 
ments shall apply to all applicants who have applied for ad- 
mission to any institution of the University System of Georgia, 
but have not been actually enrolled and admitted, and to all 
applicants who hereafter make application for admission to 
any such institution. 

All alumni, ordinaries and clerks of the superior courts, called 
upon or requested to execute certificates on behalf of appli- 
cants for admission to any institution under any paragraph 
as hereinbefore provided, shall, with respect to certifications as 
to good moral character, reputation, fitness and suitability for 
admission to the institution, and ability to pursue successfully 
the courses of study therein, be guided and controlled by the 
following standards : 

(a) Age of the applicant. 

(b) Past educational record, academic achievements, and 
overall scholastic ability of the applicant. 

(c) Temperament, demeanor and attitude of the applicant. 

(d) Any past criminal record of the applicant or other dis- 
ciplinary problems. 

(e) Sobriety. 

I Martial status, and all other similar obligations. 

(g) Financial ability of the applicant to successfully defray 
all school and living expenses. 

(h) Physical and mental fitness — any nervous or other phy- 
sical defects or disorders. 

(i) Any military service record of the applicant. 

(j ) The general reputation of the applicant in the community 
in which he or she resides, as the same may be known 
to such alumnus, ordinarv, or clerk, or as mav be made 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



known by recommendations or testimonials from persons 
known to such alumnus, ordinary or clerk to be reliable/' 

This 28th day of October, 1958. 

s/s L. R. Siebertj Executive Secretary 
Regents of the University System 
of Georgia. 



The Board of Regent at its meeting on April 22, 1959, approved 
the following regulations regarding classification of students as resi- 
dents and non-residents of the State for fee purposes: 

RESOLVED, That the Board of Regents of the University 
system of Georgia shall and it does hereby declare that in order to 
register as a legal resident of Georgia at an institution of the Uni- 
versity System, a student must establish the following facts to the 
satisfaction of the registering officer: 

1. A student who is under 21 years of age at the time he seeks 
to register or re-register at the beginning of any quarter will 
be accepted as a resident student only upon a showing by him 
that his supporting parent or guardian has been a bona fide 
resident of Georgia for a period of at least twelve months im- 
mediately preceding the date of registration or re-registration. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 
the guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not be 
permitted to register as a resident student until the expiration 
of one year from the date of the appointment, and then only 
upon proper showing that such appointment was not made to 
avoid the non-resident fee. 

3. If a student is over 21 years of age, he must show that bona 
fide residence in Georgia was established at least one year prior 
to the registration date. Any period of time during which a 
person is enrolled as a student in an educational institution 
in Georgia may not be counted as a part of the year's residence 
herein required when it appears that the student came into the 
State and remained in the State for the primary purpose of 
attending a school or college." 



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General Information 

History and Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on May 27, 1935. 
by the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Savannah to meet a long- 
felt need for a junior college. The first college building was the 
magnificent home of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city 
from his widow and his daughter. The former home, now called the 
Armstrong Building, is an imposing structure of Italian Rennaissance 
Architecture; inside, its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air 
of dignity: while outside it is one of the beautiful college buildings in 
the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropria- 
tion, the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four addi- 
tional buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, 
prominent banker; John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which arc 
located the Student Center, the Home Economics Program, class- 
rooms and the Dancing Studio; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, which 
contains the auditorium and theater for the Armstrong College Mas- 
quers and classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most 
beautiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one 
of the carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whi taker Street, 
contains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia 
Historical Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college was under the administrative control of the Armstrong 
College Commission until January 1, 1959. On this date the institu- 
tion became a unit in the University System of Georgia and under 
the control of the State Board of Regents. 

Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community by giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet 
the obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student may complete one or more of the following specific 
objectives. 

1. Complete the freshman and sophomore years ot the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree; 

2. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading 
toward medicine, dentistry, law. home economics, the 
ministry and other professions; 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 



3. Graduate from a semi-professional program, pre- 
pared to gO into business or industry; 

1. ( Somplete two years of an engineering program which 
is transferable for credit to colleges ol engineering; 

5. Complete a two-yeai technical institute program; 

6. Obtain two years of learning in fields that will enrich 
personal and social living. 

The college awards an associate degree to students completing 
an approved program. 

Admission to the College 

Scholastic & Personal Requirements 

An applicant planning to enter Armstrong College will obtain 
from the Director of Admissions an "Application for Admission" form. 
Completion of all application forms and of all requirements con- 
tained therein is required of each applicant before his request for 
admission can be considered. No application forms will be considered 
unless received by the date prescribed in the calendar set forth on 
page 3, which is in each case at least twenty (20) days prior 
to the first day of registration. Armstrong College reserves the right 
to terminate receipt of application forms when enrollment limits are 
reached. 

The applicant will request the high school principal, or the 
college registrar (in the case of a transfer student) to send a trans- 
script of credits to the Director of Admissions, Armstrong College of 
Savannah, Savannah, Georgia. 

The Director of Admissions will notify the applicant that he has 
been admitted if he meets the minimum requirements for admission 
listed below. 

1. The applicant must be at least sixteen years of age and of 
established moral character. Armstrong College reserves the right to 
examine and investigate the moral worth, character, and personality 
of the applicant. 

2. The College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test is required of all applicants for admission including those who 
have had previous college work, except as noted in paragraph 1 under 
Transfer Students, page 20. The results of the tests must be filed with 
the Director of Admissions before the application can be considered. 
In order that the scores may be received in time for evaluation, the 
applicant must follow the testing schedule below : 

For Summer Quarter, 1960 — take test on 
December 5, 1959, January 9, 1960, 
February 6. 1960 or March 12. 1960. 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

For Fall Quarter, 1960 — take test on 
December 5, 1959, January 9, 1960, 
February 6, 1960, March 12, 1960, or 
May 21, 1960. 

For Winter Quarter, 1960 — take test on 
May 21, 1960 or August 10, 1960. 
For Spring Quarter, 1960 — take test on 
December 3, 1960 or January 14, 1961. 

The high school principal, counsellor, or the Director of Admis- 
sions of Armstrong College will supply the necessary information for 
making application to take the College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test; or the applicant may write directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 592, Princeton, New 
Jersey. Please note that application must be made to the College 
Entrance Examination Board one month prior to the testing dates 
listed above. 

3. The applicant must meet at least one of the following re- 
quirements: 

a. Graduation from an accredited high school. 

b. Have credit in a minimum of 16 units, as specified 
in section 4, below, from an accredited high school. 
The applicant in this category must meet further 
qualifications determined by the Admissions Commit- 
tee. 

c. Acceptable scores on the General Educational De- 
velopment Tests (high school level). An overall 
average of 45 with no score less than 35 is required to 
qualify for a State High School Equivalency Certifi- 
cate. An applicant twenty years of age or over, who is 
not a graduate of an accredited high school, may take 
the General Educational Development Tests (high 
school level). These tests comprise five (5), two (2) 
hour examinations and must be completed two weeks 
prior to registration. Additional information may be 
obtained from the office of the Director of Admis- 
sions. 

4. Beginning with the Fall quarter of 1960, a minimum of 16 
units from an accredited high school will be required in the fields 
listed below: 

English 4 

"^Mathematics 2 or 3 (One must be in Algebra) 

•As most senior colleges require two (2) units of Algebra and one (1 unit 
of Plane Geometry for admission to degree programs in Engineering and/or 
Science, students planning to enter these fields are strongly urged to present 
these three (3) units in mathematics for admission to Armstrong College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 19 

Social Studies 2 

Natural Sciences 2 

Other academic units 4 

Othei 2 or 1 

Armstrong College reserves the right to reject the credits from 
any high school or other institution notwithstanding its accredited 
status, where the college determines either from investigation or other- 
wise, that the quality of instruction available at such high school <>i 
institution is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. 

5. Applicants who qualify under the terms of Numbers 3 and 4 
above must also have a predicted grade point average (based on high 
school record. College Entrance Examination Board scores, and other 
pertinent data as determined by the Admissions Committee of Arm- 
strong College) which indicates that the applicant has the potential 
to pursue effectively the educational program of Armstrong College 

6. If the application forms, College Entrance Examination Hoard 
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, and properly transmitted records of 
the applicant are found to be complete and in proper order and the 
grades and scores indicate that the candidate is eligible for considera- 
tion, the applicant will be informed that his application for admis- 
sion has been tentatively accepted. 

He will then be directed by the Admissions Officer to appeal 
at Armstrong College for personal testing and interview. Appoint- 
ments will be made as soon as possible after his application for ad- 
mission has been tentatively accepted. Testing and interview must 
be completed prior to the first day of Orientation Week or prior to 
the first day of Registration, whichever is the earlier date. Appli- 
cants are urged to take advantage of the earliest date for testing and 
interview as final acceptance cannot be given until this process is 
completed. 

At this time, every applicant will be evaluated in terms of his 
test scores and grades, scholastic aptitude, social and psychological 
adjustment, and the probability of his completing the requirements 
for a college degree. 

In reviewing the application, the interviewing representative of 
Armstrong College shall consider all examination scores, scholastic 
records, personal data, and the applicant's ability to make the social 
and psychological adjustment to the college environment. Each appli- 
cant must give evidence of sturdiness of character, promise of growth, 
seriousness of purpose, and a sense of social responsibility. Armstrong 
College reserves the right, in every case, to reject any applicant whose 
general records and attitude do not prognosticate success in Armstrong 
College notwithstanding the completion of other requirements. Arm- 
strong College reserves the right further to test any applicant ex- 
tensively by the use of psychological, achievement, and aptitude tests. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

7. The Admissions Committee shall review any application di- 
rected to it by the Director of Admissions for total study and subse- 
quent recommendation to the Director of Admissions. 

8. Acceptance or rejection of each and every application will 
be determined by the Director of Admissions, subject to the right of 
appeal as provided in the Faculty Statutes of Armstrong College and 
the by-laws of the Board of Regents of the University System. 

9. APPLICATION FORM DEPOSIT: A validating deposit of 
$15.00 must accompany each complete application form before it can 
be given official consideration. This deposit does not bind Armstrong 
College to admit the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance of the 
applicant's qualifications. If the applicant is admitted, the deposit 
will be applied towards tuition for the quarter following acceptance. 
The deposit will be refunded to the applicant if he is not eligible 
for admission. If the applicant wishes to withdraw his application, 
the deposit will be refunded if the applicant does not register and if 
the refund is requested in writing twenty 20) days prior to the first 
day of registration. Any student who withdraws during the first quarter 
of his attendance shall have his admission deposit deducted before any 
computation is made of the refund to which he may be entitled. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

1. Students who desire to transfer to Armstrong College from 
another college in the University System of Georgia will not be re- 
quired to present scores of the College Entrance Examination Boards' 
Scholastic Aptitude Test. Those students who transfer from college^ 
outside of the University System of Georgia will be required to pre- 
sent scores of the College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic 
Aptitude Test unless they have satisfactorily completed the equivalent 
of two years of college work | 90 quarter hours ) . In every other respect, 
transfer students must comply with admission requirements of entering 
freshmen. 

Transfer students whose applications for admission have been 
tentatively accepted will be expected to appear for personal testing 
and interviews on dates specified by the Director of Admissions. 
Testing and interviews must be completed prior to the first day of 
Orientation Week or prior to the first day of registration, whichevei 
is the earlier date. Applicants are urged to take advantage of the 
earliest date for testing and interview as final acceptance cannot be 
given until this process is completed. 

2. Transfer students should refer to the foregoing information 
relative to the admissions procedures, requirements, and dates of 
filing the completed application with the Office o\ the Director of 
Admissions. 



(JKNKRAL IMORM.VI [ON 21 



rransfei applicants must comply with th<- policy oi the Board 
of Regents in furnishing the certificate found in the official appli- 
cation for admission form. 

4. The applicant must request that official transcripts showing 
evidence of studies pursued at all other colleges or universities l>< 

sent to the Director of Admissions. These transcripts must furnish 
.1 statement of honorable dismissal. Completion of ALL application 
forms is required of each applicant for admission by transfer from 
other institutions before his request for admission can be considered 
It should be understood that only those applicants will be admitted 
whose past records indicate a favorable prospect of successful study 
with the faculty and with the other students in college. Every transfer 
student seeking admission will be evaluated for aptitude, achieve- 
ment, motivation, social and psychological adjustment, scholastic per- 
formance and probability of completing the requirements for a degree. 

5. Armstrong College reserves the right to deny admission to 
any student transferring to Armstrong College when, in the opinion 
of the Director of Admissions, the academic standards or the admis- 
sion procedures of the institution (s) previously attended are not 
equivalent or comparable to those existing at Armstrong College. 

6. When a transfer applicant's qualifications are in question, 
the Director of Admissions, at his discretion, will refer the application 
in totality to the Admissions Committee for its review and recom- 
mendations. However, the final determination of the applicant's 
eligibility for admission to the College will be made by the Director 
of Admissions. 

7. Acceptance or rejection of each and every application will 
be determined by the Director of Admissions, subject to the right of 
appeal as provided in the by-laws of the Board of Regents of the 
University System. 

8. APPLICATION FORM DEPOSIT: A validating deposit of 
$15.00 must accompany each completed application form before it 
can be given official consideration. This deposit does not bind Arm- 
strong College to admit the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance 
of the applicant's qualifications. If the applicant is admitted, the 
deposit will be applied towards tuition for the quarter following 
acceptance. The deposit will be refunded to the applicant if he is not 
eligible for admission. If the applicant wishes to withdraw his appli- 
cation, the deposit will be refunded if the applicant does not registei 
and if the refund is requested in writing twenty (20) days prior to the 
first day of registration. 

9. The amount of academic credit that Armstrong College will 
allow for work done in another institution within a given period of 
time may not exceed the normal amount of credit that could have 
been earned at Armstrong College during that time. A maximum of 



22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



sixty 60 academic quartei hours from an accredited college may 
be applied in the program for which the applicant desires to enroll 

10. Courses transferred for credit from other colleges or univer- 
sities must have an over-all average of "C" grade. Under no cir- 
cumstances will credit be allowed for courses in freshman English 
unless the grades received are "C" or better. College credit will not 
be allowed for such courses as remedial English and remedial mathe- 
matics or courses basically of secondary school level. 

11. Credit for specific courses designated as "core curriculum" 
or "major"' courses will not be allowed unless grades received arc "( 
or above. 

12. It is the policy of the Board of Regents that the total numbei 
of hours that may be earned toward an associate degree by extension 
courses shall not exceed 22 / 2 quarter hours. 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are noi 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Develop- 
ment tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do col- 
lege work. A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA Form 
VB 7-1993) is required of every veteran who attends this institution 
under Public Law 550 (Korean Bill), application for which may be 
completed at the Veterans Administration office at 300 Drayton 
Street. Savannah, Georgia, or at the State Department of Veterans 
Service, 10 East Bay Street, Savannah. Georgia. Immediately upon 
receipt of Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement from the Veterans 
Administration the student should contact the Armstrong College 
Veterans Office regarding processing of certificate and future monthly 
reports. All veterans attending Armstrong College under Public Law 
550 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration 

Orientation and Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service oi Armstrong College ol 

Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the student's 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when 
the difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the adviser is usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning oi work in college, study habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems 
which do not fit into these general categories, cither because of 
greatei intensity or critical developments, are referable to community 
agencies outside the college if this is agreeable to the student and 
his parents or guardians. 



GENERAL [NFORMATH >.\ 

[Tie academic advisement oi students is distributed among th< 
entire faculty so that each instructor carries the responsibility for a 
proportionate number of the entire student body registered in tin- d.i\ 
program. Advisement interviews are scheduled with each student 
at least once a quarter and appointments for these interviews an 
mailed from the office of the Registrar. These interviews are designed 
to aid the student in planning his program ol work in college. 

Student Personnel Services 

In the fall of 1957 the office of Student Personnel Services w it- 
added to the advisement program discussed above. The services avail- 
able are as follows: individual diagnostic tests for students of high 
ability and low performance: vocational aptitude tests on an individual 
basis; and short-time counseling with students whose difficulties in 
adjusting to college life, either academic or social, require help be- 
yond that which may be given by advisors and instructors. 

Student Personnel Services also attempts to help the student to 
chose a senior college and to plan his program according to require- 
ments of the senior college. Information concerning scholarships 
may be obtained through this office. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this time 
an associate degree is awarded to those students who have met the 
requirements for graduation, and recognition is given to those who 
qualify for scholastic honors. The faculty and graduates participate 
in full academic dress. 

FEES 

Application Deposit 

The Application Deposit of $15.00 is made by all students at 
the time of initial application for admission to Armstrong College. 
This fee is applied as a credit against registration fees, if registration 
is completed the quarter following acceptance; otherwise, not refund- 
able. The acceptance of the Application Deposit does not constitute 
acceptance of student. If applicant wishes to withdraw application 
for admission, complete refund will be made provided written request 
is received twenty days prior to official registration date of the quar- 
ter following acceptance. The Application Deposit will be refunded 
to the applicant if he is not eligible for admission. Any student who 
withdraws during the first quarter of his attendance shall have his 
admission deposit deducted before any computation is made of the 
refund to which he mav be entitled. 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal 
course load of fifteen hours is $33.00. Special students (those carrying 
less than 12 credit hours in a quarter) will pay at the rate of $3.00 per 
quarter hour in Matriculation Fee. 

Out of State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $50.00 per quartei 
in addition to all regular fees. Special students (those carrying less 
than 12 credit hours in a quarter) who are not legal residents of 
the State of Georgia will pay at the rate of $4.00 per quarter houi 
Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 

Student Activity Fee 

There will be a student Activity Fee of $10.00 per quarter. 
This fee is not refundable. Student Activity Fee will be charged to 
any Day Student who has registered for ten or more quarter hours. 
No charge will be made to Evening Program Students. 

Late Registration Fee 

Five days will be allowed for completion of registration. A late 
registration fee of $3.00 will be charged on the fourth day of regis- 
tration and a late registration fee of $4.00 will be charged on the 
fifth day of registration. This fee is not refundable. 

Change of Schedule Fee 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
after the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made 
if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 

Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 

work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 

Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
pay a special fee. The fees are indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 



GENERAL INFORMATH )N 
Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, .1 student may arrange with an instructoi to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to 

make up the announced test must be made within one week alter the 

student returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 Is charged foi the making up oi any announced 

quiz and a lee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 

one student lor a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follows: The student was 
absent ( 1 ) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because 
of death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying tin 
lee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 

Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter $ 33.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 10.00 

TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS $ 43.00 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter 50.00 

TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS $ 93.00 

Matriculation, Special Students, per quarter hour 3.00 
Non-Resident Tuition, Special Students, per quarter 

hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) 4.00 

Application Deposit (paid only once, applied against fees) 15.00 

Privilege Fees 

Late Registration — Maximum 4.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation 7.50 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 

Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80 r r of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 



26 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



ing the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60 r r of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40' ( of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formalh 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20 r r of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part of the fees paid for that quarter. 

Students who formally withdraw from the Summer Session ait 
entitled to refunds as follows: 

Withdrawal on 1st. 2nd or 

3rd day of first week 8CK ( refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of first week 60*7 refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd or 

3rd day of second week 40 r r refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of second week 2CKr refund of fees paid 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change 
at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Library 

The college library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson 
Hall on the corner of Whitaker and West Gaston Streets. All the 
materials are readily available to the students since all books are on 
open shelves. On the main floor is the reference room which contains 
reference books, non-fiction books, biography, and the reserve and 
circulation desk. Downstairs is another reading room, containing fic- 
tion, books in foreign languages, current and bound volumes of 
periodicals, and the career information. The workroom and the office 
of the Librarian are also downstairs. 

At the present time the library collection consists of 15.000 vol- 
umes as well as a large number of pamphlets on subjects of current 
interest. More than one hundred periodicals are received, including 
four newspapers. Besides the books, magazines and pamphlets, the 
library has a collection of recordings located in the downstairs reading 
room tor the use of the student^, faculty and staff. 



GENERAL INFORMA IK >N 27 



In addition to the resources of the college library, the student* 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, also 

housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains an outstanding collec- 
tion of materials on Georgia and its history as well as a large collection 

of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the Historical So- 
ciety consist of more than ten thousand hooks, eighty periodical sub- 
scriptions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of the more 

complete tiles of the Savannah newspapers, dating hack to 1763. 



Audio Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, for- 
eign languages and music, visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is in- 
terested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application forms may be secured in the President's office in the Arm- 
strong Building. Those who wish to apply for a scholarship for the 
school year beginning in September should file an application in the 
President's office not later than July 15. All applicants are required 
to appear before an oral interview board during the month of August. 
Each applicant is notified in writing when to appear for his interview. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF WOMEN ACCOUNTANTS — 1 
is offered each year. Value: $100.00. (Women only are eligible.) This 
scholarship is awarded to a woman student from one of the local high 
schools who is planning to major in accounting. 

ARTHUR LUCAS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS— 5 are of- 
fered each year. Value: $100.00 each. (Both men and women are 
eligible.) 

JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE— 2 are offered each 
year. Value: $200.00 each. (Both men and women are eligible.) One 
scholarship is awarded to a sophomore and one to a freshman. 

EDWARD McGUIRE GORDON MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— 1 is offered each year. Value: $200.00. (Men only are eligible. | 
Applicants must be residents of Chatham Countv. 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY— 3 are offered each year. Value: 
$150.00 each. (Both men and women are eligible.) These scholarships 
are awarded to students in the dav school onlv. 



28 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION OF SAVANNAH— 1 is of- 
fered each yeai to a woman student. Value: $100.00. 

HARRY G. STRACHAN. Ill MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP 
1 is offered for the school year 1960-61. Value: $100.00. Both men 
and women are eligible. ) 

T. MAYHEW CUNNINGHAM MEMORIAL SCHOLAR 
SHIP— 1 is offered for the school year 1960-61. Value: $200.00. Both 

men and women are eligible.) 

Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with Student Personnel Services. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recrea- 
tional facilities and houses the book store. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 

The governing body for student affairs at Armstrong College i^ 
the Student Senate. This organization is made up of elected representa- 
tives from all student groups recognized by the Senate. It is the function 
and responsibility of the Senate to coordinate, direct and control stu- 
dent organizations and activities at Armstrong. 

Athletics 

Armstrong participates on the inter-collegiate level in basketball, 
golf, and tennis. All other sports at the college are on an intramural 
basis. Intramural competition is offered in such sports as basketball. 
volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, golf, softball and ping-pono. All 
are encouraged to take part in this program. 

Physical Education Program 

All regular day students are required to participate in a physical 
education program.* Courses are offered each quarter except during 

*This regulation is not applicable to students enrolled in the evening program. 



GENERAL INFORMA IK )N 29 



the summer. These are listed elsewhere in the catalog undei "Course 
Descriptions.*' See "General Regulations" foi specific information con 
cerning requirements of the program. 

Publications 

There are two student publications at Armstrong, the Inkwell, a 

newspaper, and the 'Geei //< v, the college annual. These afford the stu- 
dents an opportunity to express themselves through creative writing 
and art work, and to gain experience in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950, after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was re- 
organized as the Little Theatre. Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students and faculty interested 
in any phase of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up, cos- 
tuming, and other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio Workshop, 
formed to offer interested students an opportunity to develop tech- 
niques of radio broadcasting. 

The Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who enjoy 
singing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from group singing. 
Besides two yearly concerts at the college, the Glee Club has produced 
musicals with the Armstrong Masquers and sung for many civic 
groups in Savannah. 

Armstrong Evening Program 

Armstrong College Evening Program began operation in June 
1951. Fully accredited college classes are offered after 5:30 p.m.. Mon- 
day through Friday. Classes meet one. two or three evenings a week 
according to the amount of credit the course offers and its duration. 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non- 
credit basis. 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed elsewhere in 
this Bulletin are applicable. When a student is enrolled in more than 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



one course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. Refunds 
are made only in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc., is covered under 'Tees.'' Student acti\ it\ 
fees are not assessed evening program students unless they wish to par- 
ticipate in the regular activity program of the college. 

Qualified Armed Service personnel, currently on active duty, may 
have their tuition partially defrayed by the services. This is arranged 
through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of evening program courses, instructors, 
etc., may be obtained by addressing requests to the Director, Armstrong 
College Evening Program, P. O. Box 1913, Savannah. Georgia. 

Students employed during the day are advised to limit their enroll- 
ment to one or two courses. A student planning to graduate should 
follow one of the programs of study listed elsewhere in this Bulletin 
under "Curriculums." The Director of the Evening Program and mem- 
bers of the staff are available to assist students in planning their pro- 
grams. 

The Technical Institute Programs 

Six programs leading to the degree of Associate in Science are 
offered by the Armstrong Evening Program. These are two year ter- 
minal programs which qualify the student as a technician in his chosen 
field. Curriculums are available in the following technologies: Build- 
ing Construction, Civil and Electronic. In addition three other pro- 
grams are offered in cooperation with the Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corporation in Chemical, Industrial and Mechanical technologies. In 
these three fields the basic courses are taught at Armstrong College by 
the college staff. The advanced technical courses are conducted at the 
plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation by fully qualified 
company personnel. Excellent shop, laboratory and classroom facili- 
ties are available. These courses are fully accredited by Armstrong 
College and are not restricted to employees of the company. 

Tuition for Technical Institute courses taught at Armstrong Col- 
lege is the same as for other evening program courses. Tuition for the 
courses conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper plant is SI. 00 per 
credit hour, payable to Armstrong College. 

Classes are scheduled whenever possible with duplicate or extra 
sessions to accommodate shift workers with rotating work hours. 

Programs of study and course descriptions in the Technical Insti- 
tute program will be found elsewhere in this bulletin. 



( rENERAL INFORMA I h >N '.1 



Senior College Courses 

A limited numbei of uppei division courses are offered through 
the Extension Division of the University of Georgia. Instructors in these 
courses are approved by the heads of the departments at the University 
of Georgia. The courses carry University of Georgia credit and the 
grades are recorded in the Registrar's Office at the University of 
( Jeoi gia. 

Fees for Extension courses are $6.00 per quarter hour. A registra- 
tion fee of Sl. 00 is also charged. Registration for Extension courses is 
handled by representatives of the Extension Division entirely separate 
from Armstrong registration. 



General Regulations 

Advisement and Placement Tests 

To help a student select a definite objective early in his college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman 
a series of interest and achievement tests. Achievement tests in English 
and Mathematics are administered prior to admission. Placement in 
English and Mathematics courses is determined on the basis of the 
student's high school record and the scores on these tests. Interest tests 
are administered during Freshman Week. On the basis of these objec- 
tive measurements, the student's previous record, and his interest, the 
student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of study which 
will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examinations 

Each day student must submit a completed physical examination 
report on the forms furnished by the college before he can complete 
his registration. On the basis of the examination, the physical educa- 
tion director will adapt a program of training and recreation to indi- 
vidual requirements. This regulation is not applicable to students en- 
rolled in the Evening Program. 

Physical Education Program 

All day students who are carrying as many as 10 quarter hours 
and (or) are candidates for diplomas or certificates are required to 
attain credit for six physical education courses, one each quarter. A 
student graduating in less than six quarters may reduce the physical 
education requirements accordingly. Regular courses should be taken 
in proper sequence and two required courses should not be scheduled 
in any one quarter. 

A student who has served a minimum of three months in the mili- 
tary services shall be exempt from Physical Education 11. A student 
who has served a minimum of six months in the military services shall 
be exempt from Physical Education 11 and 12. Proof of service time 
shall be presented. 

In order for a day student to be excused from any one physical 
education course, he must have his or her doctor sign a special form. 
A student who does not plan to graduate from Armstrong College will 
be allowed to register for any one quarter without physical education 
providing he or she signs the proper form. No student may register 
without a required physical education course except with written per- 
mission from the Physical Education Department. 

The physical education department requires all students to make 
up all excused absences. Any unexcused absence from class will result 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



in a lower final grade. Physical education is not required <>l students m 
the evening program. 

Course Load 

liu unit of work for a regular student is Hi- 1 7 quarter hours pei 
quarter. A schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that the aver- 
age student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per week to his 
college elasses and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
tet hours will he granted only to students who have a "B" average foi 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

No student will be allowed to take more than 1 1 quarter hours of 
work in the Evening Program during the fall, winter and spring quar- 
ters unless he has better than a "B" average in the last quarter for 
which grades are available. A student will be limited to 6 quarter hours 
during any one term of the summer unless he has better than a "B" 
average in the last quarter of work for which grades are available. The 
limitations in the two preceding sentences apply only to students who 
are full-time employed. All entering students and students with full- 
time employment are limited to 1 1 quarter hours of work in the fall, 
winter and spring quarters; and to 6 quarter hours of work during any 
one term of the summer session. This regulation does not apply to 
transient students who are regularly enrolled in another institution. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Regents of 
University System of Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the 
use on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by the administration and faculty that students in college 
should be held accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, report 
cards, warnings of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not 
sent to parents or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead 



\A ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



A plus 

A 

B 

c: 

D 

E 


95-100 
90- 94 
80- 89 
70- 79 
60- 69 


Exceptional 

Excellent 

Good 

Fair 

Poor 

Incomplete 


F 

W 

W/F 




Failure 
Withdrew 
Withdrew Failing 



the students themselves receive these reports and are expected to con- 
tact their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards 
are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades art- 
issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an 
adviser: in addition, the Registrar and all instructors are available to 
help any student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter houi 
1) honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 
Incomplete must be removed before 
mid term of the following quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the middle of the 
succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F".* 

Any student in the Evening Program who is unable to remove a 
grade of ''E" because of absence due to military service or conditions 
of employment, may appeal to the Academic Standing Committee for 
a waiver of this regulation. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quai- 
ters taking a normal load I not less than fifteen hours per quarter . 
and achieving an average grade of **B" or better with no grade below 
that of "C" will be placed on the Permanent Dean's list. This list is 
published each June in the commencement program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points per 
quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude with 
highest distinction). The designation cum laude with distinction will 
be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements with an aver- 
age of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be selected by the graduating cla>v from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a grade of "B" or better 
in each course during any quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scho- 
lastic Attainment List. 



* A grade of "E" received in the Spring Quarter must hv made up by mid-term 
of the following Fall Quarter. 



GENERAL REGULA I K >NS 



Students in the Evening Program enrolled foi ten 01 more hours, 
who earn 15 consecutive quartei hours oi credit with grades ol "B" 01 
better in each course will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attain- 
ment List. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A day student who has been absent from class for a valid reason 

should have the absence excused with a written statement to his in- 
structor who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the 
Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from 
the date the student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not 
be excused. Evening Program students must Leave excuses for absence 
in the Evening Program office 1 on a special form provided for that 
purpose. 

Any student whose absences for any cause exceed one third of the 
number of times the class meets in the quarter will be dropped from 
the class. The student will be given a W '\V" if at the time he was 
dropped he had a passing grade; if at the time he was dropped Ik- was 
failing, he will be given a "WF". 

The above regulation is waived only in those cases approved by 
the academic standing committee. 

Any student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
times the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused 
absence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the 
Registrar's office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's 
office will notify the student. Grades assigned to those who have been 
dropped will be either W or W/F. A student who is dropped within 
three weeks after the beginning of the quarter will automatically re- 
ceive a grade of W. A student who is dropped after the 3rd week of the 
quarter will receive either a W or a W/F depending upon his status at 
time the student withdraws or is dropped from class. 

Students will be charged with absences incurred by late registra- 
tion in the college as indicated in the current bulletin and these ab- 
sences carry the same penalty as the other absences from a course. 

Attendance at monthly assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such intentions known to the administration of the college in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



A student should formally withdraw from any class which he dis- 
continues by securing the written approval of the instructor and his 
faculty adviser. This written approval should be filed in the Registrar's 
office. Grades assigned to those who withdraw will be either W 01 
W/F. A student who withdraws within three weeks after the beginning 
of the quarter will automatically receive a grade of W. A student who 
withdraws after the Sid week of the quarter will receive a W or W/F 
depending upon his status at the time the student withdraws or is 
dropped from class. 

Dismissal 

Any day student failing (except in cases excused before examina- 
tions on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than 
physical education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls 
of the college. Any student who fails to make an average of at least 0.6 
honor points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the first 
three quarters work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. 
Withdrawal is recommended to all students who have less than a "C" 
average at the end of the fourth quarter. At the end of the sixth quar- 
ter's work a student must have an 0.8 honor point per quarter hour 
average in order to re-register. 

Any student in the evening program seeking credit who fails (ex- 
cept when excused before final examination on account of illness) to 
pass at least one course with a recorded grade of "D" or better in two 
consecutive quarters will be dropped from the rolls of the college. Any 
student in the evening program who fails to make an average of at 
least 0.6 honor points per quarter hour in the first 50 quarter hours of 
work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. Withdrawal is 
recommended to all students who have less than a "C" average at the 
end of 70 quarter hours of work. At the end of 90 quarter hours of 
work, a student must have an average of 0.8 honor points per quarter 
hour in order to re-register. 

Students who have been asked to withdraw on account of academic 
deficiency will be re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes to 
another college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If a 
student does not go to another college he may re-register at Armstrong 
College after two quarters.* He re-enters on probation for one quarter, 
during which quarter he must make a "C" average. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed elsewhere 
in the catalog under "Curricula" with an average grade of 

•The Summer Session counts as a quarter. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 37 



'*( ' Any exceptions to a program may be referred by a stu- 
dent's adviser to the Committee on Academic Standing. 

2. One-third of tin- work required for graduation will be com* 
pleted at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. Examination on the Constitutions. Examinations on the Con- 
stitution of the United States and that of the State of Georgia, 
required of all persons' receiving a degree from the Collegi 

unless exempted by credit in Political Science IS. will he given 
at times to he announced. 

Examination on United States and Georgia History. Examina- 
tions on the history of the United States and of Georgia are 
required of all persons receiving a degree from the College 
unless exempted by credit in History 100. The examinations 
will be given at times to be announced. 

4. When exceptions to prerequisites for courses are made, permis- 
sion may be granted only by the head of the department con- 
cerned. A recommendation regarding any request for exception 
to prerequisites for courses must be made to the department 
head by the course instructor. This need not be binding upon 
the department head. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Regis- 
trar's office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the grades 
the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions ex- 
pressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, the Cavil Service, the local Credit Bureau and other 
agencies having access to confidential records. A good college record is 
of vital importance to a student. 

Students Assigned to English 101R 

Students who, upon initial admission, are assigned to English 101R 
and Psychology 100T will be required to pass both of these courses 
with a grade of C before registering for further work at Armstrong. 
These students may take only these two courses and physical education 
during their first quarter. Students who fail to make C in these courses 
may repeat them once. If a student fails to make a C in one of them, 
he may repeat that course, but may not take any other work until he 
has passed both with a C. 

Exceptions to this rule may be made for students in the Evening 
program by the Director in some special cases. 



Curricula 



General 

Before registration, the student should PLAN A PROGRAM OF 
STUDY WITH AN ADVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 
are required for graduation, he should have on record in the office of 
his adviser a copy of his program. In order for a student to make any 
changes in his planned program he must consult his adviser. The ad- 
viser and the Registrar will check a student's program and it will be 
approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

An associate degree is conferred upon all students who successfully 
complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the two-year pro- 
grams. 

II a student plans to transfer to another institution either before or 
after graduation, it is essential that he determine what courses must be 
completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree require- 
ment of the institution to which he wishes to transfei . 

The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indis- 
pensable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding 
of one's environment and man's struggle to adapt is to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings, right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 101. 102. History 114. 115: ten quarter 
hours of natural sciences."* and Physical Education 111. 112. 113. 
With permission of instructor, students may substitute Physical Edu- 
cation 114 for Physical Education 112 and Physical Education 203 foi 
Physical Education 113. 

Students enrolled in one year programs may choose any three of 
the required physical education* courses as listed for freshmen and 
sophomores. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of phys- 
ical education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses described 
below may substitute English 228 for one of the required English 
courses. 

A student may choose any three of the following physical educa- 
tion courses: 201. 203. 205. 206. 207. 208. 232. 



•Physical Education is not required of Evening Program students. 
••Natural sciences include biology, chemistry, physics, human biology, and 
physical science. 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 






students graduating in less than tin- six quarters oi the regulai 
session may reduce theii physical education requirements accordingly 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and t\\<' 
courses should not In- scheduled in any one quarter. 

SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
PROGRAMS 



(1) Business Administration* 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman English 201, 202— Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 114, 115 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Business Administration 101. 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 102— Accounting 10 

Laboratory Science 10 Economics 101, 102 

Mathematics 101 — College Principles and Problems 10 

Aim bra 5 Political Science 113— Gov't of 

Mathematics 103 — Finance 5 U. S. 5 

Electives 5 Electives 10 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

(2) Engineering 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types <>1 
engineering. The student should obtain a catalog from the senior col- 
lege he plans to attend and check this program against the require- 
ments. The courses required for the freshman year have been worked 
out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102— Freshman English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 **Historv 114. 115— Western 

Chemistry 101, 102— General 10 Civilization 10 

Mathematics 101. 102, 104— Physical Education 3 

College Algebra. Trigonom- Mathematics 201. 202, 203 — 

etry and Analytic Geometrv Calculus 1 5 

and Calculus 15 Physics 207. 208. 209 18 

Chemistry 103 — Qualitative ** Political Science 113 5 

Analysis . 5 

Engineering 101. 102 — Drawing 4 TOTAL 61 

Engineering 109— Descriptive 

Geometry 2 

TOTAL 49 

*A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for re- 
quired subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this course. 
**3 quarters of a foreign language may be taken in lieu of the social sciences. 



40 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



(3) Forestry 

A one-yeai program foi students in Forestry. The student should 
obtain a catalog from the senior college he plans to attend and check 
this program against the requirements. 

English 101, 102— Freshman 10 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 

Biology 111. 11 2— Botany 1 

Economics 101 — Principles 5 

Engineering 101 — Drawing 1 

Mathematics 101. 102 — College Algebra and Trigonometry 10 

Physics 204 or Physical Science 101 5 

Political Science 113 — Gov't of U. S. 5 

TOTAL 50 

(4) Home Economics 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman • English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English ...... 10 English 10 

History 114. 115 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 Home Economics 112 — Family 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Meal Planning and Serving 5 

\it 101— Creative Art 5 . Home Economics 201 — Home 

Home Economics 110 — Planning and Decorating 5 

Orientation 5 Home Economics 204 — 

Home Economics 111 — Clothing 5 Family Fundamentals 5 

Laboratory Science 10 Social Studies 10 

Electives 5 

TOTAL 48 Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

TOTAL 48 

(5) Industrial Management 

This program will satisfy decree requirements for the first two 
years of this field of engineering. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 114 — Western Physical Education 

Civilization 5 Historv 115- — Western 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Civilization 5 

Chemistry 101. 102 — General 10 Business Administration 101. 

Chemistry 103 — Qualitative 102 — Principles of Accounting 10 

Analysis 5 Economics 101. 102 — 

Engineering 101. 102 — Drawing 1 Principles and Problems 10 

Engineering 109 — Descriptive Mathematics 103 — Mathe- 

Geometrv 2 matics of Finance 5 

Mathematics 101. 102. 104— Physics 204. 205. 206- 

College Algebra, Trigonom- General Physics 15 

etry and Analytic Geometry r*ww, 7^ 

and Calculus ' 15 TOTAL .i8 

I < >TAL 54 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



I! 



((>) Liberal Arts 

This program is recommended for candidates foi the A. IV degree, 
pre-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, and other pre 

professional concentrations. 



First Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman 

English 
History 114. 115 -Western 

Civilization 
Physical Education 111. 112. US 
Laboratory Science 
Mathematics 101 — College 

Algebra 
Mathematics 102 — 

Trigonometry 
* Foreign Language 



TOTAL 



Second Year 

English 2()1. 2<)2 Sophomore 

10 English 10 

Physical Education 3 

10 *Science 10 

3 Two of the following courses — 
10 History 225 — Recent European 

Political Science 113 — Gov't 
5 of U. S. 10 

Psychology 201 — Introductory 
5 Sociology 201 — Introductory 
10 Economics 101 — Principles 

Philosophy 110 — Introductory 
53 Electives ' 10 



TOTAL 



43 



( 7 ) Mathematics 

A program designed for those students who wish to major in 
mathematics. 



First Year 

English 101. 102 — Freshman 
English 

History 114. 115 — Western 
Civilization 


10 

10 

3 

10 

5 

5 

5 


Second Year 

English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 

Physical Education 
Physics 204. 205. 206. 207. 

208, 209 
Electives 

TOTAL 


10 
3 


Physical Education 111, 112. 113 
Chemistry or Biology 
Mathematics 101 — College 
Algebra 


10 
25 

48 


Mathematics 102 — 
Trigonometry 

Mathematics 104 — Analytic- 
Geometry and Calculus 





TOTAL 



48 



(8) Medical Technology 

This program is designed for those students who wish to obtain 
their first two years toward a Bachelor of Science degree in Medical 



*A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require the 
amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of his adviser, substi- 
tute other courses required by the senior institution during the first two years. 






ARMSTRONG ( OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Technology. An Associate in Arts degree Is awarded upon successful 
completion oi the academic program described below. 



First Year 



English 101. 102- Freshman 
English 

Biology 114. 1 15 — General 
Zoology 

Mathematics 101. 102 — Algebra 

and Trigononit ti\ 
Chemistry 101. 102. 103 — 

General Chemistry 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 

TOTAL 



Second Year 





English 201. 202- Sophomore 




10 


English 
Biology 230 — Comparative 


10 


10 


Anatomy 
History 114. 115- Western 


6 


10 


Civilization 


10 




French or German 101-102 


10 


15 


Electives 


10 


3 


Phvsical Education 


3 



18 



1 ( )TAL 



49 



(38) Music 

English 101. 102— Freshman English 

History 114. 115 — Western Civilization 

Physical Education 

Applied Music 

Music Theory 110. 111. 112 

Electives 

TOTAL 



10 

10 
3 
6 
9 

10 

18 



(9) Physical Education 
First Year 



Second Year 



English 101. 102— Freshman 
English 


10 

10 

3 

10 


English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 
Physical Education 
Biology 118. 119— Anatomy 

and Phvsioloyv 
***Physical Education 203— 

Senior Life Saving and 


10 


History 114. 115— Western 

Civilization 
Physical Education 111. 112. 113 
Biology 114. 115 


3 

10 


Home Economics 232 — 






Nutrition 
Mathematics 9 or 101 
**Electives 

TOTAL 




5 
5 
5 

48 


Swimming 
Physical Education 114 — 

Officiating of Basketball 
Psychology 201 — Introductorv 
Psychology 202T— 

Experimental 
Sociology 202— Mairiane 

and Family 
**Electives 


■> 

5 

5 

5 
6 



TOTAL 



48 



**It is recommended that English 228 be taken as an elective course. 

***The student is exempt from this course provided he has a Red Cross "Senior 
Life Saving Certificate." 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY I'ldiCKWh 



(10) Physics 

A program designed foi those students \\ln> wish to majoi in 

PhvsicS. 



First Year 

English KM. [02 Freshman 

English 
History 114. 115 Western 

Civilization 
Physical Education 111. 112, 113 
Chemistry or Biology 
Mathematics 101- College 

Aim In. i 
Mathematics 1 02- — Trigonomcti \ 
Mathematics 104 — Analytic 

( reometry and Calculus 



Second Year 





English 201. 202 Soph 


>morc 




10 


English 




H» 




Physical Education 






10 


Mathematics 201. 202. 


203 




3 


Calculus 




1") 


10 


Physics 207. 208. 209 




18 


5 
5 


*Elcctives 




10 


TOTAL 




"• 



TOTAL 



18 



(11) Pre-Dental 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon 
successful completion of the academic program described below. 



First Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman 

English 
Biology 114. 115— General 

Zoology 
Mathematics 101. 102— Algebra 

and Trigonometry 
Chemistry 101. 102.' 103 — 

General Chemistry 
Physical Education 111. 112. 113 



Second Year 





English 201. 202— Sophomore 




10 


English 
History 114. 115 — Western 


10 


10 


Civilization 
Biology 230 — Comparative 


10 


10 


Anatomy .... 


6 




French or German 101. 102 


10 


15 


Electives 


10 


3 


Physical Education 


3 



TOTAL 



!H 



TOTAL 



[9 



(12) Pre-Medical 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of medicine after completing three or more 



*Electives should include a foreign language, preferably German. 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon 
completion of the academic program described below. 

First Year Second Year 



English 101. 102 — Freshman 




English 201. 202 — Sophomore 




English 


10 


English 


10 


Biology 114. 115 — General 




Biolo^v 230 — Comparative 




Zoology 


10 


Anatomy 


6 


Chentfstry 101. 102. 103 — 




French or German 101. 102 


10 


General Chemistrv 


15 


Historv 114. 115 — Westt-rn 




Mathematics 101. 102 — Algebra 




Civilization 


10 


and Trigonometry 


10 


Electives 


10 


Physical Education 111. 112. 113 


3 


Physical Education 


3 



TOTAL 48 TOTAL 49 

(13) Pre-Nursing 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offering a B.S. in Nursing. 

First Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman 

English 10 

History 114. 115 — Western 

Civilization 10 

Chemistry 101 — General 

Chemistry 5 

Sociology 201 — Introductory 

Sociology 5 

Psychology 201 — Introductory 

Psychology 5 

Psychology 5 

Physics 204— General Physics 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 

TOTAL 48 

In addition to the above requirements, the School of Nursing, 
Medical College of Georgia, requires that the student satisfy the Stan 
requirements covering the Constitution of the United States and the 
History of the United States and Georgia by completing an examina- 
tion in each of these two areas or by taking Political Science \\j and 
History 100. In addition it should be pointed out that the prerequisites 
for taking Physics 204 are Mathematics 101 and 102 College Algebra 
and Trigonometry). It should be obvious at this point that in order to 
complete all of these requirements, the student should begin this pro- 
gram in the summer preceding the anticipated Fall enrollment. 

( 14) Pre-Optometry 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optometry in the United States are relatively uniform but are not iden- 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAMS 



n 



deal, rhe practice oi optometry in all states is regulated 1>\ Boards oi 
Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare a 
student for transfei to .m\ school or college of optometry in the United 
states and ( Sanada. 

First Year Second Year 

English KM, 102 Freshman English 201. 202 Sophomore 

English Lfl English 10 

Historv 111. 115 Western Bioloiiy 230 Comparative 

Civilization 10 Anatonrj 6 

Biology 114. 115 — General Mathematics 102. 10 1 

Zoology 10 Trigonometry, Analytic 

Chemistry 101. 102 — General Geometry and Caleulus 10 

Chemistry 10 Sociology 201 — Introductory 5 

Mathematics 101 — College Psychology 201 — Introductory 5 

Algebra 5 Electives ' 10 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL ! ( ' 

(15) Pre-Pharmacy 

This is a two-year concentration for those students who wish to 
obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmacy require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Pharmacy after completing two years of 
academic stuides. Beginning in 1960 all students of Pharmacy arc 
required to complete a five-year program, two of which are in Pre- 
Pharmacy and three in an accredited School of Pharmacy. An Asso- 
ciate in Arts degree is awarded upon completion of the academic pro- 
gram described below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 114. 115 — Western Economics 101— Economic 

Ci\ilization 10 Principles 5 

Mathematics 101, 102 — Algebra Political Science 113 — 

and Trigonometry 10 Goyernment of U. S. 5 

Chemistry 101, 102 ; 103— Physics 204— General Physics 5 

General Chemistry 15 Biology 111. 114. 115 — Botany 

Physical Education fll. 112. 113 3 and'Zoology 15 

Electiyes 10 

TOTAL 48 Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 53 

(16) Pre- Veterinary 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a senior institution. 



lb 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Some colleges and universities require a veterinary student to begin 
specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well-rounded foun- 
dation for the study ol veterinary medicine, it is recommended that he 
pursue the two year pre-medical program. 

English 101, 102 — Freshman English 

History 114. 115 — Western Civilization 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 

Biology 114, 115— General Zoology 

Chemistry 101. 102 — General Inorganic 

Mathematics 101. 102 — College Algebra and Trigonometry 



TOTAL 



10 

in 
3 

10 
10 
10 

53 



(17) Teaching 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years b) 
colleges preparing teachers are general in nature: English, history, 
mathematics, sciences, social studies and physical education, to mention 
some of these. The program below enables prospective teachers to be 
certified by the State Department of Education as having completed 
two years of college and entitles the student to the Associate in Arts 
Degree. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 Education 201 5 

History 114, 115 10 English 201. 202 10 

Biological Science 10 Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Physical Education 3 

Political Science 113 5 Psychology 201 5 

Art 101 or Music 120 5 *Electives 20 

*Electives 5 

TOTAL 48 

TOTAL 48 



e Students in this curriculum should secure the catalog of the senior college 
which they plan to attend and plan a program with an adviser. 
Recommended electives for elementary teachers include health, geography, eco- 
nomics. Georgia problems (Social Science 4), English 228 and additional 
science courses. 



rERMINAL PROGRAMS 






TERMINAL PROGRAMS 



(18) Business Administratis 



Accounting 



TWO-YEAR TERMINAL 
First Year Second Year 

Business Administration 2011 



Business Administration 101. 
102 Accounting 

English 101. 102 — Freshman 

English 
History 114. 115 Western 

Civilization 
Natural Science 
Physical Education 111. 112. 
Electives 

h )IAL 



113 



10 


202T Intermediate 






Accounting 


Id 


10 


English 201. 202 or English 






201. 228 


10 


10 


Economics 101, 102 — Principles 




10 


of Economics 


10 


3 


Business Administration 207T- 




5 


Business Law 


5 




Physical Education 


3 


48 


Electives 


10 



TOTAL 



48 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 

additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration 236T. 237T — Income Tax Accounting 10 

Business Administration 229T — Cost Accounting 5 

Business Administration 260X — Principles of Management 5 

Business Administration 208T — Business Law 5 
Electives chosen from Business Administration. Economics or 

Industrial Technology courses 20 



TOTAL 



45 



(20) Business Administration 

General 

TWO-YEAR TERMINAL 
First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman Economics 101. 102 — 

English 10 Principles of Economics 

History 114. 115— Western English 201. 202 or English 

Civilization 10 201, 228 

Business Administration 101, 102 — Business Administration 207 T 

Principles of Accounting 10 Business Law 

Natural Science 10 Electives 

Business Administration 260 — Physical Education 

Principles of Management 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 TOTAL 

TOTAL 48 



10 

10 

5 

20 

3 



48 



48 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll loi 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration 208T — Business Law ."> 

Business Administration 15 IT — Principles of Transportation 5 

Business Administration 161T — Principles of Insurance 5 

Business .Administration 162T — Real Estate Principles 5 

Business Administration 23 IT — Retailing 5 

Economics 125T — Elementary Economic Statistics 5 

Economics 126 — American Economic History 5 

Economics 127T — Money and Banking 5 

Economics 128T — Principles of Marketing 5 

Economics 129T — Labor Economics 5 

Economics 130T — Personnel Administration 5 

Economics 13 IT — Government and Business 5 

Economics 132T — Investments 5 

Students interested in the field of Industrial Management may 
substitute 15 hours in the Industrial Technology Curriculum from the 
following courses: 

IT 121 — Production Organization 3 

IT 122 — Economic Analysis 3 

IT 123— Production and Cost Control 3 

IT 124 — Time and Motion Study 3 

IT 127— Data Presentation ' 3 

IT 128— Personnel Motivation 3 

(21) Business Administration 

Transportation 

As a communications center, Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management. A com- 
mittee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck lines. 
in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the professional 
classes listed below. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102— Freshman English 201. 202— World 

English 10 Literature or English 228 — 

History 114. 115 — Western Public Speaking and Business 

Civilization 10 Administration 115 — Business 

Business Administration 15 IT — Correspondence 10 

Introduction to Transportation 5 Natural Science 10 

Business Administration 152T — Business Administration 154T— 

Elementary Rates & Tariffs 5 Advanced Rates & Tariffs 5 

Business Administration 153T— Business Administration 155T— 

Intermediate Rates & Tariffs 5 Interstate Commerce Law 5 

Economics 101, 102 — Principles Business Administration 1 56T — 

and Problems 10 Interstate Commerce Commission 

and Public Service Commission 
TOTAL 45 Procedure 5 

Business Administration 101. 102 — 
Elementary Accounting 10 

TOTAL 45 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 1" 

Students desiring further training in this general field may select 

five other subjects listed under the Business Administration, General, 
(curriculum number 20). A certificate will be awarded upon comple- 
tion of 45 hours additional work. 

(22) Transportation 

Fifty-Hour Concentration in Transportation 

Students wishing a thorough background in transportation may 

receive a certificate upon satisfactory completion of the program that 

follows : 

BA 15 IT — Introduction to Transportation 5 
BA 152T— Elementary Rates and Tariffs 5 
BA 153T — Intermediate Rates and Tariffs 5 
BA 154T — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 5 
BA 155T — Interstate Commerce Law 5 
BA 156T — Interstate Commerce Commission and Public- 
Service Commission Procedure 5 
Economics 101 and 102 — Principles and Problems 10 
English 101 and 102 — Freshman English, or English 228 — Public 

Speaking, and BA 115 — Business Correspondence 10 

TOTAL 50 

(23) Business Administration 

One Year Program 

A one year program in Business Administration (with emphasis on 
business courses) for those persons who may not wish to complete the 
two-year concentration. A certificate will be awarded to those who 
successfully complete the program. 

Business Administration 101, 102 — Introductory Accounting 10 

Business Administration 201T — Intermediate Accounting .. 5 

Economics 101. 102 — Principles and Problems 10 

Business Administration 207T — Business Law 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 

(24) Commerce Secretarial 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business. If, due to prior 
training, a student is permitted by the instructor to omit the beginning 



-,ii ARMSTRONG COLl.KCiK OF SAVANNAH 



theory courses in shorthand or typing, the student must choose elective 
subjects to supplement the total college hours required. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 — Freshman Business Administration 101 — 



English 




10 


Accounting 


5 


History 114. 115 — Western 






•English 201, 202 


10 


Civilization 




10 


Commerce 213 — Office Practice 


5 


Physical Education 111. 112, 


113 


3 


Commerce 201, 202, 203— 




Natural Science 




10 


Typing 

Commerce 211. 212 — Shorthand 


6 


Commerce 101. 102. 103— 






6 


Typing 




6 


Physical Education 


3 


Commerce 111, 112. 113— 






Business Administration 1 1 5 — 




Shorthand 




9 


Business Correspond 


5 









Elective 


8 


T( )TAL 




48 








TOTAL 48 

(25) Commerce Stenographic 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the clerical skills which will enable her to secure employment 
as a stenographer or clerk. Whether or not a student will be placed in 
beginning theory classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon how 
much previous training she has had in those subjects; a more advanced 
standing must be approved by the instructor. A certificate is awarded 
upon completion of the following program. 

Commerce 101. 102. 103— Typing 6 

Commerce 111. 112. 1 13— Shorthand 9 

Commerce 213 — Office Practice ... 5 

Business Administration 101 — Accounting 5 

English 101. 102— Freshman 10 

Physical Education 111, 112. 113 3 

Business Administration 115 — Business Correspondence 5 

Elective 5 

T( )TAL 48 



(26) Home Economics 



This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who 
plan to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives 
are allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which 
have a vocational value' or cultural subjects lor worthy use o\ leisure 

time. 



♦Enulish 228 may be substituted for English 202. 






I ERMINAL PROGRAMS 



First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 Freshman 4 English 201, 202 Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 111. 115 Western Physical Education 

Civilization 1" Home Economics 201 Home 

Physical Education ; Planning and Decorating "> 

Natural Science 1" Home Economics 204 Family 

Home Economics 1 1" Fundamentals 

Orientation: Personal Home Economics 112 Famil) 

Development 5 Meal Planning and Serving 5 

Home Economics 1 1 1 Clothing 5 Electives _'" 

Psychology 201 Introductory 5 TOTAL 18 

TOTAL IB 

(27) Human Relations* 

The Terminal sequence in Human Relations is designed to start 

with the student's immediate interests in learning, methods of study and 
aptitude measurement. The next course, on principles and facts about 
the individual's growth, needs, feelings and learning about the world 
around him, is followed by a practical application through experiments 
or by interning in selected community programs where individual de- 
velopment and adjustment may be directly observed. This leads to a 
study of a person's relationship to his social groups, a study of marriage 
and family adjustments, principles and facts about the way that out 
society is organized and finally to a practical study, through local or- 
ganizations, of needs and resources for human adjustment in our com- 
munity. A student who completes this sequence should have a basic- 
understanding of himself and others that will improve his effective- 
ness in his family, his work (whether in the home or employed else- 
where), his social relationships and his responsible participation in 
community living. 

First Year Second Year 

Rnglish 101. 102— Freshman English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 114, 115— Western Biology 114. 115— General 

Civilization 10 Zoology or 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Biology 101. 102 — Human 
Mathematics 9 or 101 5 Biology 10 

Political Science 113 5 Physical Education 3 

Psychology 100T — Applied Sociology 202 — Marriage and 

Psychology 5 Family J 

Psychology 201 — Introductory Psychology 203 — Social 

Psychology 5 Psychology 5 

Psychology 202T — Experimental Sociology 201 — Introductory 

Psychology 5 Sociology 5 

TOTAL 48 Sociology 203T — Community and 

Social Problems 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL _ 18 

*Students in other concentrations may elect any Psychology or Sociology course 
in this program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites are 
necessary in Psychologv 202T. Psvchologv 203. and Psvchologv 205. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



52 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



(28) Liberal Arts 

A student in the Liberal Arts, Terminal program may select the 

remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 

to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102 — Freshman English 201. 202 — Sophomore 

English 10 English 10 

History 114. 115 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 10 **Electives 35 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 

Natural Science 10 TOTAL 48 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

**Electives 10 



TOTAL 48 

A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

History 225 5 

Philosophy 110 5 

Select 20 hours from the following 20 

French, German, Spanish, or Russian 

Two additional laboratory (double) or Mathematics Courses 

Electives 15 

TOTAL 45 

(40) Medical Office Assistant 

This two year curriculum leading to the degree of Associate in 
Arts is designed to develop a graduate who can meet the ever-increas- 
ing demand for efficient assistants trained not only in standard office 
operations but also in professional ethics and the routine technical pro- 
cedures that are commonly carried on in the physician's office. In addi- 
tion, the student will have a good background in the area of general 
education. 

The Medical Office Assistant must be prepared to act as recep- 
tionist, office nurse, secretary and laboratory assistant. She must be 
tactful, understanding and discreet, as well as meticulously accurate 
in laboratory work and the keeping of medical and financial records. 
Such an assistant would be in demand not only in physicians' offices 



*A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following depart- 
ments: Foreign Language. Political Science. Economics, Fine Arts. Horn? 
Economics. Philosophy. Psychology. Sociology. Mathematics (other than 
Mathematics 103). 



IKKMINAl. I'ROdRAMs 



53 



but in hospitals, clinics, public health agencies, and a numbei "I othei 

institutions in the areas ot health and welfare. 



First Year 



Commerce KM. 102. 103— 

Typing 6 

Commerce 111. 112. 113— 

Shorthand 9 

English 101. 102— Freshman 

English 10 

Biology 118. 119— Anatomy 

and Physiology 10 

History 114 — Western 

Civilization 5 

Business Administration 101 — 

Accounting 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 

TOTAL 48 



Second Year 

Biology 210, 220T— Microbiology 

and Clinical Laboratory 10 

Chemistry 101 — Inorganic 5 

English 201 — Sophomore English 5 
English 202 or 228 — Sophomore 

English or Public Speaking 5 

History 115 — Western 

Civilization 5 

Commerce 224 — Medical 

Terminology and Dictation 5 

Commerce 228 — Medical Office 

Practice 5 

Psychology 201 — Introductory 5 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 48 



(29) Medical Technology 



This is a two-year program for those students who wish to meet 
the requirements of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists and 
who will complete their training at some approved school of Medical 
Technology. An Associate in Arts degree is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below. 



First Year 

English 101, 102, 

Freshman English 10 

Biology 114. 115— General 

Zoology 10 

Mathematics 101 — College 

Algebra 5 

Chemistry 101. 102. 103 — 

General Chemistry 15 

**Electives 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

English 201. 202— Sophomore 

English 

Chemistry 280a. 280b— 

Quantitative 
Biology 230 — Comparative 

Anatomy 

Biology 210 — Microbiology 
History 114. 115 — Western 

Civilization 

**Electives 7 to 

Physical Education 

TOTAL 48 to 



10 



6 
5 

10 

10 

3 

51 



**Electives strongly recommended are Physics. Typing and Psychology. It 
should be noted that if Physics is desired, an additional course in mathe- 
matics should be taken, preferably during the Freshman year. 



VI ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENC I. 

BASIC SUBJECTS 

Required in all Technical Institute Programs 

( purse descriptions for Technical Institute Programs are listed 

elsewhere in this Bulletin. A student may register for any of the sub- 
jects in the program of his choice as soon as he has met the prerequi- 
sites. 

English 101 Freshman English 5 

GT 114 Technical Mathematics I (or Math 101) 5 

GT 115 Technical Mathematics II (or Math 102) 5 

Physics 204 Mechanics 5 

*Phvsics 205 Electricity 5 

Physics 206 Heat. Sound. Light 5 

Engineering 101 Engineering Drawing 2 

Psychology 100T Applied Psychology 5 

GT 113" Technical Report Writing 3 

GT 112 or Public Speaking 3 

English 228 or Fundamentals of Speech 5 

English 250 Public Speaking 5 



43 or 45 



(39) Building Construction Technology 

Huilding Construction Technology deals with the design, con- 
struction and construction supervision of homes, industrial plants, of- 
fices, schools and hospitals. The student is taught to design, draw plans 
and follow through with construction details and methods. 

Graduates in this program will be qualified for many positions, in- 
cluding engineering draftsman, general contractor, junior engineer, 
architectural draftsman and estimator, building inspector, and many 
others. 

Civ. T 1-1 Elementary Survevinu 6 

BCT 121 Graphics ........... 6 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212 Concrete Construction 5 

Civ. T 212 Structural Drafting I 2 

Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 2 

BCT 111 Building Design I 6 

BCT 223 Building Design II 6 

B< 1 224 Building Design III 6 

BCT 11- Construction Materials and Estimates 6 

BCT 243 Building Equipment 3 

BCT 231 Architectural History 3 



62 



•Not required for Electronics & Communication Technology. 



I I ( HNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 



(31) Chemical Technolog) 



The curriculum for Chemical Technology has been designed to 
meet the needs of the chemical, papei and other related heav) indus- 
tries for competent and well-trained technicians. The program gives 
the student a working knowledge of the fundamental branches of for- 
mal chemistry and chemical engineering. 

Industries are placing greater emphasis every year on instrumental 
methods of analysis which are far more rigid and precise than formal 
chemical methods. The student completing the curriculum in Chemical 
Technology will acquire training in the theory and use of these elec- 
tronic, optical and thermal instruments. 

Positions open to graduates are assistant to research personnel, 
control chemist, assistant to chemical engineers, analyst and pilot plant 
assistant, as well as many others. 

Chemistry 101 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 102 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 103 ... Qualitative Inorganic Analysis 5 

Engineering 102 Engineering Drawing 2 

Chemistry 280a Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 1 

Chemistry 280b Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 3 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety L J/ 2 

*Civ. T. 120 Elementary Industrial Statistics I 

*CT 121 Experimental Design 3 

Civ. T. 160 Material Balances 

Civ. T. 161 Energy Balances 3 

*CT 162 Elementary Chemical Processes 4 

*CT 165 Industrial Chemistry 4 



45' . 



In addition, the student will select one of the two options listed 
below, either paper and pulp or chemical. 

PULP AND PAPER OPTION 

*CT 140 Pulping 5 

*CT 141 Paper Machinery 5 

*CT 142 Paper Testing 3 

*CT 143 Pulp Testing 3 

*CT 164 Wood Structure and Properties \ 



CHEMICAL OPTION 



Engineering 103 Engineering Drawing 

GT 120 Technical Mathematics III 5 

Mathematics 114 Slide Rule 2 

*CT 150 ...Organic Chemistry . 5 

*CT 151 Industrial Chemical Analysis 3 



I 8 



*These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



.t> ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



(34) Civil Technology 



Civil Technology covers one of the broader fields in the Technical 
Institute Program. The civil technician is a surveyor, a construction 
man on buildings of all kinds, highways and railroads, hydroelectric 

projects, locks, dams, tunnel and similar projects. He is trained to 
handle work in any of these fields with a minimum of supervision. 

BCT 1 1 2 Construction Materials and Estimates 6 

Civ. T 121 Elementary Surveying 6 

Civ. T 122 Route Surveying 5 

Civ. T 131 Highway Construction 3 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212 Concrete Construction 5 

Civ. T 212 Structural Drafting I 2 

Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 2 

Civ. T 223 Land Surveys 5 

Civ. T 224 Topographic and Contour Surveying 4 

Civ. T 232 Heavy Construction 4 

Civ. T 241 Hvdraulics 6 



59 

(36) Electronics and Communication Technology 

This course gives the student training in the fields of electrical 
and electronic circuitry, transmission lines, radiation, wave filters, in- 
strumentation and test equipment, telephony. AM and FM radio, tele- 
vision and radar. 

Students completing the electronics course should be able to fill 
responsible positions as production and maintenance technicians and 
project and control technicians in the fields of radio, television and 
radar; electronics laboratory and research technicians and electronic 
equipment sales and service technicians. 

GT 120 Technical Mathematics III 5 

Shop Techniques 1 

Measurements 3 

Direct Current Circuits I 5 

Alternating Current Circuits I 5 

Basic Electronics 5 

Alternating Current Circuits II 3 

Industrial Electronics 6 
Advanced Electronics 

Semi-Conductors 5 

Communications Circuit I 6 

Communications Circuits II 6 

Electrical Machinery 3 

Communications Technology I 6 

Communications Technology II 6 

Television Technology 4 

73 



Elec 


T 109 


Flee 


Till 


Elec. 


T 121 


Elec. 


T 1 22 


Elec. 


T 131 


Elec. 


T 223 


Elec. 


T 232 


Elec. 


T 233 


Elec. 


T 234 


Elec. 


T 241 


Elec. 


T 242 


Elec. 


T 254 


Elec. 


T 261 


Elec. 


T 262 


Elec. 


T 263 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 37 



(32) Industrial Technology 

The curriculum in Industrial Technology is designed to enable the 
graduate to compete successfully for a variety of supervisory and man- 
agement positions in manufacturing industries. These positions are in 

such categories as personnel work, quality control, methods and <>>-\ 
control, and the equipment, pfenning and production functions. The 
graduate will also he qualified for many staff positions with transpor- 
tation, distributing and utility companies, and for the operation of 
private business. 

Economics 201 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 202 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 128T Principles of Marketing 5 

Business Adm. 101 Principles of Accounting 5 

Engineering 102 Engineering Drawing 2 

Engineering 103 Engineering Drawing 2 

Chemistry 101 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 102 General Inorganic 5 

*GT 111' Industrial Safety 1 '/. 

*IT 120 Manufacturing Processes 3 

*IT 121 Production Organization 3 

*IT 122 Economic Analysis 3 

*IT 123 Production and Cost Control 3 

*IT 124 Time and Motion Study 3 

*IT 125 Mechanical Methods 2 

*IT 126 Advanced Time and Motion Study 3 

*IT 127 Data Presentation 3 

*IT 128 Personnel Motivation 3 



6P/2 



(37) Mechanical Technology 

This field embraces the manufacture and production of mechani- 
cal products and the tools, machines and processes by which they are 
made. In a broad sense mechanical technology is the creation and utili- 
zation of mechanical power, and men with technical institute type of 
training in this field possess a knowledge that is basic to companies in 
nearly every line of business throughout the world. 

Positions open to mechanical technicians include various kinds of 
inspection, maintenance men. engineer's assistant, foreman in various 



*These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



58 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



fields, production supervisor 
.ind dies. 



and junioi designer of machines <>i tools 



Chemistry 101 
Chemistry 1"-' 
Economics 201 
Engineering 102, 

103 
Civ. T 143 
*MT 120 
*GT 111 
*IT 120 
*IT 125 
*MT 122 
*MT 123 
**MT 126 
*MT 127 
*MT 128 
*1T 124 



I General Inorganic 
General Inorganic 
Principles and Problems 

Engineering Drawing 

Mechanics of Materials 
Tools and Methods 
Industrial Safety 
Manufacturing Processes 
Mechanical Methods 
Machine Shop 

Metallurgy, Welding, Heat Tr. 
General Sheet Metal 
Industrial Electricity 
Fluid Mechanics 
Time. Motion Study 



5 
5 
5 

1 

(> 
5 

1'- 

3 

2 

5 

6 
3 

1 

5 
I 



62 J4 



'These courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor 

poration. 

This class will be conducted at the plant of the Great Dane Trailers. Inc. 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to 1 withdraw an) course 
foi which less than ten students register, 2) limit the enrollment in 
any course oi class section. 3 fix the time of meeting o\ all classes 
and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as demand and 
st.it I personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in languages where 
the same or similar courses have been presented for admission from 
high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description no 
credit for graduation will he given until the sequence is completed, 

tor example: Biology 101-102. 

Economics and Business Administration courses marked with a 
1 are terminal courses, and do not transfer to the University ol 
Georgia. Technical Institute courses transfer only to another Tech- 
nical Institute. 

After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. 
The first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second. 
the number of hours of laboratory; and the third, the number of 
quarter hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biology 111- 
General Botany I 3-4-5). 

Art 

Art \0\—Creatir,' Art (3-4-5). Spring. 

Drawing, painting and design principles, with some pertinent 
background history. Introductory practice in techniques, and applica- 
tion to every day life needs. 

Art 113— Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A beginner's course in the fundamentals of pottery and clay 
modeling. Various ways of forming clay, decorating, glazing and 
firing suitable subjects. 

Art 114 — Ceramics (5-0-5). 

A continuation of the beginner's course with emphasis on design, 
using the potter's wheel and understanding the use of glazes. Work 
may be developed in pottery or clay sculpture. 

Biology 

Biology 111— General Botany (3-4-5). Fall. 

A study of the structure of roots, stems and leaves, basic physi- 
ology and ecology of plants. Laboratory work on representative species. 



60 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Biology 112 — General Botany 3-4-5 . Spring. Prerequisite: Bi- 
ology 111. 

A study oi reproduction, heredity and evolution of seed plants, 
with studies of representative species of the other major plant groups. 
Laboratory work includes frequent field trips. 

Biology 114 — Genital Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. 
Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey of 
the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species of 

the basic invertebrate phyla. 

Biology 115 — General Zoology 3-4-5). Winter and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 114. 

Study of vertebrate structure and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. 

Biology 101-102 — Human Biology i 5-0-5 ) . Winter and Spring. 
Four lectures and one demonstration period. 

A non-laboratory course beginning with a survey of the basic- 
biological principles and continuing with a study of the structure 
and function of the human body. The second quarter is a continua- 
tion of the first and concludes with a study of the principles oi 
genetics and evolution. No credit for graduation is allowed until 
sequence is completed. 

Biology 118-119 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (3-4-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

A two-quarter course considering the gross anatomy, histology and 
physiology of the organ systems. Laboratory work includes thorough 
dissection of a typical mammal as well as basic experiments in physi- 
ology. Not for pre-medical and pre-dental students. 

Biology 200T — General Entomolgy I 5-0-5 ) . Spring. Prerequisite 
— One quarter of a laboratory biology. Four lectures and one demon- 
stration period each week. 

A study of the structure, biology, classification and control of 
important and significant insects as applied to man. 

Biology 210 — Microbiology (3-4-5). Spring. Prerequisites: Ten 
hours of a biological science with a laboratory and five hours of in- 
organic chemistry. 

An introduction to micro-organisms with primary emphasis on 
bacteria. The morphology, life history and public health importance 
of representative bacteria, molds, viruses, protozoa and helminthes are 
considered. 

Biology 220T — Clinical Laboratory I 3-4-5 ) . Prerequisite: Sopho- 
more standing. 

Sterilization of gloves and instruments: professional assistance to 



( ( >i RSE DESCRIP1 K >NS 61 



the doctor; injections; urinalysis, hemotology, hemoglobin determina- 
tion, KK(i and basal metabolism techniques. 

Biology 230 Comparativi Vertebrate Anatomy 3-6-6 , Fall. 
Prerequisite: Biology 111 and 115. 

A >t ucl\ of the anatomy and evolution ol the organ systems ol 
the vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

Business Administration 

Business Administration 101 Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory 5-0-5). Fall. Winter and Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures ol 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, working 
papers, accounting statements, controlling accounts, special journals 
and the voucher adjustment system. 

Business Administration 102 — Principles of Accounting, Introduc- 
tory (5-0-5)). Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 101. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of financial state- 
ments. 

Business Administration fl5 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Fall and Spring. 

Covers various aspects of business and technical report writing. 
Attention is given to vocabulary building, a review of the mechanics 
of grammar, and techniques of business writing. Letter studies include: 
sales, credit, collection, promotion, application, routine, personal, and 
formal. Information relative to effective policies in these areas is con- 
sidered. 

Business Administration 15 IT — Introduction to Transportation 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

History of transportation : development leading to legislative 
supervision of railroads; developments leading to Federal regulation 
of carriers, other than railroads: freight classifications: principles <>! 
freight rates and tariff. 

Business Administration 152T — Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 

(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 15 IT or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application: special freight serv- 
ices; freight claims, overcharge and loss and damage; freight tariff 
circulars; construction and filing of tariffs: terminal facilities and 
switching; and demurrage. 



62 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Business Administration 153T — Intermediate Rates and Tariffs. 
5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 152T or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Reconsignment and diversion: transit privileges; rules governing 

Stopping in transit shipments for partial unloading and to complete 
loading; weights, weighing, and payment of freight charges; ware- 
housing and distribution; material handling: and packaging. 

Business Administration 154T — Advanced Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-015). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 153T. or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Through routes and rates; milling in transit: technical tariff and 
rate interpretation; overcharges and undercharges; loss and damage 
claims; import and export traffic; and classification committee pro- 
cedure. 

Business Administration 155T — Interstate Commerce Lou . 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 154T. or 
permission of the instructor. 

Evolution of Interstate Commerce Act; construction of Interstate 
Commerce Act; interpretation and application of Interstate Commerce 
Act; application of penalties under the Interstate Commerce Act; 
creation and organization of Interstate Commerce Commission: prac- 
tice before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business Administration 156T — Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion and Public Service Commission Procedure (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 155T. or permission of the in- 
structor. 

Practice before Interstate Commerce Commission; statutory au- 
thority for awarding damages; revision of Commission's decision: 
general review. 

Business Administration 161T — Principles of Insurance (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 202. 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 
tion of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted 
insurance practices. 

Business Administration 162T — Real Estate Principles (5-0-5 . 
Prerequisite: Economics 202. 

A consideration of the general principles of property utilization, 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens; the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulatory legislation. 



COT RSE DESCRIPTIONS 63 



Business Administration 201T Principles of Accounting, Inter- 
mediate (5-0-5 . Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 101. 

Push accounting theory and the solution oi problems requiring <m 
application ol accounting theory. 

Business Administration 202'!' Intermediate Accounting 5-0-5). 
Second course. Prerequisite : Business Administration 201T. 

A continuation of Business Administration 201T emphasizing the 
theories of valuation of fixed assets and liability accounts, the appli- 
cation of these theories and the interpretation of financial statements 
prepared on the basis of these theories. 

Business Administration 207T — Business Laic (5-0-5). Fall. 

Law governing the basic principles applicable to the following 
subjects. Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, 
rights of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Business Administration 208T — Business Laic (5-0-5). Spring. 

The law governing the basic legal principles applicable to the fol- 
lowing subjects which are of particular interest to those planning to 
major in accounting. Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of 
partners, termination. Corporation: formation, power rights of se- 
curity holders, types of securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants. 
remedies. 

Business Administration 229T — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 101, 102. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
the order and the process methods. 

Business Administration 23 IT — Retailing (5-0-5). 

Basically a course in merchandising and promotion. Retailing 
also covers allied services such as stock and inventory control, ac- 
counting systems, mark-ups, and materials handling. A review is given 
on the basic elements of salesmanship and modern trends. Store de- 
sign, the effects of lighting, color dynamics, traffic and aisle display 
are illustrated. Delineation of the various advertising media is also 
involved. 

Business Administration 236T — Income Tax Accounting. Fall. 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 102. 

A study of federal income tax laws and the application of these 
laws to the income tax returns of individuals, partnerships and 
corporations. 



64 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Business Administration 237T Tax Accounting 5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 236T. 

A continuation of Business Administration 236T with emphasis 
on corporations and fiduciary returns and social security taxes, gift 
taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 260 — Principles of Management. (5-0-5). 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 101 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, Mathematics 9. or 
consent of instructor. 

A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry 
through the modern concept of the atom. Also, the sources, proper- 
ties and uses of some of the most important elements and compounds 
together with the solving of typical problems. 

Chemistry 102 — General Inorganic (4-3-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 101. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101, with emphasis 
on uses and applications. 

Chemistry 104 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 102. 

A systematic study of the separation and identification of the 
common cations and anions with the theoretical principles underlying 
these by semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 105 — Chemistry for Nurses 4-2-5). Fall. Principles of 
inorganic, organic, and physiological chemistry with special applica- 
tions to nursing practice. 

Chemistry 280a — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-6-4). Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Chemistry 104 or approval of the instructor. 

A study of the fundamental theories and applications of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods. No credit 
Is given for this course before completion of Chemistry 280b. 

Chemistry 280b — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 1-6-3 ) . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 280a or its equivalent. 

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 280a. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 65 

Commerce 

Commerce 101 Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Wintei and 
Spring. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. 

Commerce 102 — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). Fall. 
Winter and Spring. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is given. 

Commerce 103 — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 101-102 or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 111-112 — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall and Win- 
ter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand simplified. Reading dicta- 
tion and transcription from studied material. 

Commerce 113 — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-3). Spring. 
Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of 100 words a minute. 

Commerce 131 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall and Winter. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in 
the operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptoirr*"" 
thorough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to 
the operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calcu- 
lator. 

Commerce 132 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer i 0-5-2 ) . 
Fall and Winter. 

The following areas of business mathematics are reviewed and 
applied on the machine during this quarter; decimal equivalents, split 
division, invoicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts and 
chain discounts, cost, selling and rate of profit, and other business 
problems. 

Commerce 201 — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 103 or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. 



66 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Commerce 202 — A continuation of Commera 201 0-5-2 . Fall, 

Winter and Spring. 

Commerce 203— .4 continuation of Commera 202 0-5-2). Fall, 
Winter and Spring. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 21 1 — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-3). Fall. Prerequi- 
sites: Commerce 111. 112. 113 or equivalent. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are ap- 
plied in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in 
transcribing. Dictating and typing of mailable letters are emphasized. 

Commerce 212 — A continuation of Commerce 211 5-0-3 . Win- 
ter. A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 213 — Office Practice 5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 112 or equivalent. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 224 — Medical Terminology and Orientation 5-0- 
Prerequisite : Sophomore standing. The building of a medical vocabu- 
lary, use of medical dictionaries. Practice in dictation and transcrib- 
ing of medical material. 

Commerce 228 — Medical Office Procedure (5-0-3 . Prerequisite: 
Sophomore standing. 

Preparing, indexing and filing of patients' medical records; pa- 
tient management: patient finance: professional ethics: use of forms 
used by Medicare. Insurance. Workman's Compensation and Welfare 
Departments. Setting up and maintaining practical financial records. 

Economics 

Economics 101 — Principles and Problems of Economics 5-0-5 . 
Fall. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 102 — Principles and Problems of Economics 5-0-5 . 

Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 101. 

A continuation of the study of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 101. 

Economics 125T — Elementary Economic Statistics 5-0-5). 
An introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, table reading, chart making; elemen- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 6 



tary statistical procedures and tln-ii economic interpretation; intro- 
duction to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 126 American Economu History i. r )-()-5). 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
United States from the colonial period to the present with majoi 
emphasis on the period since I860. It will deal with agriculture, 
industry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, monc) 
and banking, and finance 

Economics 127T — Money and Banking 5-0-5 . Prerequisite: 
Economics 202. 

The role of money in the economic organization: monetary 
theory; methods of stabilizing the price level; the integration of finan- 
cial institutions: theory of bank deposits and elasticity of bank cur- 
rency; discount policy and the interest rate of central banks; methods 
of regulating credit and business activities. 

Economics 128T — Principles of Marketing (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 

Economics 202. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers; marketing functions; market- 
ing manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products: 
proposals for improving the marketing structure. 

Economics 129T — Labor Economics (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 202. 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern laboi 
organizations and their remarkable growth in recent years. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects of 
our labor problems including the study of wages, working conditions, 
unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hours, workers 
welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future develop- 
ments along these lines. 

Economics 130T — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Prerequi- 
sites: Psychology 201 and Economics 201. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
istration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded 
personnel program. 

Economics 131T — Government and Business 5-0-5). Prerequi- 
site: Economics 202. 

A general survey of the economic aspects of business regulation 
by the government, with specific reference to regulatory developments 
and methods in the United States; other activities affecting business 
in general, as extension of loans and subsidies, maintenance of fact- 
finding agencies and government owned corporation. 



68 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Economics 132T Investments. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Economics 
127T. 

A study of stocks and bonds, market operations, investment mathe- 
matics, investment policies and financial statements. 

Education 

Education 201 — Orientation to Teaching 5-0-5). Winter. 

For the beginning or prospective teacher, this subject offer- a 
broad understanding of the American spirit in education, the place of 
the school in society, its growth and changing function as a social in- 
stitution. The problem and discussion approach is used. 

Education 206 — Educational Psychology i 5-0-5). 

Special emphasis is placed upon developing competencies on the 
part of the prospective elementary and high school teachers in under- 
standing and applying the psychological principles involved in the 
growth and development of children and youth. Supervised visits 
will be made to schools for observation and study. 

Engineering 

Engineering 101 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-2). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: One year of plane geometry in high school or Mathe- 
matics 8. 

Topics of study include lettering; the use of the instruments: 
orthographic projection: auxiliary views: sections and conventions. 

Engineering 102 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-2). Winter and 

Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 101. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions; dimensions; pic- 
torial representation; threads and fastenings; shop processes; technical 
sketching: working drawings: pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 103 — Engineering Drawing 0-6-2). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Engineering 102. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fit- 
tings: working drawings; ink tracing on cloth: working drawings 
from assemblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 109 — Applied Descriptive Geometry (0-6-2). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 102. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines, and planes by use of auxiliary views; the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes by revolution methods; simple inter- 
sections: developments of surfaces; an introduction to warped sur- 
faces. Practical applications are emphasized. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Ml 



English 

Students will be assigned to freshman English according to re 

Its of tests taken before the beginning of the term. 



English 101 A Freshman English 5-0-5). Fall, Wintei and 
Spring. 

This course includes theme writing, with emphasis on correct 
and forceful expression. The student also reads and discusses such 
works as the Iliad, the Odyssey, and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles. 
Euripides and Aristophanes. 

English 101R — Freshman English | 4-2-5). 

This course will satisfy the requirements for the first quarter oi 
Freshman English. It is devoted to grammar, punctuation, spelling, 
vocabulary building, study habits, and organizational skills. The lab- 
oratory portion of the course is designed to help students who show 
a deficiency in reading and related skills. The student's reading diffi- 
culties will be diagnosed. Good reading techniques will be taught. 

English 102A — A continuation of English 101 A (5-0-5). Fall. 
Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: English 101 A. 

The student reads and discusses selections from such authors as 
Ibsen. Montaigne, Swift, Dickens and English and American poets. 
Theme writing is continued with practice in preparing documented 
papers. 

English 102B— A continuation of English LOIR (5-0-5). Winter. 
Spring. 

This course is essentially the same as English 102 A, but more time 
is given to correct expression in writing. A documented paper is pre- 
pared. 

English 110 — English for International Students (5-0-5). 

A course designed for foreign students, or for those who have 
a language difficulty because of a home environment when English 
is a secondary language. It stresses written and spoken English. 
American pronunciation, idiomatic phrases, and language appropriate 
to basic social situations and customs of the American people. 

English 201 — Sophomore English — World Literature 5-0-5 ) . Fall 
and Winter. Prerequisite: Freshman English (2 quarters). 

A study is made of some of the works of Shakespeare. Goethe's 
Faust, and selections from the Bible. 

English 202 — Sophomore English — World Literature 5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: Freshman English (2 quarters). 

Modern literature. The course includes selected modern poctr\ 



70 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



of 19th and 20th century British and American poets: plays by Ameri- 
can, British and continental authors; novels by such writers as Faulk- 
ner, Flaubert. Fitzgerald, Joyce, etc. 

English 227— Modern Drama (5-0-5). Fall. 

Class reading and discussion of modern plays from Ibsen's 
"Ghosts" to Miller's *'Death of a Salesman." The course is centered 
on appreciation of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 
leading selected plays aloud. 

English 228 — Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Winter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gives some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, 
phonetics, gesture, articulation, pronunciation, and regional speech 
differences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the funda- 
mentals of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, ex- 
temporaneous, impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 230— Principles of Theatre Art (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study and discussion of the fundamentals invoked in the de- 
velopment of dramatic art and in the staging methods which have 
been and are now utilized in producing drama. The course will 
develop chronologically and will relate directly to historical events 
and to the changing form and method of writing for the stage. 

English 250— Public Speaking (5-0-5). 

Construction and delivery of various types of extemporaneous 
speeches with emphasis on the organization of speeches, the prin- 
ciples of attention, the logical and psychological principles of think- 
ing and speaking, and practices in delivery. 

French 

French 101-102— Elementary French 10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

A course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well 
as grammar and reading. No credit for graduation will be given until 
the sequence is completed. No credit will be given for these courses 
if two years of high school French have been presented for entrance 
credit. 

French 201 — Intermediate French (5-0-5 . Spring. Prerequisite: 
Two quarters of college French or two years of high school French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 71 



/ ench 202 Intermediate French, continued 5-0-5 , Winter. 
Prerequisite: Three quarters oi college French or three years oi high 

school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 204 French Classical Drama 5-0-5). Spring. Prerequi- 
site: French 202. 

Selected plays of Corneille 3 Moliere and Racine. 

Geography 

Geography 111 — World Human Geography (5-0-5). 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activi- 
ties and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

German 

German 101-102 — Beginning German (10-0-10). Fall and Win- 
ter. 

Drill upon pronounciation and elements of grammar, conversation 
and the training of the ear as well as the eye. German is used as much 
as practicable in the classroom instruction. The idiomatic use of the 
language will be studied : reading of texts and translations, conversa- 
tion, dictation, and dialogues. 

No credit for graduation is allowed until sequence is completed. 

No credit will be given for these courses if two years of high 
school German have been completed. 

German 201 — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequi- 
site: Two quarters of college German or two years of high school 
German. 

Grammar review and comparative grammar studied with the view 
of enabling students to write compositions. Short stories, life situations 
in Germany. German magazines, memorization of famous German 
songs. Conversation and dialogues. 

Health 

Health 111 — Personal and Commuinty Health Problems (5-0-5). 

This course considers the meaning of health and factors influenc- 
ing health behavior: health problems as related to the individual: 



72 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



overview of world, national, state and local health problems; com- 
munity health organizations; mobilizing and evaluating community 
health resources. The legal aspects in community health and the 
laws governing reportable diseases is given special attention. 

History 

History 100 — Survey of American History (5-0-5 . 

This course is designed to satisfy the state law requiring that all 
students receiving degrees shall pass an examination on the history 
of the United States and of Georgia. 

History 114 — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). Fall. Winter. Spring and Summer. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main cur- 
rents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity in Western 
Civilization from the time of the ancient Mediterranean civilizations 
to the present era. Selected topics and periods are studied in greater 
detail by a careful reading of works by Plato. Dante. Machiavelli. 
Descartes and others. 

History 115 — A Continuation of History 114 5-0-5 . 

History 224— History of England (5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from early 
times to the present with special emphasis given to developments since 
the Tudor period. 

History 225 — Recent European History ( 5-0-5 i. Fall. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 
voted to the first World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing that war and the complex of world events which preceded the- Sec- 
ond World W r ar. 

History 226 — Recent American History 5-0-5). Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
( an life from about 1865 to the present time. 

Home Economics 

Home Economics 110— Orientations: Careers and Personal De- 
velopment (5-0-5). Fall. 

The many opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 7 I 



cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 
and others will be discussed. Professional experts in these Melds will 
visit the class to show the many vocations dealing with the home. 
Maturity, personality and personal grooming are emphasized. 

Horn* Economics 111- Elementary Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. 

Wardrobe planning and selection related to simple problems in- 
volving fundamental garment construction processes; care of clothing, 
including repair. 

Home Economics 112 — Family Meal Planning and Serving. 
3-4-5). Fall. 

Introductory course in food preparation, and serving of nutritious 

and palatable meals for the family. 

Home Economics 201 — Home Planning and Decorating [4-2-5). 

Winter. 

The interior and exterior planning of the home is studied. Em- 
phasis is placed on style of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economies 203 — Clothing for the Family (2-6-5). Spring. 
Planning the family wardrobe problems. Construction of garments 
for family member. 

Home Economics 204 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Fall. 
A course in the family with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

Home Economics 232 — Nutrition (5-0-5) . 

The requirements of different individuals for energy, protein, 
minerals and vitamins; foods as a source of daily requirements, and 
the relation of food and the state of nutrition of an individual to 
physical fitness. 

Home Economics 235 — Nutrition Education for Teachers. (5-0-5 . 

A study of the diet habits of Georgia school children and the re- 
lation of nutrition to health. Emphasis is placed on how teachers 
can enrich school and community programs and improve the health 
of school children through nutrition education. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics X — Basic Mathematics (5-0-0). Text: Essential 
Mathematics for College Students. 

This is a non-credit course and includes a study of the follow- 
ing topics: operations with integers, operations with common frac- 



74 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

lions and mixed numbers, operations with decimals, measurement. 
percentage, and elements of algebra. The last unit includes opera- 
tions with signed numbers, algebraic monomials and polynomials. 

Mathematics 8 — Plane Geometry (5-0-5). 

Topics of study include rectilinear figures, congruent triangles, 
the circle, similar figures and polygons. 

(Students will not receive college credit for this course if thc\ 
have completed one unit of high school credit in geometry.) 

Mathematics 9 — Intermediate Algebra (5-0-5). Fall. Winter, and 
Spring. 

This course includes a study of fractions, signed numbers, lineai 
and quadratic equations, ratio, proportion, variation and graphs. 

Mathematics 101 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. 

Prerequisite: Two units of high school algebra or Mathematics 9. 

This course consists of linear and quadratic equations, functions 
and graphs, systems of equations, inequalities, negatives and fractional 
exponents, variations, mathematical induction, the binomial theorem, 
theory of equations, and determinants. 

Mathematics 102 — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the solution of trigonometric equations, proof of trigonometric identi- 
ties, graphs of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric 
functions. 

Mathematics 103 — Mathematics of Finance (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 101. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: 
the operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple prob- 
lems concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and 
annuities. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The 
necessary aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be 
studied. 

Mathematics 104- -Analytic Geometry and Calculus (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 102. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, graphs of functions, 
limits, differentiation of algebraic functions and some applications of 
derivatives. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 75 

Mathematics 1 11 The Slide Rule 1-2-2). 

An intensive study and practice in the use of all scales including 
the solutions of problems using the trigonometric scales. 

Mathematics 201 Calculus 5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 104, 

This course includes the differentiation and integration of poly- 
nomials, problems in maxima and minima, approximations by differ- 
entials, areas, volumes, centroids, moment of inertia and work. 

Mathematics 202— Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. 

A continuation of Mathematics 201. This course includes differ- 
entiation of transcendental functions with application to rates, velocity 
and acceleration, curvature and Newton's Method. It also includes 
formulas and methods of integration. 

Mathematics 203 — Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 

A continuation of Mathematics 202. This course includes Simp- 
son's rule, indeterminate forms, series, hyperbolic functions, partial 
derivatives and multiple integrals. 

Music 

Music 110— Music Theory. (5-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to the fundamentals of music theory through 
sight-singing, dictation, part-writing and keyboard harmony. The 
ability to read notes is essential for this course. 

Music 111 — Music Theory (5-0-3). Winter. 

A continuation of Music 110. with emphasis on part-writing of 
triads and their inversions, the dominant seventh chord, sight-singing, 
dictation and keyboard harmony. 

Music 112 — Music Theory (5-0-3). Spring. 

A continuation of Music 1 1 1 through derivations and inversions 
of the dominant seventh chord, triads on all degrees and secondary 
seventh chords, sight-singing, dictation and keyboard harmony. 

Music 200 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and re- 
corded sessions comprise the course. 



76 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Applied Music Courses 

Applied music courses consist of private instruction in voice or 
an instrument. Two hours credit is received per quarter with six hours 
credit possible per year. A special applied music fee is charged for 
these courses as indicated under the course descriptions. 

No practice facilities are available at the college. The student 
must have access to private practice facilities in order to enroll for 
applied music courses. 

Music 116 a, b,c — Woodwind Instrument. 2 hours credit per quar- 
ter. One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 117 a,b,c — Violin. 2 hours credit per quarter. 

One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 118 a,b,c — Piano. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 119 a,b,c — Voice. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
One one-hour private lesson per week. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 216 a,b,c — Woodwind Instruments. 2 hours credit per 
quarter. A continuation of Music 116c. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 217 a,b,c — Violin. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 117c. Special fee $48.00. 

Music 218 a,b,c — Piano. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 118c. Special fee $45.00. 

Music 219 a,b,c — Voice. 2 hours credit per quarter. 
A continuation of Music 119 c. Special fee $45.00. 

Philosophy 

Philosophy 110— Introduction to Philosophy (5-0-5 . 

The fundamentals of philosophy, the meaning and function of 
philosophy, the vocabulaiy and problems of philosophy, and the rela- 
tion of philosophy to art, science and religion. Includes a survey of 
the basic issues and major types in philosophy, and shows their sources 
in experience, history and representative thinkers. 

Philosophy 222 — Honors Seminar 5-0-5). 

The Honors Seminar will study some aspects of the nature ot 
man in the natural world. The aim of the seminar will be to integrate 
what has been approached as specialization in the general curriculum. 
Instructors from the natural sciences, the humanities and the social 
sciences will serve as discussion leaders. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 77 



This course is open l>\ imitation to sophomores placed on tin 
Permanent Dean's List at the end of their freshman \c;u and to othei 
sophomores who a\<-' recommended l>\ then advisors. 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 111 Conditioning Course 0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries 
load work, duel combatives. and simple games. 

Physical Education 112 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 113 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring 

•Physical Education 114 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). Win- 
ter. 

Prerequisite: P. E. 112 or equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substitute for P. E. 112. 

•Physical Education 200 — First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3) 
Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
by a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 201 — Elementary Tennis. (0-3-1). Fall. 

^Physical Education 203 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' 
Course in Swimming (2-3-2). Spring. May be substituted for Physical 
Education 1 13. 

Physical Education 205— Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 206 — Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 207 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1). Win- 
ter. 

Physical Education 208 — Adult Recreative Sports. (0-3-1 ) . Spring. 

Physical Education 232— Bowling (0-3-1). Winter. 



^Elective unless substituted as written in course description. 



78 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Physical Science 

Physical Scienct 101 (5-0-5). Fall. No prerequisite. 

A study of the scientific method and its use in man's solutions of 
[lis physical environment and the nature of things about him, the 
"whys'" and "wherefores'' or the correlation of the physical universe. 
The student learns the fundamentals of physics and acquires fami- 
liarity with the basic formulas and principles. He learns the similarity 
of the application of principles involving small particles to larger or 
planetary particles. If student has completed a course in college 
physics, no credit will be given for this course. 

Physical Science 102 (5-0-5). Winter. No prerequisite. 

A continuation of Physical Science 101. In this course emphasis 
is placed on the study of the principles of inorganic and organic chem- 
istry with some examples of the application of chemistry in household, 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 
structure of the fundamental particles of matter (atoms and molecules) 
is used in the study of the classification of the simple components of 
matter (elements) and the changes which they undergo to form more 
complex substances (compounds). If the student has completed a 
course in college chemistry, no credit will be given for this course. 

Physical Science 103 (5-0-5). Spring. No prerequisite. 

A survey of elementary Geology and Astronomy. This course 
covers what might be termed a "Biology of the Earth", concerning 
itself with earth materials, weather and climate, rocks and minerals, 
erosion and sedimentation, vulcanism and diastrophism. the law ol 
uniform change and earth history as interpreted from the rock record. 
Upon completion of this phase the course progresses to the Astronomy 
phase and the study of the stars and Galaxies. Starting with the 
Planetary System of our own Sun, the study proceeds to the other 
Stars and Stellar Systems, including, of course, the Nebulae. Finally. 
the course covers general relativity and cosmology entering the fron- 
tiers of Physical Science to conjecture on the "Science of Tomorrow." 

Physics 

Physics 204— General Physics— Mechanics | 4-2-5 ) . Fall. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 and 102 or consent of the in- 
structor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of mechanics. Force and motion, work and power, 
energy, torque, and properties of gases are included. 

Physics 205— General Physics— Electricity | 4-2-5 ) . Winter. 
Prerequisites: Math 101 and 102 or consent o\ the instructor. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 7" 



Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covei 
ing the fields of magnetism, electric circuits, electric enemy and powei 
electromagnetic induction, and principles of alternating current. 

Physics 206 General Physics Heat, Sound, and Light (4-2-5 . 
Spring. Prerequisite: Math 101 and 102 or consent of the instructor, 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work cover- 
ing the fields of heat, sound and fight. Under heat will he studied tem- 
perature measurement, thermal expansion, heat quantities, heat trans- 
fer, and thermodynamics. The study of sound includes wave motion, 
sound waves, and acoustics. Light includes reflection, refraction, spec- 
tra, color, and optics. 

Physics 207 Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 104 or 201, or concurrent. 

Physics 207, 208 and 209 together constitute a thorough course in 
basic physics for engineers. The five hours of class include one or two 
demonstration lectures per week. The solution of a large number of 
problems is required and the course includes application of the ele- 
ments of calculus. 

The laboratory work is designed to give practice in the art of 
making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipulation of ap- 
paratus and added familiarity with some of the concepts of physics. 
The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students the ability to 
decide under what conditions the greater expense of more precise 
measurements is justified. 

Physics 207 is an intensive course in mechanics. It includes the 
study of statics, kinetics, friction, work, power, energy, machines, 
elasticity, hydrostatics, hydraulics and the mechanics of gases. 

Physics 208 — Electricity (5-3-6). Winter. Prerequisite: Same as 
for Physics 207. 

Physics 208 is an intensive course in electricity. It includes the 
study of magnetism, static electricity, electric circuits, electric energy. 
and power, electromagnetic induction and the principles governing 
AC circuits as well as a study of some electrical instruments 

Physics 209 — Heat, Sound and Li^ht (5-3-6). Spring. Prerequi- 
sites: Same as Physics 207. 

Physics 209 is an intensive course in heat, sound and Light. It 
includes the study of heat, sound, light and atomic physics. Laboratory 
exercises include temperature measurement, thermal expansion, heat 
quantities, heat transfer, thermodynamics, wave motion, sound waxes. 
resonance, acoustics, reflection and refraction of light, the quantum 
theory, spectra and color, optics, and some optical instruments. 



80 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Political Science 

Political Science 112 — The Governments of Foreign Powers. 
(5-0-5). 

A study is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. 

Political Science 113 — Government of the United States (5-0-5 . 
Fall, Winter and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, and workings of the na- 
tional government in the United States and some of the major prob- 
lems of the state and local government. The course shows how devel- 
opmental practice has created our government as it stands today. 

Psychology 

Psychology 100T — Psychology of Adjustment 5-0-5 ) . Fall. Winter 
and Spring. 

This course is an orientation into college and into the choice of a 
career. The objective aids developed in the field of psychology will be 
used to discover effective ways of learning in general, and of studying 
in the college setting. Methods of objective measurement of a person's 
intelligence, interests, special aptitudes and personality traits will be 
explored and demonstrated. These will be applied to problems of edu- 
cational, vocational, and special interest training. Insofar as possible 
each student will have an opportunity to develop projects in the fields 
that will be useful in his own plans for education and career. Special 
emphasis is placed upon the understanding of learning processes and 
the motivation of behavior. 

Psychology 201 — Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall, Winter 
and Spring. 

Psychology is the scientific study of individual human behavior. 
This course introduces the student to how the basic psychological proc- 
esses operate and affect the behavior of the individual. Facts about 
patterns of growth from birth to maturity, learning to observe and deal 
objectively with the real world, motivation, emotions, conflict and 
frustration are explored and applied to the student's present daily 
experience. Special study is given to unconscious influences on behavior 
in the study of mechanisms of defense and ways of directing these 
processes into more realistic and creative use of one's feelings, under- 
standings and actions. By the end of the course the student is expected 
to be able to see these processes at work in a given example of behavior 
and to begin to see the interaction of all these processes in a given act 
or experience. In the seminar type of class discussion the locus is on 
one of these topics at a time. The discussion objective is for each stu- 



CO! RSE DESCRIPTH >NS 81 

dent, aftei study, to share his concept of the topic <>i some phase of n 
link it with tin- information in tin- text, and test it againsl his own ex- 
periences. 

Psychology 202T Experimental Psychology 5-0-5 .Spring. Pre- 
requisite : Psychology 201 . 

In this course the principles explained in Psychology 201 will be 
tested and explored by special projects and experimentation. Each stu- 
dent will select from a choice of topics introduced in 201 at least one 
systematic experiment, develop his plan of procedure, cany out his 
study according to approved objective methods and prepare a sati^ 
factory written report. Class time will be used for group consultation in 
order that each member will follow the work of each other student and 
for class guidance and criticism. Topics suitable for a special study 
project include aspects of child development or special behavior 
aspects of children, maturation, emotions, conflict, frustrations, mecha- 
nisms of defense, sensory processes, perception, learning, remembering, 
thinking, personality adjustment. 

Psychology 203— Social Psychology (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

This course centers on a study of the individual's interaction with 
his social groups ( family, friendship groups, clubs, church groups, com- 
munity groups ) . Forces of need, emotion and interests that bind the 
individual to his groups and the dynamic forces of group interaction 
are analyzed. The live laboratory of the class itself is used for experi- 
encing the processes of communication and interaction in a group 
setting. Special topics of attitude formation, leadership, group con- 
flicts, social stratification, mass communication, propaganda, public 
opinion formation and methods of changing group patterns are studied 
by consulting the reports of responsible studies and by group projects. 

Psychology 204T — Applied Industrial Psychology (5-0-5). 

This course applies psychology to special problems in industry. A 
study is made of causation in behavior, leadership, testing, training and 
fatigue, with a view to developing the technique of working with su- 
periors, associates and subordinates. Methods of objective measure- 
ments of a person's intelligence, interests, aptitudes and personality 
traits will be explored and demonstrated. Special problems of person- 
nel management and production will be considered. 

Psychology 205 -Developmental Psychology ,5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Psychology 201. 

This course presents tested information on how growth, develop- 
ment and learning affect the behavior of human beings from concep- 
tion through childhood and adolescence. Systematic study of respon- 
sible research in this field, from life-study, clinical and experimental 
research methods, is the basis for class seminar and lecture. To supple- 



82 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



ment study of the literature projects arc planned foi direct observation 
of child behavior in a nursery school, in various elementary school 
classes and in informal settings. When possible, special areas receive 
special study, such as testing programs, problems of exceptional chil- 
dren, child therapy or typical problems in child-parent relations and 
child placement. 

Russian 

Russian 101- 102— Elementary Russian 10-0-10). 

This course consists of grammar, composition, conversation, read- 
ing and dictation. No credit will be allowed toward graduation until 
the sequence is completed. 

Social Science 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia | 5-0-5 ) . 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce; population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 

Sociology 

Sociology 201 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall, Winter. 

Sociology is the scientific study of human behavior at the group 
level. This course presents material which has been gathered by system- 
atic and objective studies of human society. Material is introduced 
from the fields of cultural anthropology and social psychology. In this 
way an understanding is gained not only of the function of culture as 
a factor in the socialization of the individual but also of the role of the 
individual as a member of his own society. Attention is then turned to 
some of the major institutions of this society, and finally to a theoretical 
consideration of the operation of social processes. Emphasis throughout 
is upon the application of the scientific method to the <tud\ of social 
phenomena. 

Sociology 202 — Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Fall. Winter, 
Spring. 

This course is designed as a functional approach to the study ol 
the problems of marriage in our society. As a background to a study of 
the family as an institution marriage customs and family relationships 
from other cultures are studied. The rest of the course focuses on the 
individual within our own culture. Each stage in the preparation for 
marriage is discussed: dating, courtship, engagement, marriage, adjust- 
ment to money, sex. religion, in-laws, friends and children. A promi- 
nent physician is guest lecturer on specialized information affecting the 
physical adjustment to marriage and parenthood. Other guest lecturers 



( ( >l RSE DES( KIl'TK >NS 



include representatives from the legal and insurance professions. In 
this course the student is provided with information which will encour- 
age a mature and objective approach to the problems and responsibili- 
ties inherent in marriage and family relationships in our present-da) 

society. 

s lology203Ti Community and Social Problems 5-0-5 .Spring. 

The purpose of this course is to stud) tin- facts, problems, and pro- 
grams of community life, using Savannah and Chatham County as 
resources to supplement information from responsible scientific studies 
available in the professional literature. In addition to exploring the 
nature and origins of social problems in general, attention will be di- 
rected to such special areas as community physical and mental health, 
problems of poverty, unemployment, education, government, juvenile 
and adult crime, care for dependent children, housing recreation, re- 
sources for the aged, problems of community planning, and group con- 
flicts. The course will include seminar discussion, individual study 
of some problems of special interest, guest speakers and selected field 
trips. This additional knowledge, understanding and experience with 
systematic study of community life is aimed to contribute to the stu- 
dent's constructive involvement, as a citizen, in the life of his commu- 
nity. 

Spanish 

Spanish 101-102— Elementary (10-0-10). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. No 
credit for graduation will be given until sequence is completed. No 
credit will be given for these courses if two years of high school Spanish 
have been completed. 

Spanish 201 — Intermediate (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Two quarters of college Spanish or two years of 
high school Spanish. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar, conversation and readings. 

Spanish 202— Intermediate 5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Spanish 201. 
Continuation of Spanish 201. 

Spanish 203 — Survey of Spanish- American Literature (5-0-5 . 

Prerequisite: Spanish 202. 

Outline of Spanish-American Literature and critical appreciation. 



84 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

Courses are designated as follows: 

GT — General Technology for courses which arc common to sev- 
eral concentrations. 

CT — Chemical Technology. 

IT — Industrial Technology. 

BCT — Building Construction Technology. 

Elec. T — Electronic and Communications Technology. 

Civ. T — Civil Technology. 

MT — Mechanical Technology. 

General Technology 

*GT 111— Industrial Safety (I/2-O-I/2) . 

A basic study of industrial accident prevention considering the 
nature and extent of the accident problem. A practical study is given 
the technique for control of industrial hazards together with the funda- 
mentals of good organization. 

*GT 112— Public Speaking. (3-0-3). Prerequisite: English 101 or 
the equivalent. 

Study and practice in the fundamentals of public speaking. The 
subject includes training in selecting a subject, obtaining and organiz- 
ing material, and presenting speeches effectively. Each student makes 
several speeches before an audience. 

*GT 113— Technical Report Writing (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Eng- 
lish 101 or the equivalent. 

Study of the fundamentals of technical writing style and mechan- 
ics with practice in preparing reports of various types most likely to be 
used on the job by technicians. 

Technical Mathematics 

These courses are specifically designed for students who intend 
eventually to enter some field of technology. Special emphasis has been 
placed on the applications of mathematical principles to a wide range 
of specific engineering situations. 

GT 114 — Technical Mathematics I (5-0-5). 

This course covers the slide rule, a review of arithmetic and geom- 
etry, basic algebra, analytic geometry, more advanced algebra, and 
logarithms. 1 Mathematics 101 mav be taken instead.) 



•Glasses to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



COURSE DESCRIPTN >NS 

GT 115 Technical Mathematics II 5-0-5 . Prerequisite ( .i 
11 1. 

lhiv course consists of an introduction to analytical trigonometry, 
numerical trigonometry of the right triangle, oblique triangles and ap- 
plications of numerical trigonometry, and vector algebra. Mathemat- 
ics 102 may be taken instead. 

GT 120 Technical Mathematics III 5-0-5 . Prerequisite: Gl 

1 1"). 

An application of mathematics to problems ordinarily not solvable 
h\ algebra or trigonometry. The subject consists mainly of an introduc- 
tion to differentiation and integration. The application of the calculus 
is directed toward problems pertinent to the student's major field of 
study. Mathematics 104 and 201 may be taken instead.) 

GT 121— Applied Higher Mathematics 5-0-5). 

A continuation of GT 120 with operational techniques. 

Building Construction Technology 

BCT 121 — Graphics 3-9-6). Prerequisite: Engineering 101. 

An introductory study in architectural drawing and the principles 
of visual design. This subject equips the student with a basic knowledge 
of drawing sections, plans, perspective and presentation drawing in ink. 

BCT 142 — Construction Materials and Estimates 5-2-6). 

An introduction to the materials most commonly used in the erec- 
tion of structures, and the preparation of material and labor quantity 
surveys from actual working drawings and specifications. 

BCT 211 — Wood and Steel Construction (3-6-5). Prerequisite: 
Civ. T 143. 

A study of the design of beams, girders and columns in both wood 
and steel. Included is a study of the various timber fasteners, steel and 
timber trusses and steel frameworks. 

BCT 212 — Concrete Construction (3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 
143. 

A study of the properties of reinforced concrete with the determi- 
nation of direct stresses and bending stresses in beams, slabs, girders 
and columns. Laboratory work consists of problems and a study of the 
methods of testing various concrete members. 

BCT 222— Building Design I 3-9-6). Prerequisites BCT 121 and 
BCT 142. 

Residential Design. This subject requires of each student a com- 
plete presentation drawing, a complete set of working drawings and a 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

complete set oi specifications for a dwelling house. Scale models will 
be built from working drawings by groups of students. 

BCT 223 Building Design II 3-9-6). Prerequisites: BGT 222 
and BCT 211. 

Architectural design, working and structural drawings of more 
complex structures than those studied in BCT 222. Structural compu- 
tations are required. 

BCT 224— Building Design III 3-9-6). Prerequisite: BCT 223. 
A continuation of BCT 223. 

BCT 231— Architectural History (3-0-3). 

A study of the progress of architecture. The material covered in- 
cludes a review of architectural forms from early Egyptian to modern 
Engineered Architecture. 

BCT 243— Building Equipment (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Physics 206. 

A brief survey of the principles of heating, ventilating, plumbing, 
air-conditioning, lighting and electric wiring of buildings from the con- 
struction point of view. 

Chemical Technology 

CT 120 — Introduction to Industrial Statistics (3-0-3). Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 101. 

An introduction to the application of statistical analysis to techni- 
cal problems. The concept of distributions is developed, simple tests of 
significance and linear correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed 
upon the practical application of statistics rather than upon theory. 

*CT 121— Experimental Design (3-0-3). Prerequisite: CT 120. 

Advanced statistical work, including problems in the determination 
of the proper procedure to be followed in gaining maximum informa- 
tion from given data. A study of experimental methods designed to 
produce adequate result data at a minimum expenditure of time and 
money. 

*CT 140— Pulping (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102. 

A brief summary of all commercial pulping processes in use, in- 
cluding a study of wood species, chemicals used, cooking conditions, 
characteristics of pulp, and recovery processes. Also included is a thor- 
ough study of pulping processes now in widespread use in the South. 
with emphasis on the sulphate pulping of pine. 

*CT 141— Paper Machinery (5-0-5). Prerequisite: CT 140. 
The study of the function and operation of the various machines 
used for the conversion of pulp to the finished product, including the 

♦Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



( OURSE DESCRIF1 IONS «7 



component pans and associated equipmenl of the fourdriniei mai hine. 
A survey of the leading types oi machines used in the furthei processing 
of paper and paperboard foi the production oi bags, boxes and similai 
products. 

( T Wl Papei Testing 1-1-:'. . Prerequisite: CT 140. 
A stuck of the physical properties of paper and paperboard with 
emphasis on the characteristics commonly tested. Details ol the con- 
struction, principle and operation of testing equipment are studied. 

*( T 143— Pulp Testing I 1-4-3). Prerequisite: CT 140. 

A comrehensive review of standard mill and laboratory ul test- 
ing equipment and procedures. The interrelationships of different pulp 
properties are studied, together with the theoretical and practical con- 
siderations of permanganate number and other measures of the degree 
of pulping. 

*CT 150— Organic Chemistry (5-0-5). 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 102 and Chemistry 280b. 

A classroom survey of the types of organic compounds, their names 
and structures, preparation, properties and reactions, including elec- 
tronic mechanisms involved in the reactions. 

*CT 151 — Industrial Chemical Analysis (3-0-3). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 280b. 

The application of chemical principles to industrial processes of 
water treatment, paper manufacture, waste disposal, acid manufacture 
and various other related processes in the paper industry. 

CT 160 — Material Balances (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Mathematics 
101 or GT 114, Chemistry 101, 102, Physics 204, 205, 206. 

This course is designed to give intensive, qualitative training in 
the practical applications of the principles of chemistry and physics to 
the solution of problems associated with industrial chemical processes. 
This portion of the course is mainly concerned with establishing mate- 
rial flows through process, including the development of methods of 
predicting mis-information from generalized principles. 

CT 161— Energy Balances (3-0-3). Prerequisite: CT 160. 

A continuation of Civ. T 160 to include the energy requirements 
of chemical process. Insofar as possible the problems are related to 
actual data from operation in a kraft paper pulp mill. 

*CT 162 — Elementary Chemical Process (4-0-4). Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 280b, CT 160. 

A study of the transformation of energy and heat transfer, evapo- 
ration, distillation, drying, and flow of fluids. 

*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



88 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



( r 164 Wood Structures and Properties 3-2-4 .Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 101, ii)2. Physics 204. 205. 206. 

A course covering the basic process of the formation of wood fibers 
in the living plant and the changes which occur during and after the 
life of the plant. A resume of physical and chemical characteristics of 
southern woods, and the means by which these characteristics may be 
controlled or altered. 

*CT 165 — Industrial Chemistry 4-0-4 . Prerequisite: Chemistry. 

The course covers fundamental chemical processes and reactions 
used in the manufacturing of a lame variety of chemical compounds. 
It also gives a general view of the problems of the chemical industry. 

Civil Technology 

Civ. T 121 — Elementary Surveying (3-9-6). Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 102 or GT 1 15, or concurrently. 

Construction, care and use of surveying instruments: theory and 
practice of chaining; differential and profile leveling: traversing: com- 
putation of areas and earthwork: theory and practice of stadia and its 
application to topographic surveying; U. S. Gov't, system of public land 
surveys; reduction and plotting of field notes: the interpretation and 
plotting of field notes of topographic surveys. 

Civ. T 122— Route Surveying 3-6-5 . Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 

Reconnaissance, preliminary location and construction surveys for 
routes of all kinds, including simple, compound and reverse curves used 
on highways and railroads: superelevation of curves: computations of 
earthwork: construction of quantity, mass and haul diagrams. For a 
final project each laboratory group must lay out a complete highway 
location with each student submitting a complete set of plans, profiles. 
cross sections and earthwork computations for this location. 

Civ. T 131 — Highway Construction 3-0-3 . Prerequisite: Civ. T 
122. 

A study of highway location, grading, drainage, surfacing, main- 
tenance and administration. 

Civ. T 143 — Mechanics of Materials 5-3-6 . Prerequisites: Phys- 
ics 204 and Mathematics 102 or GT 115. 

A study of coplanar forces and force systems, truss solutions, force 
systems in space, friction and centroids; direct sticss. properties of ma- 
terials, riveted and welded joints, torsions stresses in beams, beam de- 
flection, and columns. 



'( L -M>s to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



( oi RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Civ. T212 Structural Drafting 1 0-6-2). Prerequisite: Engineer- 
ing 101. 

Structural steel framing practices and preparation ol shop drawing 
for steel fabi ication. 



212. 



Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 0-6-2 . Prerequisite: Civ. T 



Preparation of detail drawings for concrete structures. 

Civ. T 223— Land Surveys 3-6-5). Prerequisite: Civ. T 121. 
Theor) and practice of land surveying; sub-divisions; filing and 

recording deeds: U. S. system of land subdivisions. U. S. ( oast and 
Geodetic plane coordinate systems: county and state laws; computa- 
tions on astronomical observations for azimuth determination. Georgia 

Land Lot system of land subdivision. 

Civ. T 224 — Topographic and Contour Surveying 2-6-4). Pre- 
requisite: Civ. T 121. 

Theory, description and use of advanced surveying instruments 
and methods; practice of state and local coordinate systems for cadas- 
tral surveys and construction work; field work for the design and con- 
struction of engineering projects; use of the Plane Table on topo- 
graphic surveys; theory, description and purposes of the many types of 
maps, plans and profiles used by engineers: hydrographic surveying: 
altimetry. 

Civ. T 252— Heavy Construction (3-3-4). Prerequisite: BCT 142. 

Heavy construction practices. This subject acquaints the student 
with the many common pieces of heavy construction equipment and 
apparatus; operation, use, limitations and maintenance of this equip- 
ment are covered along with the methods, organization and manage- 
ment for both large and small jobs. Field trips are made to construction 
projects to illustrate the usage of various pieces of equipment. 

Civ. T 241— Hydraulics (6-0-6). Prerequisites: Physics 204 and 

Civ. T 143. 

Elementary principles of hydraulics with special emphasis on static 
pressure, flow through pipes, channels, and over weirs. A survey of the 
operation of water and sewage treatment plants is included. Several 
field trips are scheduled. 

Electronics and Communications Technology 

Elec. T 109— Shop Techniques (0-3-1). 

A study of shop procedures with methods of coil winding and 
transformer construction. Manufacturing techniques, testing and serv- 
ice procedure — wiring practices and the National Electrical Code. 



90 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Printed circuit techniques and problems related to mechanized assem- 
bly techniques. 

Elec. T 111 Measurements | 3-3-3). 

Development of electrical units — Experimental procedures, errors 
and aids to computation. A comprehensive study of galvanometers, 

standard cells, bridges and oscilloscopes. Measurements of mutual in- 
ductance and magnetic circuits. Laboratory to include the correct pro- 
cedure in the use of industrial and laboratory test equipment, such as, 
VTVM, Q meters, frequency meters, etc. 

Elec. T 121 — Direct Current Circuity 5-3-5). Prerequisite: GT 
114. 

Fundamental concepts of D-C, including electron theory. Ohm's 
Laws, Thevinin's and Superposition Theorem and other theorems 
which aid in the simplification of networks. A comprehensive study of 
D-C instruments and measurements and their use in the laboratory to 
determine and verify the basic principles of electricity. Laboratory ex- 
periments to coincide with classroom study. 

Elec. T 122 — Alternating Current Circuity I 5-3-5). Prerequi- 
sites: Elec. T 121 and GT 115. 

The fundamental study of sinusoidal voltages and current wave- 
forms — the resistive, inductive and capacitive circuits along with their 
combinations. Series and parallel networks. A comprehensive study of 
vector analysis and complex notation. Laboratory experiments to coin- 
cide with classroom study and to verify theoretical work — become fa- 
miliar with oscilloscopes. 

Elec. T 131— Basic Electronics (5-3-5). Prerequisite: Elec. T 121. 

Basic study of the control of free electrons in elementary electronic 
circuits. Electron emission, classification and characteristics of high- 
vacuum tubes, tube characteristics curves. Rectification, amplification, 
amplification factor, trans-conductance plate resistance, load lines, 
stage gain and basic amplifier circuits. Types of bias. Classification and 
characteristics of gas-filled, vapor-filled, and cathode ray tubes. Hard- 
tube and soft-tube voltage regulator circuits. Conversion efficiency, 
ripple factor and circuit analysis of single-phase, half-wave, full-wave 
and bridge rectifier circuits. 

Elec. T 223 — Alternating-Current Circuits II (3-3-3). Prerequi- 
sites: Elec. T 122 andGT 120. 

Study of polyphase circuits, balanced and unbalanced, including 
circuit analysis, distribution systems, transformers and transforms 
connections, rectifier circuits and instrumentation. 

Elec. V" 232 — Industrial Electronics 5-3-6 . Prerequisites: Elec. 
T 122. Mathematics 104 or GT 120. Elec. T 131. 

Study of basic industrial electronic circuits and application ot these 



c OI RSE DESCRIPl IONS 91 

circuits to such devices as electronic timers, voltage regulators, eta tro- 
static air cleaners, motoi and generatoi control systems, photo-electri< 
systems, web and register control systems, and induction and dielectric 
heating equipment. 

Elec. 7*233 Advanced Electronics '>-'•- 1 .Prerequisites: Elec. T 
261 or concurrently; Elec. T 232. 

A study of special electronic circuits, including thyratrons, igni- 
trons, phototubes, wave shaping circuits, klystrons and magnetrons. 
AKo more advanced circuitry using conventional tubes laboratory to 
include application and illustration of the above circuits. 

KL ( . T 234 Semiconductors 5-3-5 . 

Familiarization of transistors, diodes and other semiconductor de- 
vices, Theory, application and operational characteristics of semicon- 
ductors. Laboratory experiments to include investigation of transistors 
and other semiconductors circuitry and behavior. 

Elec. T 241 -Communications Circuits I (5-3-6). Prerequisite: 
Physics 205. 

Study of the operating principles of telephone equipment and cir- 
cuits. Local-battery and common battery manual exchanges, step-by- 
step and all-relay automatic exchanges. Basic relay circuits for digital 
control. Matched transmission lines for audio frequencies, distributed 
and lumped line constants, pads and attenuators, constant-k and m-de- 
rived filters for low-pass, high-pass, band-pass and band-elimination. 
"Pi", "T", and "LL" sections. 

Elec. T 242 — Communications Circuits II (5-3-6). Prerequisites: 
Elec. T 261, or concurrently. 

Micro wave technique concepts and practical applications. Imped- 
ence-matching concepts and methods, transmission-line circle diagram, 
propagation, standing waves, basic antenna theory, antennas for low- 
frequency and high-frequency applications, and high-frequency meas- 
uring techniques, including radar and transmitting and receiving sys- 
tems. 

Elec. I '254— Electrical Machinery (2-3-3). Prerequisites: Elec. T 
223. or concurrently. 

Survey of electrical rotating machines, direct and alternating cur- 
rent. Construction, characteristics, operation and control and industrial 
applications of d-c. single-phase, a-c and polyphase a-c motors and 
generators. 

Elec. T 261 — Communications Technology I (5-3-6). Prerequi- 
sites: Elec. T 241, Elec. T 232. 

The study of voltage amplification as applied to radio-frequency 
and audio-frequency circuits. Analysis of amplifier circuits and coup- 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



ling methods, radio-frequency tuning circuits, regeneration and genera- 
tion circuits, decoupling networks and basic oscillatoi circuits. Con- 
struction, tuning, and alignment of superheterodyne receivers. 

Elec. T 262— Communications Technology II 5-3-6 . Prerequi- 
sites: Elec. T 233, Elec. T 261. 

Advanced study of radio communication circuits. Amplitude-mod- 
ulated transmitters, powei amplifiers, phase Inverters, push-pull ampli- 
fiers and modulator circuits. Broadcast studio techniques, recorders, 
and recording and control room equipment. 

Elec. T 263 — Television Technology 3-3-4). Prerequisite: Elec. 

T 233, Elec. T 262. 

Principles of frequency modulation, methods of modulation and 
demodulation. FM transmitter and receiver circuits. Federal Com- 
munications Commission standards for television transmission. Camera 
and picture tubes, composite video signal, television receiver circuits, 
power supplies, video amplifiers, deflection circuits, alignment proce- 
dures, transmitters circuits and color television. 

Industrial Technology 

*IT 120 — Manufacturing Processes (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 101, or GT 114, Physics 204. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
tools and basic manufacturing operations. 

*1T 121 — Production Organization (3-0-3). Prerequisites: Eco- 
nomics 101, 102. and IT 120 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in planning for production budgeting, plant location, 
machinery and equipment selection, building and service selection, 
maintenance planning, plant layout, materials handling, storekeeping 
planning, personnel organization, employee selection and training. 

*1T 122 — Economic Analysis 3-0-3 . Prerequisites: Business Ad- 
ministration 101 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in economic, financial and intangible analysis. A study 
is made of the technique of making a decision among alternatives on 
the basis of comparative cost and suitability. A study of quality control 
methods is included. 

*IT 123 Production and Cost Control 3-0-3 Prerequisites: 
Business Administration 101 and IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

Problems in factory operation, including scheduling, planning and 
detailed control of production, as well as the analysis and control of 
costs of manufacturing. 



( ( >i RSE DESCRIPTIONS 

// 121 Time and Motion Stud) UO-3 .Prerequisites: [T 121 
oi appro\ al of tin* insti uctoi . 

The stud) oi working procedures to determine the besl method, 
the best human motions and the time standard or measure of human 
efficiency, 

// 125 Mechanical Methods 0-4-2). Prerequisites: Engineer- 
ing 103, Mathematics 102 or GT 113. IT 12 1 and Physics 204. 

The course is designed to familiarize the student with machine 
mechanisms and jig and fixture design, including actual designing oi 

simple machines, jigs and fixtures. 

*IT 126— Advanced Time and Motion Study (3-0-3). Prerequi- 
site: IT 121 or approval of the instructor. 

A continuation of IT 124 designed for students specializing in this 
field. 

*IT 127— Data Presentation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: IT 124 or 
approval of the instructor. (CT 120 may be substituted with consent 
of instructor. 

Problems in graphical and numerical analysis of data. Problems in 
presenting data in the most efficient and least costly form in terms of 
time required for use. Simple graphs and charts, alignment charts, fam- 
ilies of curves and multi-variable charts. 

*IT 128 — Personnel Motivation (3-0-3). Prerequisite: Psychology 
204T. 

The course gives primary consideration to human factors in the 
design, approval and installation of personnel practices, procedures 
and systems. The case study method is used. 

Mechanical Technology 

*MT 120— Tools and Methods (5-0-5). Prerequisite: Physics 204. 

An introduction to the field of metal work and industrial manu- 
facturing. Possibilities and limitations of various machine tools are de- 
veloped. The characteristics of different materials are covered as well 
as their adaptability to the various processes. Each process is covered 
from a technical viewpoint. Correct terms are introduced so that the 
student will be able to use the language of the engineer or technician. 

*A/I 122 — Machine Shop 3-4-5). Prerequisites: Mathematics 
102 or GT 115. 

Fundamental machine operations of drilling, reaming, turning be- 
tween centers, chuck work, thread cutting, shaper work, layout and 



*Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Clamp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 



"1 ARMSTRONG ( OLLKCiK OF SAVANNAH 



finishing, special attention will he given to cutting speeds, tool and 
drill grinding and machine upkeep. 

*MT 123 Welding, Metallurgy and Heat Treating 4-4-6 . Pre- 
requisites: Physics 204. Chemistry 102 and Civ. T. 143. 

Fundamentals of metallurgy and heat treating, including a survey 

of arc and acetylene welding. Emphasis is placed on material proper- 
ties and the effect which alloying elements and/or heat treatment has 
on them. 

**MT 126— General Sheet Metal (1-2-3). Prerequisite: MT 122. 
Shop problems, including layouts and methods of fabrication of 
sheet metal. 

*MT 127 — Industrial Electricity (3-2-4). Prerequisite: Physics 
205. 

Basic elements of electrical circuits and machines. This will include 
series and parallel circuits, magnetism. D. G. motors and generators. 
A. G. motors, manual and magnetic controllers. 

*MT 128— Fluid Mechanics (5-0-5). Prerequisites: Civ. T 143. 
Chemistry 102 and Physics 204. 

Basic principles of fluid mechanics and application to lluid flow 
and instrumentation. 



* Classes to be conducted at the plant of the Union Bag-Gamp Paper Corpora- 
tion. 
**This course will be conducted at the Great Dane Trailer plant, through the 
cooperation of Great Dane Trailers. Inc. 



INDEX 

Absences 35 
Admission to ( Ilass 

Admission to College 17-20 

Admission of Veterans 22 

Administration 6 

Admission by Transfer Advanced Standing) 20 

Advisement and Placement Tests '52 

Advisei 37 

Aims 16-17 

Art. Course Descriptions 59 

Associate 1 V^nr 22 

Athletics 28-29 

Attendance Regulations 35 

Audio- Visual Instruction 27 

Biology. Course Descriptions 59-61 

Board of Regents 5 

Botany 59-60 

Building Construction Technology, Course Descriptions 85 

Building Construction Technology Program 54 

Business Administration, Course Descriptions 61-64 

Business Administration, Senior College Preparatory 39 

Business Administration, Terminal 47-50 

Business Administration, 1-Year Program 49 
Business Administration, 3-Year Programs: 

Accounting 47 

General 47 

Transportation 48 

Calendar— 1960-1961 3-4 

Chemical Technology, Course Descriptions 86-88 

Chemical Technology Programs ... 55 

Chemistry, Course Descriptions 64 

Civil Technology, Course Descriptions 88-89 

Civil Technology Programs 56 

College Commission 6 

College Entrance Examination Board's Scholastic Aptitude Test 17-18 

Commencement Exercises . 23 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 65-66 

Commerce, Secretarial, Terminal 49 

Commerce. Stenographic 50 

Conduct _ _ 33 

Constitutions: Examinations 37 

Core Curriculum 38 

Counseling 22 

Course Load ■__ 33 

Course Descriptions 59-94 

95 



INDEX (Continued) 

( !ui t iculums: 

Senioi College Preparatory Programs 39-46 

Technical Institute Programs 54-58 

Terminal Programs 47-53 

Dean's List ( See Honors) 34 

1 )egrees 35 

Dismissal from College 36 

Dramatics (Masquers) .... 29 

Economics, Course Descriptions 66-68 

Education, Course Descriptions 68 

Electrical Technology, Course Descriptions 89-92 

Electronics and Communications Technology 56 

Engineering, Senior College Preparatory 39 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 68 

English, Course Descriptions 69-70 

Entrance Requirements 16-21 

Evening Program 29-30 

Expenses 23-25 

Faculty 7-10 

Fees 25 

Forestry, Senior College Preparatory 40 

French, Course Descriptions 70-71 

General Educational Development Tests 18-22 

General Information 16-31 

General Regulations . 32-37 

Geography, Course Descriptions 71 

German, Course Descriptions 71 

Glee Club 29 

Grades 33-34 

Graduation, Requirements for 36-37 

Health, Course Descriptions 71-72 

History of the College 15 

History, Course Descriptions 72 

Hodgson Hall 25-26 

Holidays 3-4 

Home Economics, Course Descriptions 72-73 

Home Economics, Senior College Preparatory 40 

Home Economics. Terminal 50 

Honor Points 34 

Honors 34 

Human Biology 60 

Human Relations, Terminal 51 

Incomplete Grades. Makeup of 34 

Industrial Management 40 

Industrial Technology, Course Descriptions 92-93 

96 



INDEX (Continued) 

Industrial Technology Program >7 

Lat«- Registration Fee 24 

Liberal Arts. Senior College Preparatory 11 

Liberal Arts. Terminal 52 

Libera] Arts, 3-Year Program 52 

Libra. x 26-27 

Load of Work 33 

Masquers 29 

Mathematics. Course Descriptions .. 73-75 

Mathematics, Senior College Preparatory 41 

Medical Technologists. Savannah School of 52 

Medical Technology, Senior College Preparatory 41-42 

Medical Technology, Terminal 53 

Music (See Glee Club) 29 

Music, Course Descriptions 75-76 

Night School (See Evening Program) 29-30 

Non-Resident Fee 23 

Nursing 44 

Organization of the College 16 

Orientation and Advisement 22-23 

Pharmacy 45 

Philosophy, Course Descriptions 76-77 

Physical Education Program 28-29 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 77 

Physical Education, Senior College Preparatory 42 

Physical Examinations 32 

Physical Science, Course Descriptions 78 

Physics, Course Descriptions 78-79 

Physics, Senior College Preparatory 43 

Placement Service 28 

Placement Tests 32 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 80 

Pre-Dental, Senior College Preparatory 43 

Pre-Medical, Senior College Preparatory 43-44 

Pre-Nursing, Senior College Preparatory 44 

Pre-Optometry, Senior College Preparatory 44-45 

Pre-Pharmacy, Senior College Preparatory 45 

Pre- Veterinary, Senior College Preparatory 45-46 

Probation Regulation 36 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 80-82 

Publications 29 

Radio Work Shop (See Masquers) 29 

Recommendations 37 

Refunds 25-26 

Regents, Board of 5 

97 



INDEX (Continued) 



Regulations— General 


32-37 


Reports and Grades 


33-34 


Requirements for Admission 


16-22 


Requirements for Graduation 


36-37 


Residence Regulations 


14 


Scholarships 


27-28 


Secretarial. 2- Year Program 


49-50 


Senioi ( Ipllege Courses 


31 


Shorthand and Typing 


49-50 


Social Science, Contemporary Georgia 


82 


Sociology, Course Descriptions 


82-83 


Spanish. Course Descriptions 


83 


Speech 


69-70 


Stenographic, 1-Year Program 


50 


Student Activities 


28 


Student Assistants 


27 


Student Center 


28 


Student Personnel Services 


23 


Student Publications 


29 


Summer School Calendar 


3-4 


Teaching, Senior College Preparatory 


46 


Technical Institute, Course Descriptions: 




Building Construction 


85-86 


Chemical 


86-87 


Civil 


88-89 


Electrical 


89-91 


General 


84 


Industrial 


. 92-93 


Technical Institute Programs . 


30. 54-58 


Television Workshop See Masquers) 


29 


Transfer, Admission by 


20-22 


Transfer to Other Institutions 


37 


Transfer Students 


20-22 


Transportation, Terminal Programs 


49 


Warren A. Candler School of Nursing 


44 


Withdrawal from College 


35-36 


Withdrawal Schedule 


35 


Work. Normal Load of 


33 


Zoology, Courses in 


60 



98 




LETIN ARMSTRONG 
COLLEGE 



SAVANNAH 




. GEORGIA 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1961-1962 



SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING 

BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 
Savannah, Georgia 

A Unit of the University System 
of Georgia 




18551 

Membership in 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 

VOLUME XXVI NUMBER T 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



1961 






CALENDAR 




1961 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T 

2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 
16 17 18 19 20 
23 24 25 26 27 

30 


I 

7 
1 1 
21 
J 8 


S 
1 
8 

15 

22 
29 


S M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


S 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 

JUNE 


1 

5 
12 
L9 

26 


S 
6 

13 
20 

27 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


S 

5 

12 
19 
26 


M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T 

1 

4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 14 15 

18 19 20 21 22 

25 26 27 28 29 


V 
2 
9 

16 

23 
30 


S 

3 

10 

1 7 
24 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


M T W T F S 

1 2 

4 5 6 7 8 9 

11 12 13 14 15 16 

18 19 20 21 22 23 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1962 






CALENDAR 




1962 


JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


S M T W T 

12 3 4 

7 8 9 10 11 

14 15 16 17 18 

21 22 23 24 25 

28 29 30 31 


F 
5 

12 
19 

26 


S 

6 

13 

20 

27 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


S 
1 
8 

15 
22 
29 


M T W T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 7 

9 10 11 12 13 14 

16 17 18 19 20 21 

23 24 25 26 27 28 

30 31 

AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


S M T W T 

1 

4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 14 15 

18 19 20 21 22 

25 26 27 28 

MARCH 


F 

2 

9 

16 

23 


S 

lb 

17 
24 


S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


S 

5 

12 
19 
26 


M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

6 7 8 9 10 11 

13 14 15 16 17 18 

20 21 22 23 24 25 

27 28 29 30 31 

SEPTEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T 

1 

4 5 6 7 8 

11 12 13 14 15 

18 19 20 21 22 
25 26 27 28 29 


r 

> 

9 
16 
23 

30 


S 

3 

10 

17 
24 
31 


S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
J 1 25 26 27 28 29 30 


S 

2 

9 

16 

23 

30 


M T W T F S 

1 

3 4 5 6 7 8 

10 11 12 13 14 15 

17 18 19 20 21 22 

24 25 26 27 28 29 



CALENDAR FOR 19H1-19H2 



SUMMER SESSION, 1961 



M.i\ 24: Last da) to file .ill papers of Application f<>i Admission 

June 15: Registration 
June 1 6 : wes begin 

June 19: Last day to register for credit 

June _ Last day to change (lasses 

July 14: Mid-term reports due 

August 1 1-15: Examinations 



FALL QUARTER, 1961 



August 21 : 
September 13 



September 14-15 
September 18: 
September 20: 



September 22: 
October 27: 
November 8 : 

November 23-26: 
December 1 : 
December 6-8 : 
December 26: 



Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

Freshman orientation — 9:00 a.m.. Jenkins Hall Audito- 
rium 

Freshman advisement — 3:00 p.m. 

Sophomore advisement — 9:00 a.m. - 1 : 00 p.m. 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Convocation Assembly — 11:30 a.m.. Jenkins Hall Audi- 
torium 

Last day to register for credit 

Last day to change classes 

Mid-term reports due 

Installation of student officers — 11:30 a.m.. Jenkins Hall 
Auditorium 

Thanksgiving holidays 

Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

Examinations 

Homecoming Dance 



WINTER QUARTER. 1962 



December 11. 1961 : Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

January 2: Registration 

January 3 : Classes begin 

January 5: Last day to register for credit 

January 9: Last day to change classes 

February 9: Mid-term reports due 

March 9: Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

March 14-16: Examinations 



SPRING QUARTER. 1962 



March 1 : 

M.im h _'-' : 

M.ik h 23: 
March 27: 
March 29: 
April 20: 
May 1: 
May 11: 
May 

June 1-h: 
June 1 1 : 



Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

R.i istration 

( lasses begin 

Last day to registei foi * redit 

I. .ist clay to change classes 

Holiday 

Mid-term reports due 

Ga. and U.S. history and government test 

Honors Day Assembly 

Examinations 

Graduation 



SUMMER SESSION. 1962 



May 24: Last day to file all papers of Application for Admission 

June 14: Registration 

June 15: Classes begin 

June 18: Last day to register for credit 

June 19: Last day to change classes 

July 6: Mid-term reports due 

August 14-15: Examinations 



Regents, University System of Georgia 

244 Washington Street, S.W. Fourth Flooi 

\ I LAN 1 A 

District Rt gcni Ad I 

State at Large James A. Dunlap Gainesville 

February 1 ( ». I960 January 1. 1967 
Siatt- at Large Allen Woodall, President, Radio Station WDAK Columbus 

February 13, 1957— Januarj 1. 1964 
State .it Large Roj V. Harris Augusta 

February 19. 1960— January 1. 1967 
State at Large James C. Owen, Jr. Griffin 

January 11. 1961— January 1. 1963 
.a Large -Carey Williams Greensboro 

January 1, 1955— January 1. 1962 
First — Everett Williams Statesboro 

January 13. 1955— Januan- 1. 1962 
Second — John I. Spooner Donalsonville 

January 1. 1961— January 1. 1968 
Third — Howard H. Callaway Pine Mountain 

January 1. 1958— January 1. 1965 
Fourth — Robert O. Arnold Covington 

January 1. 1956 — January 1. 1963 
Fifth — Jesse Draper Atlanta 

January 1. 1961 — January 1. 1968 
Sixth — Linton D. Baggs, Jr. Macon 

July 8. 1957— January 1. 1964 
Seventh — Ernest L. Wright Rome 

February 6. 1959 — January 1. 1966 
Eighth — James D. Gould Brunswick 

February 13, 1957— January 1. 1964 
Ninth — Morris M. Bryan. Jr. Jefferson 

February 3. 1959— January 1. 1966 
Tenth — W. Roscoe Coleman Augusta 

January 1. 1958— January 1. 1965 



Officers of the Board of Regents 



Chairman 

Vice-Chairman 

Chancellor 

Adm. Asst. to Chancellor 

Assistant to the Chancellor 

Dir., Plant & Bus. Operations J. H. Dewberry 

Executive Secretary L. R. Siebert 

Treasurer James A. Blissit 

Dir. of Testing & Guidance John R. Hills 

Associate Director Harry S. Downs 



Robert O. Arnold 

Everett Williams 

Harmon W. Caldwell 

Arthur M. Gignilliat 

John E. Sims* 



*On leave. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



THE ARMSTRONG COLLEGE COMMISSION 

The Commission controls certain endowment funds and scholar- 
ship funds which have been contributed by local citizens over a period 
of years. It serves also in an advisory capacity to the college. 

I )r. Irving Victor Chairman 

Joseph H. Harrison Via -Chairman 

Frank Barragan, Jr. Dr. H. Y. Charbonneer 

Edward J. Bartlett. Grady L. Dickey 

Ex-Officio Arthur I. Jeffords 

Malcolm Bell, Jr.. William F. Lynes, 

Ex-Ofjicio E K-Officio 

Malcolm R. Maclean. 
Ex-Officio 

D. Leon McCormac 

Ex-Officio 



office of the president 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., Mercer University; M.S.. Emory University 

President 

Marjorie A. Mosley, A. A.. Armstrong College Administratis 

Assistant and Secretary to the President 



office of the academic dean 

Joseph I. Killorin. A.B.. St. John's College: M.A.. Columbia 

University Academic Dean 

Elizabeth Howard. A. A.. Armstrong College Secretary 



Mary H. Strong, A.B.. University of West Virginia Director of the 

Evening Program 

Helen Meigiii \ Secretary 



ADMIMsl K.\ I ION 



OFFICE of tin: dean of students 

J ami s I [arr> Persse, B.F.A.j Universit) of Georgia; Mastei ol Music ; 
Florida State University Dean of Students 



OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Jack II. Padgett, A.I').. Wofford College; M.A., University of North 
Carolina />' gistrai 

Elizabeth O. Hitt Assistant to the Registrar 

Minnie McG. Campbell Veterans' Affairs Officer 

Bertis Jones Secretary to the Registrar 



Nellie Hankins Schmidt. B.A., Mary Baldwin College Admissions 

Officer and Assistant Registrar 
S \r a Floyd Tuten Assistant to the Admissions Officer 

office of the comptroller 

Jule C. Rossiter, A. A.. Armstrong College Comptroller 

Norma Jean Calloway Secretary 

Corinne H. McGee Bookkeeper 



Mary Elizabeth Pound Manager, Student Cento and Book Store 



J. Allen Seay Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Joe McNeely. Jr. Assistant 



Angela McBride P.B.X. Operator 

Sara Floyd Tuten P.B.X. Operator 



ARMSTRONG ( <)[.I.K(,K OF SAVANNAH 



THE FACULTY 

Josephine Amari, A.!'.. G.S.W.C.; M.A.. Columbia University; Di- 
ploma, Sorbonne, Paris. France 

English 

M. Lorraine Anchors, A.B., M.A., Baylor University; Graduate 
Study, Cambridge University, Columbia University 

English 

*Marian B. Anderson, A.B., Texas State College for Women; M.A.. 
Columbia University 

English 

*Wesley W. Apple. B.S., Carnegie Institute of Technology 

Mathematics 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia; Graduate Study, Emory University 

Chairman, History and Political Science Department 
History 

*J. Fred Beverly. A.B., M.A.. Mercer University 

English 

*Duncan C. Blake, B.S., M.A., Louisiana State University 
Engineering Drawing 

^Stephen P. Bond, B.S. in Architecture. Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Engineering Drawing 

*S. Lee Brew in. B.B.A., University of Georgia 

Accounting 

'•Samuel A. Cann, A.B., University of Georgia: LL.B., University of 
Georgia Law School 

Business Administration 

*Glenn T. Carthron, Jr., B.B.A.. Emory University 

Business Administration 

William E. Coyi k. A.B.. Emory University; M.A.. Georgetown Uni- 
versity 

History and Political Science 



•Part time instructor. 



ADMINISTRA I [ON 



Leslu B. Davenport, B.S., College oi Charleston; M.S., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D., the University oi Georgia 
Chairman, Biology Department 
Biology 

Lamar \\ . Davis, B.S., M.S., University of South Carolina; Certified 

Public Accountant 

Chairman, Business Administration and Commerce Department 
Business Administration 

W. Katherine Di \\. B.S., University of Tennessee 

Phydcal Education 

*Charles B. M. di sIsli is. B.S.E.E., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Mathematics 

John L. M. desIslets, Col. Ret.). B.S.. United States Military 

Academy 

Chairman, Physics Depaitnu nt 
Physics 

*Orlando A. Diaz, B.S., M.A., Phillips University 

Spanish 

•'Hartley Barrett Eckersox. B.S.. M.S.. University of Tennessee 

Mathematics 
-William L. Finch. Sr., B.B.A.. M.B.A., B.Ed., M.A.. Jackson College 

Business Administration 
*Philip T. Foltz. B.S.. Michigan College of Mining and Technology 

Mathematics 

Jack B. Fowler. A.B.. University of Georgia: M.A.. George Peabody 
College for Teachers 

English 

'•Michael J. Gaxxam. B.A.. University of Georgia: M.A., University 
of North Carolina: LL.B., University of Georgia 

Political Science 
Albert Gordon. A.B.. M.A.. University of North Carolina 

English; Director of the Masquers 
*George B. Haltiwaxger, B.S., University of South Carolina 

Civil Technology 
"Lawrence W. Hill. B.S.. Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
Business A dm in i H ratio n 



*Part time instruc 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

*Philip Hoffman, B.B.A., MI). A.. University of Georgia 

Business Administration 

s. Hannah Holleman, I>.s.. M.S.. Glemson College 

Botany and Biology 

Daniel J. Hook, A.B., Newberry College; M.A.. Columbia University; 

Graduate Study. University of South Carolina and the University 
of Kansas 

Mathematics 

^Virginia L. Hudson, B.S., Georgia State College for Women: MA. 
Duke University: Graduate Work, Mercer University 

History 

*Carlos Lamas v Blanch. B.S.. Institute de la Vibora. Havana, Cuba: 
LL.B., Havana University Law School: English Diploma, Ameri- 
can International College: Graduate Work, Boston Law School 
and School of Social Sciences, University of Havana 

History 

*Joseph B. Kreinen, B.S., University of Pittsburgh: M.A.. Duquesne 
University; Special Studies. University of Odessa. Russia 

German and Russian 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B.Mus., Converse College: B.A.. Univer- 
sity of Georgia: M.A., Columbia University 

Chairman. Humanities Department 
English and French 

Muriel Bovles McCall, A.B.. Florida State College for Women: 
M.A.. University of Georgia 

*John C. McCarthy, Jr.. B.B.A.. University of Miami: M.B.A.. L'ni- 
versity of Georgia 

Business Administration 

*Elmo M. McCray, Jr.. B.S.. M.A.. University of Alabama 

Biology 

*James C. McKeEj B.A.j Master of Forestry, Duke University 

Botany 

*Francis L. Mann ion, Jr.. B.I.E.. University of Florida 

Mathematics 



Part time instructor. 



ADMIMs fRATION II 



Roberi G. Marbi i . B.S., Georgia Institute oi rechnology; Graduate 
Work, School oi Business Administration, Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 

Bu rim m Administration 

rHOMAS I )i 1 wm Maurice, A.B., LL.B., Mercei University 

Busim ts Lau 

*Eugi m Maxwei i . A.B., In lane University 

Building Construction Technology 

•J. Flei rwooD Moor] . Savannah Traffic Bureau 
Traffic and Transportation 

* Joseph C. Muller, B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Business Administration 

•Hinckley A. Murphy, A.Ik. Vanderbilt University; M.A.. Columbia 
University; Graduate Work, Florida State University 
Psychology and Sociology 

*Edward E. Murray. Jr.. A.B.. Maryland University 

History 

•Arthur P. Xarixs. B.S.. Brooklyn Polytech : M.S.. Notre Dame Uni- 
versity 

Chemistry 

Homer K. Nicholson. Jr.. B.A.. University of Georgia: M.A.. Van- 
derbilt University: Ph.D.. Vanderbilt University 

English 

•Pennington M. Nixon. II. B.A.. Duke University 
Traffic and Transportation 

James Harry Persse, B.F.A.. University of Georgia; Master of Music. 
Florida State University 

Dean of Students: Music 

Norman Ray Remley. B.S.. University of Georgia: Graduate Study. 
University of Georgia 

Psychology 

•Frank M. Rich. Jr.. A.B.. LL.B.. University of Georgia 

Political Science 

-William W. Roberts. B.S.. Georgia Institute of Technology 

Mathematics 



*Part time instructor. 



12 ARMSTRONG ( OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Roberi B. H. Rockwell, Col. Ret. . B.S., Georgia Institute of 
1 1 -i hnolog} 

Physics 

( ii \ki I s s . Sanford, Jr.. B.A.. University of Georgia; M.A.. Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania 

Bin i tit s \ A d m i n ist rat io n 

*Lee B. Sayre, A.B.j University of the South: M.A.. Duke University 

English 

*Louis W . SchmidTj B.S., University of Virginia: Graduate Work, 
University of Virginia 

English for International Students 

*Norman L. Shlager. B.S., Boston University: Graduate Work. Bos- 
ton University, Franklin and Marshall College 

Business Administration 

Warren Shuck. A.B., University of Buffalo: Graduate Work. Kent 
State University, Florida State University 

Roy Jesse Sims. B.S.. David Lipscomb College; M.S.. University of 

Tennessee 

Chairman, Physical Education Department 
Physical Education: Basketball Coach 

■■William Leon Smith. B.I.E.. University of Florida 

Mathematics 

*Paul G. Stoxe. A.B., Harvard University 

Art 

Robert T. Stubbs, B.S., M.S.. Georgia Institute of Technol< 
Chairman. Mathematics Department 
Mathematics 

"Mary E. Sutton, B.A., University of Georgia 

Business Administration 

Lawrence M. Tapp, B.S., M.S.. University of Tennessee 

Physical Education 



*Part time instructor. 



ADMINIS I R A I K >.\ l I 



I )« » k i > t n\ M. Thompson, AT... Monmouth College; \1 A . Northwest- 
ern University; Certificate in Psychiatric Social Work, Western 
Resen e I fniversity 

Chairman, Psychology and Sociology Department 
Psychology and Sociology 

William Livingston Travis, Col. Ret. . B.S., United States Mili- 
tary Academy; LL.B., George Washington University School oi 
Law 

Chairman. Technical InstituU 

•Richard M. Wall. B.S., Texas A. & M. College; M.B.A., Harvard 
College 

Business Administration 

•Calvin A Walters, Jr., A.B., Emory University 

Mathematics 

James F. Whitnel, A.B., Vanderbilt University: M.A.. University of 
North Carolina 

English 

Mildred Aleen Williams. B.S.. Western Carolina College; Graduate 
Study. Clemson College 

Chemistry 

Jean Wingate, B.S., University of Georgia 

Shorthand, Comptometer, and Typing 

William Swoll Winn, B.D., A.B.. Emory University: M.A.. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 

Mathematics 

•Arthur L. Zimmet, B.S., M.E.. Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 

Mathematics 

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAM INSTRUCTORS FOR 

COURSES OFFERED AT UNION BAG-CAMP 

PAPER CORPORATION 

Harold J. Atkinson, Machinist. Mill Machine Shop 
C. Duncan Blake, B.S., Master of Forestry. Louisiana State Univer- 
sity 

Julian W. Daniel, B. of Ch. E., Georgia Institute of Technology: 
M.S., the Institute of Paper Chemistry: Ph. D. the Institute of 
Paper Chemistry 



*Part time instructor. 



II ARMSTRONG COLLIDE OF S.-W'ANNAII 



J. Eari Gilbri mil B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Georgia Institute 
oi Technology 

Roberi W. Gray, B.A., Kings College 

Allick W. IngliSj B.S. in Industrial Engineering, University of 

Florida 

David W. 1\i.ii>. B.S. in Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State 
( Sollege 

WalLace J. Richards, B.S. in Industrial Engineering, Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology 

John M. YanceYj M.A. in Psychology and Personnel Management, 
University of Florida 










ML,>i 










E<"M 













GENERAL INFORMATION 

History of Armstrong College of Savannah 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on May 27. 1935, 
by the Mayoi and Aldermen of the City of Savannah to meet a long- 
felt need for a junior college. The first college building was the home 
of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city from his widow 
and daughter. The Armstrong Building is an imposing structure of 
Italian Renaissance design, with a great marble hall and spacious 
rooms. 

Over the years the campus has been enlarged through private 
donation and public appropriation until now it includes four addi- 
tional buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane: 
the John \V. Hunt Memorial Building. Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, and 
Thomas Gamble Hall. Three of the buildings on Gaston Street face 
forty-acre Forsyth Park, the largest and most beautiful park in the 
city; the other two face Monterey Square, one of the planned squares 
for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, facing Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, houses 
the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college was under the administrative control of the Ann- 
strong College Commission until January 1, 1959. when the institution 
became a unit of the University System of Georgia, under the control 
of the State Board of Regents. 

The College Program 

A college is a community of teachers and students who organize 
their energies for the work of the mind. At Armstrong College, the 
sttident works under able teachers to learn skills — such as the arts of 
language and mathematics — in order to understand man and his uorld 
through the humanities, the social sciences and the natural sciences. 

The student — working in that program best suited to his voca- 
tional choice — will discover the usefulness of these skills and of these 
kinds of knowledge for living in the world. He will find that "profes- 
sional." "semi-professional," and "technical'' programs at the college 
level further aim to teach a student how to apply — reasonably and 
imaginatively — the skill of language or mathematics, the knowledge 
of the humanities, the social sciences, or the natural sciences to the 
nerds of a particular life's work. So a college student lives in a climate 
where he is induced to make connections between what he thinks 
and does and the best that has been thought and done. 

The rewards of devotion to college work are the skills and under- 
standing to channel a student's energies intelligently for the most fruit- 



I JENERAL INK >KM \ I l< >\ 17 



till life possible foi him or her, Such rewards are not foi the asking, 
but the) arc easily within human reach. 

At Armstrong College a student may choose .1 program of stud) 
leading to the Associate in Arts degree with one of these aims in mind: 

1. To complete the freshman and sophomore years of a four- 
yeai senioi college program leading to the baccalaureate de- 
gree, with a majoi in liberal aits which includes many pre- 
professionaJ programs, &.g., law, ministry, social work, teach- 
ing . oi anothei pre-professional program, e.g., engineering, 
medicine, dentistry, or business administration. Main of the 
possible preparatory programs are listed on pages 41 to 48. 

2. To graduate from a semi-professional program, e.g., in busi- 
ness administration, secretarial skills, human lelations, pre- 
pared to go into business, or industry. See the terminal pro- 
mams listed from pages 48 to 53. 

To graduate from a two-year Technical Institute program, 
prepared as a skilled technician to go into industry, 
pages 53 to 58.) 

Armstrong Evening Classes 

In addition to the full daytime schedule. Armstrong offers a 
schedule of classes in the evening, including most of the required 
courses for many programs leading towards a degree. 

Students employed during the day are advised to limit their 
enrollment to one or two courses each quarter. 

Senior College Courses 

A limited number of upper division courses are offered through 
the Extension Division of the University of Georgia. Instructors in 
these courses are approved by the heads of the departments at the 
University of Georgia. The courses carry University of Georgia 
credit and the grades are recorded in the Registrar's Office at the 
University of Georgia. 

Fees for Extension courses are $6.00 per quarter hour. A regis- 
tration fee of 81.00 is also charged. Registration for Extension courses 
is handled by representatives of the Extension Division entirely sepa- 
rately from Armstrong registration. 

Student Personnel Services 

Armstrong College offers to students special kinds of help outside 
the classroom through a program which has attracted wide interest 
from other colleges. 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



When a student becomes aware of a difficulty related to his course 
work, he is umcd to request help from his instructor. For advice con- 
cerning his choice of vocation, the planning of his college program, 
or study habits, he should see his adviser. But the Student Personnel 
Service oilers to all students currently enrolled at Armstrong College 
additional individual services in the areas of 1 ) consultation on 
senior college programs from available senior college catalogues. 2 
consultation on scholarships, financial assistance and loans available 
for further study. 3 consultation on vocational career requirements. 
4 clearing center for student part-time job requests and part-time 
job openings, 5 individual educational and vocational aptitude tests 
for guidance in decisions affecting choice of educational concentra- 
tions and vocational careers and 16) individual and short-time coun- 
seling on any problems that handicap a student's performance at 
Armstrong Colic 

Library 

The college library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson 
Hall on the corner of Whitaker and West Gaston Streets. All the 
materials are readily available to the students since all books are on 
open shelves. On the main floor is the reference room which contains 
reference books, non-fiction books, biography, and the reserve and 
circulation desk. Downstairs is another reading room, containing 
fiction, books in foreign languages, current and bound volumes of 
periodicals, and the career information. The workroom and the 
office of the Librarian are also downstairs. 

At the present time the library collection consists of 17,000 
volumes as well as a large number of pamphlets on subjects of current 
interest. More than one hundred periodicals are received, including 
four newspapers. Besides the books, magazines and pamphlets, the 
library has a collection of recordings located in the downstairs reading 
room for the use of the students, faculty and staff. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, also 
housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains an outstanding collec- 
tion of materials on Georgia and its history as well as a large collection 
of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the Historical 
Society consist of more than ten thousand books, eighty periodical 
subscriptions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of the more 
complete files of the Savannah newspapers, dating back to 1763. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In addition to the academic side <>i college life, Armstrong ( 
lege offers a complete program of extra-curricular student activities 
designed to contribute to the development of the student and assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful membei of the community. 
This program is administered by the college through the office of the 
I )ean oi Students. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT— The Student Senate is the gov- 
erning body for student activities at Armstrong College. It i^ com- 
prised of elected representatives of all campus organizations recog- 
nized by the Senate. It is the function of the Student Senate to co- 
ordinate, direct and control student activities and organizations at 
Armstrong. 

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS— College organizations in- 
clude a dramatic club, a Glee Club, a Radio Workshop, five religious 
clubs, two political organizations, a Debate Forum, and other groups 
promoting interest in certain phases of the academic program or spe- 
cific career fields. 

THE MASQUERS offer membership to all students and 
faculty members interested in any phase of the theatre: act- 
ing, designing, lighting, make-up, costuming, and other pro- 
duction skills. THE MASQUERS possess a well equipped 
theater, and are under the direction of a professional dra- 
matics director. They produce a number of plays for the 
community annually. 

An affiliate of THE MASQUERS is the Armstrong 
Radio Workshop, formed to offer interested students an 
opportunity to develop techniques of radio broadcasting. 

The Armstrong Glee Club is composed of students who 
enjoy singing and desire the satisfaction to be gained from 
group singing. Besides two yearly concerts at the college, 
the Glee Club has produced musicals with the Armstrong 
Masquers and sung for many civic groups in Savannah. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS— There are two student publica- 
tions at Armstrong College. The Inkwell, a. newspaper, and the 
'Geechce, the college annual. These afford the students an oppor- 
tunity to express themselves through creative writing, layout and art 
work, and to gain experience in these and other journalistic activities. 

ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES— Armstrong College participates in 
intercollegiate sports competition in basketball, golf and tennis. Other 
sports at the college, such as volleyball, touch football, tennis, golf, 
softball, etc., are offered on an intramural basis with competition be- 



ARMSTRONG ( OLLECE Or s.W'ANNAH 



tween volunteer intramural teams 01 between othei interested campus 
organizations. All are encouraged to take pan in this program. 

S IT'DKNT CENTER- -The college does not operate a hoarding 
department. The Student (enter in the Hunt Building is open 
throughout the day and provide light lunches at reasonable prices. 
The Center also provides recreational facilities and houses the book 
store. 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 

An applicant foi admission to Armstrong College should obtain 
from the Director of Admissions the complete set of admission forms: 

1. Information sheet. 

2. Application form. 

3. Persona] record of biographical data. 

4. College Board and Residency Questionnaire. 

5. Card of request for transcript. 

Completion of all application forms and of all requirements contained 
therein is required of each applicant before his request for admission 
tan he considered. No application forms will he considered unless 
received by the date prescribed in the calendar on page !>. which is 
in each case at least twenty (20) days prior to the first day of registra- 
tion. Armstrong College reserves the right to terminate receipt of 
application forms when enrollment limits are reached. 

The Director of Admissions will notify the applicant that he has 
been admitted if he meets the minimum requirements for admission 
listed below. 

1. The applicant must be at least sixteen years of age and of 
established moral character. Armstrong College reserves the right to 
examine and investigate the moral worth, character, and personality 
of the applicant. 

2. The College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Apti- 
tude Test is required of all applicants for admission including those 
who have had previous college work, except as noted in paragraph 1 
under Transfer Students, page 23. The results of the tests must be 
filed with the Director of Admissions before the application can be 
considered. 

The high school principal, counsellor, or the Director of Admis- 
sions of Armstrong College will supply the necessary information for 
making application to take the College Entrance Examination Board 
Scholastic Aptitude Test; or the applicant may write directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board. P.O. Box 592. Princeton. New 
Jersey. 

3. The applicant must meet at least one of the following require- 
ments: 

a. Graduation from an accredited high school. 

b. Have credit in a minimum of 16 units, as specified 
in section 4, below, from an accredited high school. 
The applicant in this category must meet further 
qualifications determined by the Admissions Commit- 
tee. 



22 ARMSTRONG ( ( )LLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



c. Acceptable scores on the Genera] Educational De- 
velopment Tests high school Level . An overall 
average of 45 01 above with no scon- less than 45 is 
required for application to Armstrong. An applicant 
twenty years of age or over, who is not a graduate 
of an accredited high school, may take the General 
Educational Development Tests (high school level). 
These tests comprise five (5), two 2 hour exami- 
nations and must be completed two weeks prior to 
registration. Additional information may be obtained 
from the office of the Director of Admissions. 

4. A minimum of 16 units from an accredited hisrh school is 
required in the fields listed below: 

English 4 

^Mathematics 2 or 3 
(One must be in Algebra) 

Social Studies 2 

Natural Sciences 2 

Other academic units 4 

Other 2 or 1 

Armstrong College reserves the right to reject the credits from 
any high school or other institution notwithstanding its accredited 
status, where the college determines either from investigation or 
otherwise, that the quality of instruction available at such high school 
or institution is for any reason deficient or unsatisfactory. 

5. Applicants who qualify under the terms of Numbers 3 and 
4 above must also have a predicted grade point average based on 
high school record. College Entrance Examination Board scores, and 
other pertinent data as determined by the Admissions Committee of 
Armstrong College) which indicates that the applicant can pursue 
effectively the educational program oi Armstrong College. 

6. If the application forms. College Entrance Examination 
Board Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, and properly transmitted 
records of the applicant are found to be complete and in prooer 
order and the grades and scores indicate that the candidate is eligible 
for consideration, the applicant will be informed that his application 
for admission has been tentatively accepted. 

He will then be directed by the Admissions Officer to appear 
at Armstrong College for personal testing and interview. Aopoint- 
ments will be made as soon as possible after his application for 



•As most senior colleges require two 2) units of Algebra and one (1) unit of 
Plane Geometry for admission to degree programs in Engineering and/or 
Science, students planning to enter these f'elds are stronglv urged to present 
these three (3) units in mathematics for admission to Armstrong College. 



ADMISSN >\ 



admission has been tentatively accepted. Testing and interview must 
be completed prioi to the first da} oi Orientation Week or prim to 
the first da) oi registration, whichevei is the earliest date Appli- 
cants are urged to take advantage of the earliest date for testing and 
interview as final acceptance cannot be given until this process is 
completed. 

At this time, ever) applicant will he evaluated in terms oi his 

lest SCOieS and grades, scholastic aptitude, social and psychological 

adjustment, and the probability of his completing the requirements 
for a college degree. 

In reviewing the application, the interviewing representative oi 
Armstrong College shall consider all examination scores, scholastic 
records, personal data, and the applicant's ability to make the social 
and psychological adjustment to the college environment. Each appli- 
cant must give evidence of sturdiness of character, promise of growth, 
seriousness of purpose, and a sense of social responsibility. Armstrong 
College reserves the right, in every case, to reject any applicant whose 
general records and attitude do not prognosticate success in Arm- 
strong College notwithstanding the completion of other requirements. 
Armstrong College reserves the right further to test any applicant 
extensively by the use of psychological, achievement, and aptitude 
tests. 

7. The Admissions Committee shall review any application di- 
rected to it by the Director of Admissions for total study and subse- 
quent recommendation to the Director of Admissions. 

8. Acceptance or rejection of each and every application will be 
determined by the Director of Admissions, subject to the right of 
appeal as provided in the Faculty Statutes of Armstrong College and 
the by-laws of the Board of Regents of the University System. 

9. APPLICATION FORM DEPOSIT: A validating deposit of 
$15.00 must accompany each complete application form before it 
can be given official consideration. This deposit does not bind Arm- 
strong College to admit the applicant nor does it indicate acceptance 
of the applicant's qualifications. If the applicant is admitted, the 
deposit will be applied towards tuition for the quarter following 
acceptance. The deposit will be refunded to the applicant if he is not 
eligible for admission. Any student who withdraws during the first 
quarter of his attendance shall have his admission deposit deducted 
before any computation is made of the refund to which he may be 
entitled. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

1. Students who desire to transfer to Armstrong College from 
another college in the University System of Georgia will not be re- 
quired to present scores of the College Entrance Examination Board 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Scholasti< Aptitude lest. Those students who transfer from colleges 
outside the University System of Georgia will be required to present 

stoics oi the College Entrance Examination Hoard Scholastic Apti- 
tude lot. In ever) othei respect, transfer students must comply 
with admission requirements of entering freshmen. 

Testing and interviews must be completed prior to the first day 
of Orientation Week or prior to the first day of registration, which- 
ever is the earlier date. Applicants are urged to take adyantage of 
the earliest date for testing and interview as final acceptance cannot 
he given until this process is completed. 

2. Transfer students should refer to the foregoing information 
relatiye to the admission procedures, requirements, and dates of filing 
the completed application with the Office of the Director of Admis- 
sions. 

3. Transfer applicants must comply with the policy of the 
Board of Regents in furnishing the certificate found in the official 
application for admission form. 

4. The applicant must request that official transcripts showing 
evidence of studies pursued at all other colleges or uniyersities be 
sent to the Director of Admissions. These transcripts must furnish a 
statement of honorable dismissal. Completion of ALL application 
forms is required of each applicant for admission by transfer from 
other institutions before his request for admission can be considered. 
It should be understood that only those applicants will be admitted 
whose past records indicate a fayorable prospect of successful study 
with the faculty and with other students in college. Every transfer 
student seeking admission will be e\aluated for aptitude, achievement, 
motivation, social and psychological adjustment, scholastic perform- 
ance and probability of completing the requirements for a degree. 

5. Armstrong College reseryes the right to deny admission to 
any student transferring to Armstrong College when, in the opinion 
of the Director of Admissions, the academic standards or the admis- 
sion procedures of the institution (s) preyiously attended are not 
equiyalent or comparable to those existing at Armstrong College. 

6. When a transfer applicant's qualifications are in question, 
the Director of Admissions, at his discretion, will refer the application 
in totality to the Admissions Commitee for its review and recom- 
mendation. However, the final determination of the applicant's eligi- 
bility lor admission to the College will be made by the Director oi 
Admissions. 

7. Acceptance or rejection of each and every application will be 
determined by the Director of Admissions, subject to the right of 
appeal as provided in the by-laws of the Board of Regents of the 
Universitv S\ stem. 



tDMISSN >\ 



APPLICATION FORM DEPOSIT: A validating deposit of 
$15.00 must accompany each completed application form before it 
can be given official consideration. This deposit does not bind Arm- 
strong College to admit the applicant noi does it indicate acceptance 
i)i the applicant's qualifications. It the applicanl is admitted, the 
deposit will be applied towards tuition I'm tin quartei following 
acceptance. The deposit will be refunded to the applicant if he is 
not eligible for admission. 

rhe amount of academic credit that Armstrong College will 
allow for work done in another institution within a given period ol 
time ma) not exceed the normal amount of credit that could have 
been earned at Armstrong College during that time. A maximum of 
sixty 60 academic quarter hours horn an accredited college may 
lie applied in the program for which the applicant desires to enroll. 

10. Courses transferred for credit from other colleges or uni- 
versities must have an over-all average of "C" grade. Under no cir- 
cumstances will credit be allowed for courses in freshman English 
unless the grades received are "C" or better. College credit will not 
be allowed for such courses as remedial English and remedial mathe- 
matics or courses basically of secondary school level. 

11. It is the policy of the Board of Regents that the total num- 
ber of hours that may be earned toward an associate degree by 
extension courses shall not exceed 22/2 quarter hours. 

Admission of Veterans 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Develop- 
ment tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do col- 
lege work. A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA Form 
VB 7-1993) is required of every veteran who attends this institution 
under Public Law 550 (Korean Bill), application for which may be 
completed at the Veterans Administration office at 300 Drayton 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, or at the State Department of Veterans 
Service. 10 East Bay Street. Savannah. Georgia. Immediately upon 
receipt of Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement from the Veterans 
Administration the student should contact the Armstrong College* 
Veterans Office regarding processing of certificate and future monthly 
reports. All veterans attending Armstrong College under Public Law 
550 should be prepared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 

Physical Examinations 

Each day student must submit a completed physical examination 
report on the forms furnished by the college before he can complete 



26 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

his registration. On the basis of the examination, the physical educa- 
tion director will adapt a program of training and recreation to indi- 
vidual requirements. This regulation is not applicable to students en- 
rolled in the Evening Program. 

The following is a resolution adopted by the Board 

of Regents at its meeting held in Atlanta, 

Georgia on March 12, 1958 

"RESOLVED, That the requirements for admission to the various 
institutions of the University System of Georgia be amended so that 
the following additional requirements must be met: 

1 . Any resident of Georgia applying for admission to an insti- 
tution of the University System of Georgia shall be required 
to submit certificates from two citizens of Georgia, alumni of 
the institution that he desires to attend, on prescribed forms, 
which shall certify that each of such alumni is personally 
acquainted with the applicant and the extent of such acquaint- 
ance, that the applicant is of good moral character, bears a 
good reputation in the community in which he resides, and. 
in the opinion of such alumnus, is a fit and suitable person 
for admission to the institution and able to pursue successfully 
the courses of study offered by the institution he desires to 
attend. 

Provided, however, that any applicant who seeks admission to 
an institution with an enrollment less than 1000 students and 
who lives in a county in which no alumnus of the institution 
he wishes to attend resides, may furnish a certificate from the 
Judge of the Superior Court of his circuit in lieu of the 
certificate from alumni. In such a case the certificate of the 
Judge of the Superior Court shall set forth the same facts 
that the alumni certificate must contain in other cases. 
Each such applicant shall also submit a certificate from the 
Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court of the county in 
which the applicant resides that such applicant is a bona fide 
resident of such county, is of good moral character and bears 
a good reputation in the community in which he resides. How- 
ever, any applicant who lives in a county having a population 
of 100,000 or more, may submit in lieu of the certificate from 
the Ordinary or Clerk of the Superior Court a certificate, on 
a prescribed form, from a third alumnus of the institution 
that applicant desires to attend. This third alumnus shall be 
one of those on a list of alumni designated by the president 
of the alumni association of the institution to assist the insti- 
tution in its efforts to select students of character, aptitude. 



ADMIssK )N 27 



and ability and to obtain corroborating evidence regarding the 
place of residence oi such students. The certificate of the 
third alumnus in counties with .1 population of loo.ooo or more 
shall set forth the facts required in the certificate from the 
Ordinary oi Clerk of the Superior Court. 

2. Am non-resident of the State applying for admission to an 
institution of the University System of Georgia shall submit 
a similar certificate from two alumni of the institution that he 
desires to attend, or from two reputable citizens of the com- 
munity in which the applicant resides. Every such applicant 
shall also submit a certificate from a judge of a court of record 
of the county, parish, or other political sub-division of the 
State in which he resides that he is a bona fide resident of such 
county, parish, or other political sub-division and a person of 
good moral character and bears a good reputation in the com- 
munity in which he resides. 

3. There is reserved to every institution of the University System 
of Georgia the right to require any applicant for admission to 
take appropriate intelligence and aptitude tests in order that 
the institution may have information bearing on the appli- 
cant's ability to pursue successfully courses of study for which 
the applicant wishes to enroll and the right to reject any appli- 
cant who fails to satisfactorily meet such tests. 

4. There is reserved to every institution of the University System 
of Georgia the right to determine the sufficiency of any certifi- 
cate required by this resolution; the right to determine whether 
any applicant has met the requirements for admission as set 
forth by this resolution, or otherwise, and is a fit and suitable 
person for admission to such institution. There is also reserved 
the right to reject the application of any person who has not 
been a bona fide resident of Georgia for more than twelve 
months. 

5. If it shall appear to the president or other proper authority 
of any institution of the University System of Georgia that the 
educational needs of any applicant for admission to that insti- 
tution can best be met at some other institution of the Univer- 
sity System, he may refer the application to the Board of 
Regents for consideration, for reference or assignment to such 
other institution. 

6. This resolution shall become effective immediately and cata- 
logs of all institutions of the University System shall carry 
these requirements. Catalogs already printed shall carry inserts 
or addenda showing these requirements. The foregoing require- 
ments shall apply to all applicants who have applied for ad- 
mission to any institution of the University System of Georgia. 



28 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

but have not been actually enrolled and admitted, and to all 
applicants who hereafter make application foi admission to 

any such institution. 

7. All alumni, ordinaries and clerks of the superior courts, called 
upon or requested to execute certificates on behalf of appli- 
cants for admission to an\ institution under am paragraph 
as hereinbefore provided, shall, with respect to certifications as 
to good moral character, reputation, fitness and suitability for 
admission to the institution, and ability to pursue successfully 
the courses of study therein, be guided and controlled by the 
lollowing standards: 

(a) Age of applicant. 

In Past educational record, academic achievements, and 
overall scholastic ability of the applicant. 

(c) Temperament, demeanor and attitude of the applicant. 

(d) Any past criminal record of the applicant or other dis- 
ciplinary problems. 

(e) Sobriety. 

(f ) Martial status, and all other similar obligations. 

(g) Financial ability of the applicant to successfully defray 
all school and living expenses. 

(h) Physical and mental fitness — any nervous or other phy- 
sical defects or disorders. 

( i ) Any military service record of the applicant. 

(j ) The general reputation of the applicant in the community 
in which he or she resides, as the same may be known 
to such alumnus, ordinary, or clerk, or as may be made 
known by recommendations or testimonials from persons 
known to such alumnus, ordinary or clerk to be reliable." 

This 28th day of October, 1958. 

s/s L. R. Siebert, Executive Secretary 
Regents of the University System 
of Georgia. 



The Board of Regent at its meeting on April 22, 1959, approved 
the following regulations regarding classification of students as resi- 
dents and non-residents of the State foi fee purposes: 

"RESOLVED. That the Board of Regents of the Universit) 
System of Georgia shall and it does hereby declare that in order to 
registei .is a legal resident of Georgia at an institution of the Uni- 



ADMISSION 






versit) System, a student must establish 
satisfaction oi the registering officer: 



the following facts t<> the 



2 1 years oi age at tin- time he seeks 
at the beginning of any quartei will 



1 . A student w ho is under 
to register or re-registei 
be accepted as a resident student only upon a showing 1>\ him 
that his supporting parent or guardian lias been .1 bona fidi 
resident of Georgia foi a period of .it least twelve months im- 
mediatel) preceding the date of registration or re-registration. 

2. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed as 

the guardian of a non-resident minor, such minor will not he 
permitted to register as a resident student until the expiration 
of one year from the date of the appointment, and then only 
upon propei showing that such appointment was not made to 
avoid the non-resident fee. 

j. If a student is over 21 years of age, he must show that bona 
fide residence in Georgia was established at least one year prior 
to the registration date. Any period of time during which a 
person is enrolled as a student in an educational institution 
in Georgia may not be counted as a part of the year's residence 
herein required when it appears that the student came into the 
State and remained in the State for the primary purpose of 
attending a school or college." 



FEES 



Application Deposit 

Fhe Application Deposit of $15.00 is made by all students at 
the time of initial application for admission to Armstrong College. 
This fee is applied as a credit against registration fees, if registration 
is completed the quarter following acceptance: otherwise, not refund- 
able. The acceptance of the Application Deposit does not constitute 
acceptance of student. If applicant wishes to withdraw application 
for admission, complete refund will be made provided written request 
is received twenty days prior to official registration date of the quar- 
ter following acceptance. The Application Deposit will be refunded 
to the applicant if he is not eligible for admission. Any student who 
withdraws during the first quarter of his attendance shall have his 
admission deposit deducted before any computation is made of the 
refund to which he may be entitled. 

Matriculation Fee 

The Matriculation Fee for students registering for the normal 
course load of fifteen hours is $45.00. Special students (those carrying 
less than 12 credit hours in a quarter) will pay at the rate of $3.75 per 
quarter hour in Matriculation Fee. 

Out of State Tuition 

Non-residents of Georgia must pay a fee of $60.00 per quarter 
in addition to all regular fees. Special students (those carrying less 
than 12 credit hours in a quarter) who are not legal residents of 
the State of Georgia will pay at the rate of $5.00 per quarter hour 
Out-of-State Fee in addition to all regular fees. 

Student Activity Fee 

There will be a student Activity Fee of $10.00 per quarter. 
This fee is not refundable. Sttident Activity Fee will be charged to 
any Day Student who has registered for ten or more quarter hours. 
No charge will be made to Evening Program Students. 

Late Registration Fee 

In the Summer Session a late registration fee of $4.00 will be 
charged to students registering on the first day of class and a fee of 
$5.00 will be charged for registrations completed on the last day to 
register for credit. 



FEES 




Change of Schedule Fee 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the changing of a student's schedule 
alter the registration cards have been processed. No charge is made 
if the change is initiated by the College. This fee is not refundable. 

Graduation Fee 

A Graduation Fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

Transcript Fee 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. 

Music Fees 

Students enrolled in Applied Music Courses will be required to 
pay a special fee. The fees are indicated in the description of course^ 
found under "Course Descriptions'' elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Make-up Test Fee 

For cause, a student may arrange with an instructor to make 
up an announced quiz or final examination. The arrangements to 
make up the announced test must be made within one week after the 
student returns to college. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for the making up of any announced 
quiz and a fee of $5.00 for a make-up final examination and labora- 
tory examinations, except as shown below. The total charges to any 
one student for a final make-up examination in a given subject shall 
not exceed $5.00. All fees will be paid to the Business Office. 

The conditions under which fees for make-up quizzes and final 
examinations will not be charged are as follows: The student was 
absent (1) on official college business; (2) due to illness; (3) because 
of death in the family; or (4) in observing religious holidays. 



32 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The student's reasons for claiming exemption from paying the 
fee must be presented in writing to the instructor. 

Summary of Fees 

Matriculation, per quarter $ K5.00 

Student Activity, per quarter 10.00 



TOTAL FOR GEORGIA RESIDENTS - '>5.00 

Out-of-State Tuition, per quarter 60.00 



TOTAL FOR NON-RESIDENTS SI 15.00 

Matriculation, Special Students, per quarter houi 3.75 
Non-Resident Tuition. Special Students, per quarter 

hour (in addition to Matriculation Fee) 5.00 

Application Deposit I paid only once, applied against fees 15.00 

Privilege Fees 

Late Registration — Maximum S 5.00 

Special Examinations 2.00 

Final Examinations 5.00 

Graduation 7.50 

Transcript, first one free, each additional 1.00 

Change of Schedule 2.00 



Refunds 

Refunds of fees will be made only upon written application for 
withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to students dropping 
a course. Students who formally withdraw during one week following 
the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 80 r r of 
the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally withdraw dur- 
ing the period between one and two weeks after the scheduled regis- 
tration date are entitled to a refund of 60 r r of the fees paid for that 
quarter. Students who formally withdraw between two and three 
weeks after the scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund 
of 40 r r of the fees paid for that quarter. Students who formally 
withdraw during the period between three and four weeks after the 
scheduled registration date are entitled to a refund of 20 r r of the 
fees paid for that quarter. Students who withdraw after a period of 
four weeks has elapsed from the scheduled registration date will be 
entitled to no refund of any part o\ the fees paid for that quarter. 



FEES 33 

Students who formally withdrew from the Summei Session are 
entitled to refunds as follows: 
Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd oi 

3rd day of first week 80$ refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

day of first week 60$ refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 1st, 2nd or 

3rd day of second week 40$ refund of fees paid 

Withdrawal on 4th or 5th 

da) of second week 20$ refund of fees paid 

Fees and Charges are Subject to Change 
at the End of any Quarter 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have made reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application forms may be secured in the President's office in the Arm- 
strong Building. Those who wish to apply for a scholarship for the 
school year beginning in September should file an application in the 
President's office not later than July 15. All applicants are required 
to appear before an oral interview board during the month of August. 
Each applicant is notified in writing when to appear for his interview. 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF WOMEN ACCOUNTANTS — 1 
is offered each year. Value: $100.00. (Women only are eligible.) This 
scholarship is awarded to a woman student from one of the local high 
schools who is planning to major in accounting. 

ARTHUR LUCAS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS— 6 are of- 
fered each year. Value: $100.00 each. (Both men and women are 
eligible.) 

JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE— 3 are offered each 
year. Value: $175.00 each. (Both men and women are eligible.) One 
scholarship is awarded to a sophomore and one to a freshman. 

EDWARD McGUIRE GORDON MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP— 1 is offered each year. Value: $200.00. (Men only are eligible.) 
Applicants must be residents of Chatham County. 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY— 2 are offered each year. Value: 
$129.00 each. i^Both men and women are eligible.) These scholarships 
are awarded to students in the dav school onlv. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



PANHELLENK ASSOCIATION OF SAVANNAH— 1 is of- 
fered each year to a woman student. Value: $100.00. 

HARRY (.. s rRACHAN, III MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP— 
1 is offered lor the school year 1960-61. Value: 8100.00. (Both men 
and women are eligible. ) 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is in- 
terested or to the President of the college. 









REGULATIONS 

Faculty Advisers 

The Academic Dean's Office assigns a faculty advise] foi every 
student enrolled in da\ oi evening classes. Before registering foi 
classes each quartei a student must consult his advise] and receive 
his written approval for the courses in which the student plans to 

enroll. 

Placement Tests 

To help a student select a definite objective early in his college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman 
a series of interest and achievement tests. Achievement tests in English 
and mathematics are administered prior to admission. Placement in 
English and mathematics courses is determined on the basis of the 
student's high school record and the scores on these tests. Interest 
tests are administered during Freshman Week. On the basis of these 
objective measurements, the student's previous record, and his interest, 
the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of study 
which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Placement in "English 100" 

On the basis of entrance test scores and high school record, cer- 
tain students will be required to take "English 100" in their first quar- 
ter. This course must be completed with a grade of at least "C" 
before these students may register for any other English course. "Eng- 
lish 100" may be repeated once, but only in the following quarter. 

Physical Education Program 

All day students who are carrying as many as 10 quarter hours 
and (or) are candidates for diplomas or certificates are required to 
attain credit for six physical education courses, one each quarter. A 
student graduating in less than six quarters may reduce the physical 
education requirements accordingly. Regular courses should be taken 
in proper sequence and two required courses should not be scheduled 
in any one quarter. 

Students planning a one-year program may choose any three 
of the required physical education courses. 

A student who has served a minimum of three months in the mili- 
tary services shall be exempt from Physical Education 11. A student 
who has served a minimum of six months in the military services shall 
be exempt from Physical Education 11 and 12. Proof of service time 
shall be presented. 

In order for a day student to be excused from any one physical 
education course, he must have his or her doctor sign a special form. 
A student who does not plan to graduate from Armstrong College will 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

be allowed to registei for any one quartei without physical education 
providing he or she signs the proper form. No student ma\ registei 
without a required physical education course except with written per- 
mission from the Physical Education Department. 

The physical education department requires all students to make 
up all excused absences. Any unexcused absence from class will result 
in a lower final grade. 

Physical education is not required of students in the evening 
program. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that the aver- 
age student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per week to his 
college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a Ci B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to Graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

No student will be allowed to take more than 1 1 quarter hours of 
work in the Evening Program during the fall, winter and spring quar- 
ters unless he has better than a "B" average in the last quarter for 
which grades are available. A student will be limited to 6 quarter hours 
during any one term of the summer unless he has better than a "B" 
average in the last quarter of work for which grades are available. The 
limitations in the two preceding sentences apply only to students who 
are full-time employed. All entering students and students with full- 
time employment are limited to 1 1 quarter hours of work in the fall, 
winter and spring quarters; and to 6 quarter hours of work during any 
one term of the summer session. This regulation does not apply to 
transient students who are regularly enrolled in another institution. 

Auditing 

A student wishing to "'audit" a course without receiving credit 
must obtain the written permission of the instructor before he registers 
for the course. (Policy for some courses forbids "auditing" An 
"auditor" cannot change to regular credit status after the first week 
of class. A student who registers for a course as an "auditor" receives 
no credit, "N. C", on his transcript. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 



REG1 I. A I ions 37 



Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations oi the faculty and the Regents <>l 
University System of Georgia is assumed. Gambling, hazing, and the 
use on the campus of intoxicating beverages are prohibited. 

Attendance 

At Armstrong a student's responsibility towards a course includes 
all that transpires in class sessions as well as the subject matter of the 

course. Any absence whatsoever from class work entails a loss to the 
student. 

An absence may be excused by the instructor if the student is 
absent 

( 1 ) on official college business, 

(2) due to illness (with a doctor's certification), 

(3) because of death in the immediate family, 

(4) in observing religious holidays. 

In unusual instances an instructor may excuse an absence for other 
serious reasons. 

A student who has been absent from class for such a valid reason 
should present a written statement to his instructor. If the instructor 
approves the excuse, he will initial it, and the student should file 
the form in the Registrar's or Evening Program Office. 

Excuses must be submitted w r ithin seven days from the date the 
student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not be excused. 

Any student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
times the class meets in one week, and has one additional absence, 
will be dropped from class. The instructor will notify the Registrar's 
Office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's Office- 
will notify the student. A student who is dropped within three weeks 
after the beginning of the quarter will automatically receive a grade 
of W. A student who is dropped after the third week of the quarter 
will receive either a W or a W/F depending upon his status at the 
time he withdraws or is dropped from class. 

A student will be penalized for unexcused absences from the 
first day the class meets (even though registration is not yet com- 
pleted), unless one of the four valid excuses applies. 

Any student whose absences for any cause exceed one third of the 
number of times the class meets in the quarter will be dropped from 
the class. The student will be given W or W/F depending upon his 
academic status at the time he is dropped. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

make such an intention known to the Registrai in writing. This 
notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

A student should formally withdraw from any class by securing 
the signature of the instructor and his faculty adviser. This written 
approval should be filed in the Registrar's office. A student who 
withdraws within three weeks after the beginning of the quarter will 
automatically receive a grade of W. A student who withdraws after 
the 3rd week of the quarter will receive a W or W F depending upon 
his status at the time the student withdraws or is dropped from class. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by faculty that students in college should be held 
accountable for their scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, warnings 
of deficient scholarship and all such notices are not sent to parents 
or guardians by the Registrar except on request. Instead the students 
themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact their 
advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued 
at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades are issued in the 
middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an adviser: in 
addition, the Registrar and all instructors are available to help any 
student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
Incomplete must be removed before 
mid term of the following: quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
g Course must be repeated 

A student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade) should consult 
his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of the 
course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the middle of the 
succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F".* 

Any student in the Evening Program who is unable to remove a 
grade of '*E" because of absence due to military service or conditions 
of employment, may appeal to the Academic Standing Committee for 
a waiver of this regulation. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load 'not less than fifteen hours per quarter), 
and achieving an average grade of "B" or better with no grade below 

*A grade of "E" received in the Spring Quarter must be made up by mid-term 
of the following Fall Quarter. 



A plus 


96-100 


Exceptional 


A 


90- 94 


Excellent 


B 


80- 89 


Good 


C 


70- 79 


Fair 


D 


60- 69 


Poor 


E 




Incomplete 


F 




Failure 


W 




Withdrew 


W/F 




Withdrew F 



REGULA1 K >NS 

that of "( '■" xx ill be placed on the Permanent Dean's list. This list is 
published each June in the commencement program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List .iikI who are graduating with an average of lour honor points pei 
quarter horn, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude (with 
highest distinction . The designation cum laude with distinction) will 
be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements with an aver- 
age of three honoi points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will Ik- selected by the graduating (lass from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a made of "B" or bettei 
in each course during any quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scho- 
lastic Attainment List. 

students in the Evening Program enrolled for ten or more hours, 
who earn 15 consecutive quarter hours of credit with grades ol "B" or 
better in each course will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attain- 
ment List 

Dismissal 

Any day student failing I except in cases excused before examina- 
tions on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than physi- 
cal education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. Any student who fails to make an average of at least 1 .6 honor 
points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the first three 
quarters work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. With- 
drawal is recommended to all students who have less than a "G" aver- 
age at the end of the fourth quarter. At the end of the sixth quarter's 
work a student must have an 1.8 honor point per quarter hour average 
in order to re-register. 

Any student in the evening program seeking credit who fails (ex- 
cept when excused before final examination on account of illness) to 
pass at least one course with a recorded grade of "D" or better in two 
consecutive quarters will be dropped from the rolls of the college. Any 
student in the evening program who fails to make an average of at 
least 1.6 honor points per quarter hour in the first 50 quarter hours of 
work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. Withdrawal is 
recommended to all students who have less than a "C" average at the 
end of 70 quarter hours of work. At the end of 90 quarter hours of 
work, a student must have an average of 1.8 honor points per quarter 
hour in order to re-register. 

Students who have been asked to withdraw on account of academic 
deficiency will be re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes to 
another college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If a stu- 
dent does not go to another college he may re-register at Armstrong 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

( lollege after two quarters.* He re-enters on probation for one quarter. 
during which quarter he must make a "C" average. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of study listed elsewhere 
in the catalog under "Curricula" with an average grade of 
"C". Any exceptions to a program may be referred by a stu- 
dent's adviser to the Committee on Academic Standing. 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation will be com- 
pleted at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. By state law one of the requirements for a diploma or certifi- 
cate from schools supported by the State of Georgia is a dem- 
onstration of proficiency in United States history and govern- 
ment and in Georgia history and government. 

A student at Armstrong may demonstrate such proficiency b\ 

passing 

1) History 100. 

or 2) Political Science 113 and History 226, 

or 3) A two hour examination in United States and Georgia 
history and government. 

A student should apply in writing at least one week in 
advance for permission to take this examination to the 
Chairman of the Department of History and Political 
Science. Examination dates are given in the calendar. 

4. When exceptions to prerequisites for courses are made, permis- 
sion may be granted only by the head of the department con- 
cerned. A recommendation regarding any request for exception 
to prerequisites for courses must be made to the department 
head by the course instructor. This need not be binding upon 
the department head. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Regis- 
trar's office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the grades 
the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinion^ ex- 
pressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and other 
agencies having access to confidential records. A £ood college record is 
of vital importance to a student. 
•The Summer Session counts as a quarter. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

lhc Degree ol Associate in Aits is conferred upon those students 
who successfully complete one ol the two-yeai programs in tins section. 

Before registration every student must plan a program of stud) 
with a faculty adviser appointed by the Academic Dean. Even if a 
student knows what courses ate required in his program, he musl have 
on record in the office of his adviser a copy of his program. Before a 
student ma\ change his planned program he must consult his adviser. 

// a student plans to transfer to anothei college either before or 
after graduation, he should acquire the catalog of that college in order 
to determine what courses must be completed at Armstrong to meet 

the degree requirements of the college to which he may transfer. 

The student is responsible for securing approval for his program 
from his adviser and the Registrar two quarters prior to the expected 
date of graduation. 

Courses numbered 100 to 199 are generally planned for the fresh- 
man level; courses numbered 200 to 299 are generally planned for the 
sophomore level. 

The "core curriculum'* includes certain of the courses which the 
college considers essential to all college educated men and women. 

These courses are required in all programs leading to a degree: 

English 101. 102; 201. 202 (in certain terminal programs Eng- 
lish 228 may be substituted for English 102. 201 or 202) ; 

History 114, 115; 

Natural sciences (ten quarter hours from biology, chemistry, 
physics, and physical science) ; 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113, and any three courses num- 
bered in the 200's. (For exceptions to requirements for physical 
education, see Regulations, p. 35.) 

Knowledge of United States history and government and of 
Georgia history and government must be demonstrated in order 
to receive a degree or certificate. (Consult Requirements for Grad- 
uation on page 40.) 



42 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
PROGRAMS 



Business Administration (1) 



First Year 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114. 115 10 
Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 101 5 

Mathematics 103 5 

Business Administration 115 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 



English 201. 202 10 

Physical Education 3 
Business Administration 101. 102 10 

Economics 101. 102 10 

Political Science 113 5 

Business Administration 260 5 

Elective 5 



TOTAL 



48 



Engineering (2) 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for most types of 
engineering. The courses required for the freshman year have been 
planned in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology . 



First Year 

English 101. 102 10 
Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 

Chemistry 101. 102 10 

Mathematics 101, 102.. 104 15 

Chemistry 104 5 

Engineering 101. 102 4 

Engineering 109 2 



Second Year 

English 201. 202 10 

Physical Education 3 

Mathematics 201. 202. 203 15 

Phvsics 207. 208. 209 .. 18 

•♦History 114. 115 10 

♦♦Political Science 113 5 



TOTAL 



61 



TOTAL 



49 



Forestry (3) 

A one-year program for student; 

English 101, 102 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 

Biology 121. 122 

Economics 101 

Engineering 101 

Mathematics 101. 102 

Phvsics 204 or Physical Science 101 

Political Science 1 13 

TOTAL 



Forest 



r\ 



10 

3 
L0 

5 

_• 

10 

5 
5 



50 



'3 quarters of a foreign language may be taken instead of the social sciences 



SENU >K COL] EGE PREPARA loKV IM« ><,k Wis 






Industrial Managemenl (.*>) 

This program will satisfy degree requirements foi tin- first two 
years of this field of engineering. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102 10 English 201, 202 10 

History 111 5 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113 3 History 115 5 

Chemistry 101, 102 10 Business Administration 101, 102 10 

Chemistry 104 5 Economics 101. 102 10 

Engineering 101, 102 4 Mathematics 103 5 

Engineering 109 2 Phvsics 204. 205, 206 15 
Mathematics 101. 102. 104 15 

TOTAL 58 

TOTAL 54 



Liberal Arts (6) 

This program is recommended for candidates for the A.B. degree, 
pie-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial. journalism, social work, and 
other pre-professional concentrations. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102 ..... 10 English 201. 202 10 

History 114, 115 10 Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 *Science 10 

Laboratory- Science 10 Two of the following courses — 

Mathematics 101 5 History 225 

Mathematics 102 5 Political Science 113 

•Foreign Language 10 Psychology 201 

Sociology 201 
TOTAL 53 Economics 101 

Philosophy 110 10 

Electiyes 10 

TOTAL 43 



*A student applying for admission to a senior college which does require the 
amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of his adviser, substi- 
tute other courses required by the senior institution during the first two years. 



■!1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Mathematics (7) 



A program designed for those students who wish to majoi in 
mathematics. 



First Year 




Second Year 




English 101, 102— Freshman 




English 201, 202 — Sophomore 




English 


10 


English 


10 


History 111. 115 Western 




Mathematics 201. 202. 203 


15 


Civilization 


10 


Physical Education 


3 


Physical Education 111. 112. 113 


3 


Phvsics 204. 205. 206, 207, 




Chemistry or Biology 


10 


208. 209 


10 


Mathematics 101 — College 




Electives 


10 


Algebra 


5 






Mai hematics 1 02 — Trigonometry 


5 


TOTAL 


18 


Mathematics 104 — Analytic 








Geometry and Calculus 


5 







K)I.\L 



48 



Medical Technology (8) 



This program is designed for those students who desire- a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Medical Technology. 



First Year 

English 101. 102 
Biology 124. 225, 226 
Mathematics 101. 102 
Chemistrv 101. 102. 104 
Physical Education 111. 112. 113 

TOTAL 



Second Year 



10 


English 201. 202 


10 


15 


Biologv 230 


6 


10 


History 114. 115 


10 


15 


French or German 101-102 


10 


L 3 


Elective 


5 




Physical Education 


3 


53 






TOTAL 


44 



Music (38) 



English 101. 102 
History 111. 115 
Physical Education 
Applied Music 
Music Theory 110. Ill 
Electives 



112 



TOTAL 



48 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGAMS 



r, 



Physical Education (9) 
First Year 

English 101. 102 

Historj lll.l 15 

Physical Education 111. 112, 113 

Biologj 124, 225 

1 Ionic Economics 232 Nutrition 

Mathematics 9 or L01 

•Electives 



TOTAL 



Second Year 



1(1 


English 201, 202 


10 


Physical Education 


3 


Biology 108. 109 


10 


••Physical Education 203 


5 


Physical Education 1 1 1 


5 


Psychology 201 


5 


Psychology 202 




Sociology 202 




48 


Electi\ es 



TOTAL 



48 



Physics (10) 

A program designed for those students who wish to major in 
Physics. 



First Year 



English 101, 102 
Physical Education 



111. 112, 113. 



Chemistry 101, 102, 104 15 



Mathematics 101 
Mathematics 102 



Mathematics 104 5 

Engineering 101, 102, 109 6 



TOTAL 



49 



Second Year 



English 201, 202 
Physical Education 
Mathematics 201, 202, 
Physics 207, 208, 209 
History 114, 115 
Political Science 113 

TOTAL 



203 



10 

3 
15 

18 

10 

5 



61 



Pre-professional: Dentistry (11) 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201. 202 10 

Biology 124, 225, 226 15 History 114. 115 10 

Mathematics 101, 102 10 Biology 230 6 

Chemistry 101, 102, 104 .. 15 French or German 101. 102 10 

Physical Education 111. 112, 113 . 3 Electives 10 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 48 

TOTAL 49 

*It is recommended that English 228 be taken as an elective course. 
**The student is exempt from this course if he has a Red Cross "Senior Life 
Saving Certificate." 



ARMSTRONG ( OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Pre-professional: Medicine (12) 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 

themselves for the study of medicine aftei completing three 01 more 
years of academic studies. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101, 102 10 English 201. 202 10 

Biology 124. 225. 226 15 Biology 230 6 

Chemistry 101. 102. 104 15 French or German 101. 102 10 

Mathematics 101. 102 10 History 114. 115 10 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Elective* 10 

Physical Education 3 



TOTAL 53 



TOTAL 49 



Pre-professional: Nursing (13) 

This is a one year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a school of nursing 
offering the B.S. degree. The program as outlined is intended to satisfy 
the requirements of the Medical College of Georgia School of Nursing. 
Students planning to transfer credits are urged to consult the pre-nurs- 
ing advisor in order to be sure that they are taking the proper courses. 

English 101, 102 10 

History 114. 115 10 

Bioloev 108, 109 10 

Chemistry 101 ..... 5 

Sociology 201 5 

Psychology 201 5 

Physical Education 111, 112. 113 3 



TOTAL 48 

Pre-professional: Optometry (14) 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optometry in the United States are relatively uniform but are not iden- 
tical. The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards of 
Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare a 
student for transfer to any school or college of optometry in the United 
States and Canada. 

First Year Second Year 

English 101. 102 10 English 201. 202 10 

History 114. 115 10 Biology 230 6 

Biology 124, 225. 226 15 Mathematics 102. 104 10 

Chemistry 101. 102 10 Sociology 201 5 

Mathematics 101 5 Psvchologv 201 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 Electives 10 

Phvsical Education 3 



TOTAL 53 



TOTAL 49 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGAMS 17 

Pre-prof essional : Pharmacy (15) 

This is a two-yeai concentration for those students who wish to 
obtain their Freshman requirements foi entrance to a school ( .i phar- 
macy. The regional schools ol pharmacy require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Pharmacy after completing two years ol 
academic studies. All students of Pharmacy are required to complete 
a five-year program, two of which are in Pre-Pharmacy and three in 
an accredited School of Pharmacy. 

First Year Second Year 

English 1 OK 102 10 English 201. 202 10 

History 1 1 1. 115 10 Economics 101 5 

Mathematics 101. 102 10 Political Science 113 5 

Chemistry 101, 102, 103 15 Physics 204 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. US 3 Biology 124. 225. 226 15 

Electives 10 

TOTAL 48 Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 53 



Pre-veterinary Medicine (16) 



This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 
their freshman requirements to be transferred to a senior institution. 
Some colleges and universities require a veterinary student to begin 
specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well-rounded foun- 
dation for the study of veterinary medicine, it is recommended that he 
pursue the two year pre-medical program. 

English 101. 102 10 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 3 

Biology 124. 225. 226 15 

Chemistry 101. 102 10 

Mathematics 101. 102 10 

TOTAL 48 



Teaching (17) 

The subjects required in the freshman and sophomore years by 
colleges preparing teachers are: English, history, mathematics, sciences, 
social studies and physical education. The program below enables pros- 
pective teachers to be certified by the State Department of Education 
as having completed two years of college and entitles the student to the 
Associate in Arts Degree. 



48 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



First Year 

English 101. 102 10 

History 114. 115 10 

Biological Science 10 
Physical Education 111.112.113 3 

Political Science 113 5 

Art 101 or Music 200 5 

*Elcctives 5 



Second Year 

Education 201 5 

English Jul. ^02 10 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

Physical Education 3 

Psychology 201 5 

♦Electives 20 

TOTAL 48 



TOTAL 



48 



TERMINAL PROGRAMS 



Business Administration: Accounting (18) 



First Year 



Business Administration 101, 

English 101, 102 

History 114. 115 


102 


10 
10 
10 


Natural Science 

Physical Education 111, 112, 
Elective 


113"; 


10 

3 
5 








TOTAL 


48 



Second Year 

Business Administration 201T. 

202T 
Endish 201. 202, or English 

201. 228 



in 



!n 



Economics 101, 102 10 

Business Administration 260 5 

Business Administration 115 5 

Physical Education 3 

Electives ... 5 



TOTAL 48 

A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 
Business Administration 236T. 237T — Income Tax Accounting 

Business Administration 229T — Cost Accounting 

Business Administration 207T. 208T 

Electives chosen from Business Administration. Economics or 

Industrial Technology courses 



TOTAL 



45 



Business Administration: General (20) 



First Year 

En-lish 101. 102 

History 114. 115 

Business Administration 101. 102 

Natural Science 

Business Administration 260 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113 

TOTAL 



in 
in 
in 
in 
5 



48 



Second Year 



10 

10 
5 

20 
Physical Education 3 



Economics 101, 102 
English 201. 202 or English 

201. 228 
Business Administration 115 
Electives 



TOTAL 



48 



'Recommended electives for elementary teachers include health, geography, eco- 
nomics. Georgia problems (Social Science 104), English 228 and additional 
science courses. 



I ERMINAL PROGRAMS 



t9 



A student who desires furthei training in this field ma) enroll foi 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will !><• 

awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

Business Administration 207T, 208T 10 

Business Administration 1511 5 

Business Administration 161 1 5 

Business Administration 162T 5 

Business Administration 231T 5 

Economics 125T 5 

Economics 1 26 5 

Economics 127T 5 

Economics 128T 5 

Economics 129T 5 

Economics 1 30T 5 

Economics 133 5 

Economics 132T 5 

Students interested in the field of Industrial Management may 

substitute 15 hours in the Industrial Technology Curriculum from the 
following courses: 

IT 121 3 

IT 122 3 

IT 123 3 

IT 124 3 

IT 127 3 

IT 128 :...: 3 



Business Administration: Transportation (21) 

As a communications center, Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management. A com- 
mittee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck lines, 
in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the professional 
classes listed below. 



First Year 

English 101. 102 

History 114. 115 

Business Administration 15 IT 

Business Administration 152T 

Business Administration 153T 

Economics 101. 102 

TOTAL 



Second Year 



10 


English 201, 202 or English 228 




10 


and Business Administration 115 


10 


5 


Natural Science 


10 


5 


Business Administration 155T 


5 


5 


Business Administration 101. 102 . 


10 


10 


Any two of the followinu; courses — 
Bus. Adm. 207T 








45 


Econs. 125T 
Econs. 126 
Econs. 128T 
Econs. 129T 
Econs. 130T 
Bus. Admin. 260 


10 









TOTAL 



45 



50 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Students desiring furthei training in this general field may select 
five other subjects listed under the Business Administration: General 
20). A certificate will be awarded upon completion of 45 horns addi- 
tional work. 



Transportation (22) 

Students wishing a thorough background in transportation ma\ 
receive a certificate upon satisfactory completion of the following pro- 

gram : 

B.A. 151T 5 

B.A. 152T 5 

B.A. 153T 5 

B.A. 155T 5 

Economics 10L 102 10 

English 101, 102 or English 228 and B.A. 115 10 

Any two of the following courses: 10 

Business Administration 207T 

Economics 125T 

Economics 126 

Economics 128T 

Economics 129T 

Economics 130T 

Business Administration 260 

TOTAL 50 



Business Administration: One-Year Program (23) 

A one year program in Business Administration (with emphasis on 
business courses) for those persons who may not wish to complete the 
two-year concentration. A certificate will be awarded to those who 
successfully complete the program. 

Business Administration 101, 102 10 

Business Administration 115 5 

Business Administration 260 5 

Economics 101, 102 10 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 



Commerce: Secretarial (24) 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for secretarial positions in business. If, becatise of prior 
training, a student is permitted by the instructor to omit the beginning 



fERMINAL PROGRAMS ~>1 



First Year 






English 101. L02 




10 


History 1 11- 1 15 




10 


Physical Education 111. 112 


if i"3 


.■> 


X .i t u r.i I Science 




10 


Commerce 101, L02, 103 




6 


Commerce 111. 112. 113 




9 



theory courses in shorthand oi typing, the student must choose elective 
subjects to supplement the total college hours required. 

Second Year 

Business Administration 101 5 
English 201. 202. or English 

20 1. 228 10 

( lommen e 2 1 3 "» 

Commerce 201, 202. 203 6 
Commerce 211.212 

Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 18 Business Administration 115 5 

Electives 8 

TOTAL 48 

Commerce: Stenographic (25) 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may acquire 
some of the clerical skills which will enable her to secure employment 
as a stenographer or clerk. Whether a student will be placed in begin- 
ning theory classes of shorthand or typing will depend upon how much 
previous training she has had in those subjects; a more advanced stand- 
ing must be approved by the instructor. A certificate is awarded upon 
completion of the following program. 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 ..... 9 

Commerce 213 5 

Business Administration 101 5 

English 101. 102 10 

Physical Education 111. 112, 113 3 

Business Administration 115 5 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 

Human Relations* (27) 

The Terminal sequence in Human Relations is designed to start 
with the student's immediate interests in learning, methods of stuck 
and aptitude measurement. The next course, on principles and facts 
about the individual's growth, needs, feelings and learning about the 
world around him is followed by a practical application through ex- 
periments or projects using the objective methods of psychology. This 
leads to a study of a person's relationship to his social groups, a study 
of marriage and family adjustments, principles and facts about the way 
that our society is organized and finally to a practical study of needs 



*Students in other concentrations may elect any Psychology or Sociology course 
in this program without adhering to the above sequence. Prerequisites are 
necessary in Psychology 202, Psychology 203. and Psychology 205. 






ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



and resources for human adjustment in our community. A student who 
completes this sequence should have a basic understanding of himself 
and others that will improve his effectiveness in his family, his work 
whether in the home 01 employed elsewhere . his social relationships 
and his responsible participation in community living. 



First Year 

English 101. 102 10 

Historv 114. 115 10 

Physical Education 111. 112. 1 13 3 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

Political Science 113 5 

Psychology 100 5 

♦Psychology 201 5 

Psychology 202 5 

TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 

English 201. 202 

Biology 124. 225 or Biology 

101, 102 
Physical Education 
Sociology 202 
Psychology 203 
Sociology 201 
Sociology 203T 
Elective 



10 

10 
3 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



TOTAL 



48 



Liberal Arts (28) 

A student in the Terminal Liberal Arts program may select the 
remainder of his electives from any courses offered by the college in 
older to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 



First Year 

En-lish 101. 102 10 

History 114. 115 10 

Physical Education 111, 112, 113.. 3 

Natural Science .. 10 

Mathematics 9 or 101 5 

**Electives .. 10 



Second Year 

English 201. 202 ..... 10 

Physical Education 3 

**Electi\es 35 



TOTAL 



48 



TOTAL 



48 



A student who desires further training in this field may enroll for 
additional courses chosen from the following list. A certificate will be 
awarded upon satisfactory completion of 45 hours of work. 

History 225 5 

Philosophy 110 5 

Select 20 hours from the following 

French. German. Spanish, or Russian 

Two additional laboratory (double) or mathematics courses 
Electiyes 15 



TOTAL 



45 



•The sequence of Psychology 201. 202 represents Introductory Psychology. 
**A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following subjects: 
Foreign Language, Political Science. Economics. Fine Arts. Philosophy. Psy- 
chology. Sociology. Mathematics (other than Mathematics 103). 



I I ( HNICAL [NS1 1 I l 1 E PROGRAMS 






Medical Office Assistant (40) 

This two year curriculum leading to the degree oi Associate in 
Arts is designed to develop a graduate who can meet the ever-in< reas- 
ing demand for efficient assistants trained not only in standard office 
operations but also in professional ethics and the routine technical pro- 
cedures that are commonly carried on in the physician's office. In addi- 
tion, the student will have a good background in the area of general 
education. 

The Medical Office Assistant must he prepared to act as reception- 
ist, office nurse, secretary and laboratory assistant. She must be tactful, 
understanding and discreet, as well as meticulously accurate in labora- 
tory work and the keeping of medical and financial records. Such an 
assistant would be in demand not only in physicians' offices but in hos- 
pitals, clinics, public health agencies, and a number of other institu- 
tions in the areas of health and welfare. 



First Year 



Second Year 



Commerce 101, 102. 103 6 

Commerce 111, 112, 113 9 

English 101, 102 10 

Biology 108, 09 10 

History 114 5 

Business Administration 101 5 

Physical Education 111. 112. 113. 3 



TOTAL 



48 



Biology 210. 120T 

Chemistry 101 

English 201 
English 202 or 228 . 

History 115 

Commerce 224 

Commerce 228 

Psychology 201 
Physical Education 

TOTAL 



48 



TECHNICAL INSTITUTE PROGRAMS 

LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE 

Basic Subjects Required in all Technical Institute Programs 

Course descriptions for Technical Institute Programs are listed 
elsewhere in this Bulletin. A student may register for any of the subjects 
in the program of his choice as soon as he has met the prerequisites. 

Six programs leading to the degree of Associate in Science are 
offered by the Armstrong Evening Program. These are two year termi- 
nal programs which qualify the student as a technician in his chosen 
field. Curriculums are available in the following technologies: Building 
Construction, Civil and Electronic. In addition three other programs 
are offered in cooperation with the Union Bag-Camp Paper Corpora- 
tion in Chemical, Industrial and Mechanical technologies. In these 
three fields the basic courses are taught at Armstrong College by the 
college staff. The advanced technical courses are conducted at the plant 



:>1 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

of the Union Bag-Gamp Paper Corporation b) fully qualified company 
personnel. Excellent shop, laboratory and classroom facilities are avail- 
able. These courses are fully accredited 1>\ Armstrong College and are 
not restricted to emjployees of the company. 

Tuition for Technical Institute courses taught at Armstrong Col- 
lege is the same .1- lot othei evening program courses. Tuition for the 
courses conducted at the Union Bag-Camp Paper plant is $1.00 per 
credit hour, payable to Armstrong College. 

Classes are scheduled whenever possible with duplicate or extra 
sessions to accommodate shift workers with rotating work hours. 

**English 100 or 101 Freshman English 5 

GT 114 Technical Mathematics I (or Math 101 ) 5 

GT 115 Technical Mathematics II (or Math 102) . 5 

Physics 204 Mechanics 5 

♦Physics 205 Electricity 5 

Physics 206 Heat 5 

Engineering 101 Engineering Drawing 2 

Psychology 204T or Applied Industrial Psychology ..... 5 

IT 128T Personnel Motivation 3 

GT 113 Technical Report Writing 3 

GT 112 or Public Speaking 3 

English 228 Fundamentals of Speech 5 

Building Construction Technology (39) 

Building Construction Technology deals with the design, construc- 
tion and construction supervision of homes, industrial plants, offices, 
schools and hospitals. The student is taught to design, draw plans and 
follow through with construction details and methods. 

Graduates in this program will be qualified for many positions, 
including engineering draftsman, general contractor, junior engineer. 
architectural draftsman and estimator, building inspector, and many 
others. 

Civ. T 121 Elementary Surveying 6 

BCT 121 Graphics ' 6 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212 Concrete Construction 5 

Civ. T 212 Structural Drafting I 2 

Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 2 

BCT 222 Building Design I 6 

BCT 2i:\ Building Design II 6 

BCT 224 Building Design III 6 

BCT 1 IJ Construction Materials and Estimates 5 

BCT 243 Building Equipment 3 

BCT 231 Architectural History 3 



..1 



»« 



*Not required for Electronics and Communications Technology. 
Depending on Placement Test. 



I l.( iink \l. INSTIT1 I E PROGRAMS 



Chemical Technology C'S1) 

The curriculum for Chemical Technology has been designed to 
meet die needs of the chemical, paper and othei related heavj indus- 
tries for competent and well-trained technicians. The program gives 
the student a working knowledge of the fundamental branches oi for- 
mal chemistry and chemical engineering. 

Industries are placing greater emphasis ever 1 ) yeai on instrumental 
methods of analysis which are far more rigid and precise than formal 
chemical methods. The student completing the curriculum in Chemical 
Technolog) will acquire training in the theory and use of these elec- 

troniCj optical and thermal instruments. 

Positions open to graduates are assistant to research personnel, 
control chemist, assistant to chemical engineers, analyst and pilot plant 
>i-sistant, as well as many others. 

Chemistry 101 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 102 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 104 Qualitative Inorganic Analysis 5 

Engineering 102 Engineering Drawing 2 

Chemistry 280a Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 1 

Chemistry 280b Quantitative Inorganic Analysis 3 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety V/i 

•Civ. T. 120 Elementary Industrial Statistics 3 

*CT 121 Experimental Design 3 

Civ. T. 160 Material Balances 3 

Civ. T. 161 Energy Balances 3 

*CT 162 Elementary Chemical Processes 4 

*CT 165 Industrial Chemistry 4 



45 1 /. 



In addition, the student will select one of the two options listed 
below, either paper and pulp or chemical. 



Pulp & Paper Option 

*CT 140 — Basic Wood Technologv, Pulping. Pulp Preparation, and 

Pulp Testing. Part I ......... 4 

*CT 141— Part II 4 
*CT 142 — Paper Making. Paper Converting, and Paper Testing. Part I 4 

*CT 143— Part II 4 

*CT 164 — Wood Structure and Properties 4 



20 



*These courses will be taught in the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



56 ARMSTRONG COLLIDE OF SAVANNAH 



Chemical Option 



Engineering 103 Engineering Drawing 2 

GT 120 Technical Mathematics III or Mathematics 104 5 

Mathematics 1 14 Slide Rule 2 

*CT 150 — Organic Chemistry 5 

*CT 151 Industrial Chemical Analysis 3 



17 

Civil Technology (34) 

Civil Technology covers one of the broader fields in the Technical 
Institute Program. The civil technician is a surveyor, a construction 
man on buildings of all kinds, highways and railroads, hydroelectric 
projects, locks, dams, tunnel and similar projects. He is trained to 
handle work in any of these fields with a minimum of supervision. 

BCT 142 Construction Materials and Estimates 5 

Civ. T 121 Elementary Surveying 6 

Civ. T 122 Route Surveying ' 5 

Civ. T 131. Highway Construction 3 

Civ. T 143 Mechanics of Materials 6 

BCT 211 Wood and Steel Construction 5 

BCT 212 Concrete Construction 5 

Civ. T 212 ... Structural Drafting I 2 

Civ. T 213 Structural Drafting II 2 

Civ. T 223 Land Surveys 5 

Civ. T 224.... Topographic and Contour Surveying 4 

Civ. T 232 Heavy Construction 4 

Civ. T 241 Hydraulics 6 



58 

Electronics & Communication Technology (36) 

This course gives the student training in the fields of electrical 
and electronic circuitry, transmission lines, radiation, wave filters, in- 
strumentation and test equipment, telephony, AM and FM radio, tele- 
vision and radar. 
GT 120 Technical Mathematics III or Math 104 5 

Elec. T. Ill Measurements 4 

Elec. T. 121 Direct Current Circuits 6 

Elec. T. 122 Alternating Current Circuits I 6 

Elec. T. 131 Basic Electronics 6 

Elec. T. 223 Alternating Current Circuits II 4 

Elec. T. 232 Industrial Electronics 6 

Elec. T. 233 Advanced Electronics 4 

Elec. T. 234 Semiconductors 4 

Elec. T. 241 Communications Circuits I 6 

Elec. T. 242 Communications Circuits II 4 

Elec. T. 254 Electrical Machinery 4 

Elec. T. 261 Communications Technology I 6 

Elec. T. 262 Communications Technology II 4 

Elec. T. 263 Television Technology 4 



73 



* I hese courses will be taught at the plant of the Union Bag-Camp Paper Cor- 
poration. 



I I i HNICAL l.\s I mi E PROGRAMS 



Industrial Technology (32) 

The curriculum in Industrial Technology is designed to enable the 
graduate to compete successfully for a variety oi supervisory and man- 
agement positions in manufacturing industries. These positions are in 
such categories as personnel work, quality control, methods and cost 
control, and the equipment, planning and production functions. 'I he 
graduate will also be qualified for many staff positions with transpor- 
tation, distributing and utility Companies, and for the operation of pri- 
\ ate business. 

Economics 101 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 102 Principles and Problems of Economics 5 

Economics 128T Principles of Marketing 5 

Business Adm. 101 Principles of Accounting 5 

Engineering 102 Engineering Drawing 2 

Engineering 103 Engineering Drawing 2 

Chemistry 101 General Inorganic 5 

Chemistry 102 General Inorganic 5 

*GT 111 Industrial Safety [] 

♦IT 120 Manufacturing Processes 3 

*IT 121 Production Organization 3 

*IT 122 Economic Analysis 3 

♦IT 123 Production and Cost Control 3 

♦IT 124 Time and Motion Study 3 

♦IT 125 Mechanical Methods 2 

♦IT 126 Advanced Time and Motion Study 3 

♦IT 127 Data Presentation 3 

♦IT 128 Personnel Motivation 3 



sva 



Mechanical Technology (37) 

This field embraces the manufacture and production of mechani- 
cal products and the tools, machines and processes by which they are 
made. In a broad sense mechanical technology is the creation and utili- 
zation of mechanical power, and men with technical institute type of 
training in this field possess a knowledge that is basic to companies in 
nearly every line of business throughout the world.